It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Oil slick cleanup making people sick

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 25 2010 @ 05:36 PM
link   

Louisiana Fishermen Helping in Spill Cleanup Report Getting Sick





Some Louisiana fishermen affected by the massive oil spill in the Gulf — including some hired by BP to help in the cleanup — are reporting cases of debilitating headaches, burning eyes and nausea, and some industry and public officials are pointing the finger at chemical dispersants as the cause.

Some Louisiana fishermen affected by the massive oil spill in the Gulf — including some hired by BP to help in the cleanup — are reporting cases of debilitating headaches, burning eyes and nausea, and some industry and public officials are pointing the finger at chemical dispersants as the cause.

Gary Burris, a fisherman who works along the Gulf Coast, said he has observed planes spraying dispersants into the water, a chemical rain meant to stop oil slicks from forming and break down the crude more quickly.

Now Burris says that after breathing in the dispersants he grew ill and disoriented, confining himself to bed for days and ultimately going to a doctor for treatment and antibiotics.

"It filled my lungs with fluid," he said. "I'm hurting — I'm sore from coughing."

Original story
I know that's a FoxNews link, but they seem non biased in this report.

These people above aren't the only ones. There are a lot of people along the Gulf coast who are reporting these same symptoms. It seems the same thing happened after the Exxon Valdez spill.

I'm not one to hark on chemtrails, but here is a pic of actually that. Spraying chemicals over the gulf.





posted on May, 25 2010 @ 05:39 PM
link   
BP was initially using a lot of fishing boats to help with the initial response as well as some of the dispersant.

Proper personal protective equipment was not used because it was not provided.
Even if it was, with the more than 800,000 gallons of this dispersant it was bound to affect the people living in the area.

And BP is still refusing Government orders to change their dispersant to something less toxic.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 05:40 PM
link   
I'm trying to browse around and find out more about Benzene poisioning as it's "popping up" in conversation more and more as I try to sort through the mess to find facts.

Don't know much about it but here's a pretty good description as well as possible causes and effects:

www.eco-usa.net...

[edit on 25-5-2010 by irishchic]



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 05:51 PM
link   
reply to post by irishchic
 

Yeah. If I remember correctly benzene used to be in paint thinner. It was removed from there eventually because it was a carcinogen. It is also in cigarette smoke. If this is what part of their dispersant is then it would not be good thing at all.
We'd probably be better off with the oil slick than massive amounts of benzene.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 06:02 PM
link   
They just want to break up the oil so it looks better... more chemicals will make the water more dangerous of course, but they're just trying to avoid as many AP photos of oil-slicked beaches as they can.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 06:22 PM
link   
Corexit is the name of their dispersant. They won't reveal the ingredients because they claim it's a trade secret. It is known to have toxic effects though.
Corexit article

From the looks of it, benzene certainly could well be used in the dispersant because of it's properties.

This is from Wikipedia on benzene's health issues.


The short term breathing of high levels of benzene can result in death, while low levels can cause drowsiness, dizziness, rapid heart rate, headaches, tremors, confusion, and unconsciousness. Eating or drinking foods containing high levels of benzene can cause vomiting, irritation of the stomach, dizziness, sleepiness, convulsions, and death.

The major effects of benzene are manifested via chronic (long-term) exposure through the blood. Benzene damages the bone marrow and can cause a decrease in red blood cells, leading to anemia. It can also cause excessive bleeding and depress the immune system, increasing the chance of infection. Benzene causes leukemia and is associated with other blood cancers and pre-cancers of the blood.


