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The End of the Internet is Here !

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posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:19 AM
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I found this interesting indeed. This could effect the Net economy in a big way.

"Are you ready for the big internet crunch?"

" Within 18 months it is estimated that the number of new devices able to connect to the world wide web will plummet as we run out of "IP addresses" -- the unique codes that provide access to the internet for everything from PCs to smart phones.

"The internet as we know it will no longer be able to grow," Daniel Karrenberg, chief scientist at RIPE NCC, the organization that issues IP addresses in Europe, told CNN.

"That doesn't mean it will cease to function, but entry could be limited to new devices."

Some estimate that by September 2011 the last large batches of addresses will be issued, meaning that months after that date there will be no new addresses available.

But while this sounds like a complete disaster -- another Millennium Bug -- it need not be, and there is a solution, if we all act quickly enough. "

Read the link for more details.

Source : www.cnn.com...

I am sure they can fix this before it's a real big problem, but I wonder if they knew this was coming, why didn't they allocate more IP adress ranges sooner?




posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:22 AM
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They knew about this from the start. That is why they created the IPv6.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Fatality
 


Yep, true.

Anyway, if it did become a problem, it's an easy patch to add a few more numbers onto the IP code, to increase the permutations of IP addresses available.

Also, IPv6 had the advantage of using a 128-bit Hex addressing system. That will give you mind boggling available IP addresses.


Roll-out would be a bit of a bugger though!


[edit on 27-5-2010 by nik1halo]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by Fatality
They knew about this from the start. That is why they created the IPv6.


IPv6 would fix the problem How? ( for us non geek folks) and if IPv6 is the solution and it's no big deal... Why is this new news on CNN?



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


IPv4, the current version uses a 32-bit numerical, dot-decimal system 255.255.255.0 for example. Obviously there are only a certain number of permutations that can be achieved, 2^32 possible addresses.

IPv6, uses a hexadecimal 128-bit system, giving a possible 2^128 addresses, which I'm sure you can appreciate is quite a number!!

IPv6 was created around 1999-2000 if I recall correctly, simply because it was becoming obvious that we would quickly run out of IP addresses, so this is by no means a new story. The only reason I can think of to report this now is because we are getting closer to that day and for sensationalism.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by nik1halo]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:40 AM
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I call BS on this one, though the IP range maybe short, it's the MAC addresses I would worry about.

And btw, the end of the internet is here.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


this is "news" on CNN as they like to get people panicing about anything and everything! - Sensationalisim at its finest!

its no secret that ip addressess will run out, this has been known for a long time ... and ipv6 has been known to be the cure for along time.

the difference between ipv4 (what nearly everyone currently uses) and ipv6 are very complicated to explain ... in laymans terms... it gives is more ip addressess to use. if you think about it ... ip addressess range from 0.0.0.0 - 999.999.999.999 , so it stood to reason that one day we would run out and need something else (note - not every ip address in that range can be used)



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:49 AM
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reply to post by boaby_phet
 


Actually, the realistic range for IPv4 addresses is 1.1.1.1 to 255.255.255.255, as ranges rarely, if ever have the value 0 or 255. The maximum possible range is 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255 (FF Hexadecimal).

[edit on 27-5-2010 by nik1halo]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by boaby_phet
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


if you think about it ... ip addressess range from 0.0.0.0 - 999.999.999.999 , so it stood to reason that one day we would run out and need something else (note - not every ip address in that range can be used)


Hoping this was just a typo - otherwise, please do a little research before you try to assist with any of this. Ip ranged are from 0.0.0.0 - 255.255.255.255

The only way i can describe ipv6 so anyone could understand it is to add 255 plus A through F

All of your computers, if they are able to connect to the internet are ipv6 capable. As far any any end-user is concerned its a call to your internet provider saying "my internet is broken" there should be next to no interruption.


Originally posted by nik1halo
reply to post by boaby_phet
 


Actually, the realistic range for IPv4 addresses is 1.1.1.1 to 244.244.244.244, as ranges rarely, if ever have the value 0 or 255. The maximum possible range is 255.255.255.255 (FF Hexadecimal).


^^ has a good point, but it is "possible"

[edit on 27-5-2010 by Juggernutty]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix

Originally posted by Fatality
They knew about this from the start. That is why they created the IPv6.


IPv6 would fix the problem How? ( for us non geek folks) and if IPv6 is the solution and it's no big deal... Why is this new news on CNN?


It kind of reminds me of the y2k panic, lots of hype but the world didn't come to an end then either.

However the one thing I noticed is that IPv6 capabilities are built into Windows 7 and Windows Vista by default, but I don't see that in Windows XP.

If you're using XP, you have to install IPv6 before you can use it. Here's how:

www.microsoft.com...


To install IPv6

1.Open Network Connections

2.Right-click any local area connection, and then click Properties.

3.Click Install.

4.In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and then click Add.

5.In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Microsoft TCP/IP version 6, and then click OK.

6.Click Close to save changes to your network connection.


Now you have IPv6 installed on XP. I wouldn't do it until you need it, I can't promise it won't interfere with your current settings when you do that. I'm not sure exactly when we'll need it.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:55 AM
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Originally posted by Grey Magic
I call BS on this one, though the IP range maybe short, it's the MAC addresses I would worry about.


MAC Addresses are actually 48-bit, so there are more of them available. Also, MAC addresses are only used on LANs etc, so they are reuseable on different networks, whereas IP's are generally unique.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by Grey Magic
And btw, the end of the internet is here.


That's cute.. too bad it's broken and don't show you the Beginning of the Internet.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by nik1halo

Originally posted by Grey Magic
I call BS on this one, though the IP range maybe short, it's the MAC addresses I would worry about.


MAC Addresses are actually 48-bit, so there are more of them available. Also, MAC addresses are only used on LANs etc, so they are reuseable on different networks, whereas IP's are generally unique.


Yep, the mac-addresses are reusable. If you end up with a duplicate mac, then you have a single host issue, its as simple as swapping out a NIC card. theres not a single persona t home that would ever see this issue.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by JohnPhoenix

Originally posted by Fatality
They knew about this from the start. That is why they created the IPv6.


IPv6 would fix the problem How? ( for us non geek folks) and if IPv6 is the solution and it's no big deal... Why is this new news on CNN?


It kind of reminds me of the y2k panic, lots of hype but the world didn't come to an end then either.

However the one thing I noticed is that IPv6 capabilities are built into Windows 7 and Windows Vista by default, but I don't see that in Windows XP.

If you're using XP, you have to install IPv6 before you can use it. Here's how:

www.microsoft.com...


To install IPv6

1.Open Network Connections

2.Right-click any local area connection, and then click Properties.

3.Click Install.

4.In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and then click Add.

5.In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Microsoft TCP/IP version 6, and then click OK.

6.Click Close to save changes to your network connection.


Now you have IPv6 installed on XP. I wouldn't do it until you need it, I can't promise it won't interfere with your current settings when you do that. I'm not sure exactly when we'll need it.



2 things on this
1. 99.9% of people that do this will find they already have this protocol.
2. This actually is a problem - and yes, if we just left it as is, we would have the end of the internet.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by nik1halo
 


i know .. lol, i just realised my stupidity their ... its been like 6 months scince ive been out of work in the old networking and internet world ...

juggernutty - it was a simple mistake, and quite embaressing as ive had to learn and know this stuff for previous jobs and collage experience...

proper duu moment on my behalf, no need for anyone to get all high and mighty over it though is their.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by boaby_phet]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by Juggernutty
 


I know for a fact that it's installed on my PC. It's not being used, but it's there.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by boaby_phet
 


Dude it's been about 4 years since I've had to play around with networks. I'm having to refresh myself with a lot of this stuff. i'm generally doing security protocols these days.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by Juggernutty
2 things on this
1. 99.9% of people that do this will find they already have this protocol.
2. This actually is a problem - and yes, if we just left it as is, we would have the end of the internet.


It's not a problem anymore than "running out of phone numbers" was a problem. In fact, this is such a non-issue and old news that for a moment when I opened the thread I thought I had slipped back in time 10 years...



Also, MAC addresses are only used on LANs


MAC addresses are for any physical device connected to a network. Even the WAN transmission multiplexors, core switches and routers will have a MAC address. It isn't restricted to LAN's.

[edit on 27/5/10 by stumason]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by nik1halo

Originally posted by Grey Magic
I call BS on this one, though the IP range maybe short, it's the MAC addresses I would worry about.


MAC Addresses are actually 48-bit, so there are more of them available. Also, MAC addresses are only used on LANs etc, so they are reuseable on different networks, whereas IP's are generally unique.
Are you sure about that? My cable modem has a mac address and that's how they identify me, and Time Warner has millions of customers so I hope nobody else has the same MAC number as my cable modem.

I thought they were unique:

en.wikipedia.org...


a Media Access Control address (MAC address) is a unique identifier assigned to most network adapters or network interface cards (NICs) by the manufacturer for identification, and used in the Media Access Control protocol sub-layer. If assigned by the manufacturer, a MAC address usually encodes the manufacturer's registered identification number.

Although intended to be a permanent and globally unique identification, it is possible to change the MAC address on most of today's hardware, an action often referred to as MAC spoofing.


I've done the spoofing since Time Warner was looking for a particular mac address and I changed my hardware. But if you're not spoofing, I think it's a uniquely assigned number.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 11:09 AM
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to say that running out of IP addresses could end the internet is a joke, they could ad a few digits to the end or some letters, hell they could use hieroglyphs as an IP address it makes no difference at all. thatss like saying no one can build anymore houses because we ran out of numbers.




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