Those sound exactly like what the people are claiming they feel or have after working around the spill.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 06:33 PM
link   
Just more people trying to win the BP lottery. everyone is looking for a reason to sue BP. "Give that man a dollar collar and tell him to walk with a limp"




posted on May, 25 2010 @ 06:43 PM
link   
Exposure to any kind of petroleum based products whether it is burning, in direct contact with skin or a volatile gas can cause all kinds of respiratory and neurological damage - think Gulf War Syndrome (yeah, we're talking about a legal nightmare as far as exposure illnesses go) this can result in with severe chemical sensitivities and chronic fatigue syndrome or various other immune and neurological disorders... (think huffers when you think about the potential for neurological damage)

I wonder how many people on the Gulf Coast can actually smell this every day. If they can smell it they're definitely being exposed.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 06:51 PM
link   
Just like first responders to Ground Zero have so many health problems and are dying off, I bet that will happen to these poor guys and gals who are working on the ocean. I hope some of them have oxygen on them, but I have a feeling with the BP is, they don't.

People who worked on Exxon still are feeling the effects on their health in Alaska. The webpage talks about that.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:11 PM
link   
reply to post by webpirate
 


Well


Why aren't they all using respirators out there?

Benzene, Gasoline, Diesel, acetone, propane, methane, xylene, butane and so on are all evaporating at the same time out there. You'd have to be mad to not have lung protection.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
reply to post by webpirate
 


Well


Why aren't they all using respirators out there?

Benzene, Gasoline, Diesel, acetone, propane, methane, xylene, butane and so on are all evaporating at the same time out there. You'd have to be mad to not have lung protection.


According to the original article they were given only 4 hours of training and they weren't supplied with any respirators or protective equipment.


But critics say the rudimentary safety training given to the fishermen isn't enough. While BP's "key requirements" include a four-hour training session and a dockside examination by the Coast Guard, the company does not appear to be providing special Hazmat equipment for the ad hoc cleanup crews.

"We are not seeing correct personal protection equipment," said Clint Guidry, secretary of the Louisiana Shrimp Association, who touted his own experience with toxins from working on oil rigs before he became a fisherman.


The fishermen who are being used here are also scared of losing their part time jobs doing this if they speak out, since they have already lost their fishing jobs.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by webpirate
I'm not one to hark on chemtrails, but here is a pic of actually that. Spraying chemicals over the gulf.


Is this the same chemtrails they spray over cities in order to try to hide smog levels?

Does it work on smog or only on oily water?



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
reply to post by webpirate
 


Well


Why aren't they all using respirators out there?

Benzene, Gasoline, Diesel, acetone, propane, methane, xylene, butane and so on are all evaporating at the same time out there. You'd have to be mad to not have lung protection.


I totally agree! I was wondering the same thing. The smell has to be so strong. How do you get away from it if you are cleaning it up?



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by dzonatas

Originally posted by webpirate
I'm not one to hark on chemtrails, but here is a pic of actually that. Spraying chemicals over the gulf.


Is this the same chemtrails they spray over cities in order to try to hide smog levels?

Does it work on smog or only on oily water?


I never truly put much stock in chemtrails. I know they are trying to control the weather in places at times, but I never really believed much about the other claims we hear so much about on here and other places.

However, after seeing that pic and reading the article, that's exactly the same thing I thought about. Spraying the air for similar things.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 07:56 PM
link   
reply to post by JRho900
 


The way I read it, the fishermen are stuck between a rock and a hard place. They can't fish to earn an income. They are being paid to use their boats in the cleanup, so they are getting some work. They aren't being given any protective equipment though.

And they are afraid they will lose the only work they are getting, or will possibly be getting for many years to come if they even mention anything about not having the proper safety devices.

They are just trying to tough it out to try to squeak out a living since their usual means of supporting themselves and their families has probably been permanently been taken away from them.

I totally agree they should be using them. But they should also be supplied with them.
I can also see their point of view about the other though too......

[edit on 25-5-2010 by webpirate]



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 08:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by webpirate
reply to post by irishchic
 

Yeah. If I remember correctly benzene used to be in paint thinner. It was removed from there eventually because it was a carcinogen. It is also in cigarette smoke. If this is what part of their dispersant is then it would not be good thing at all.
We'd probably be better off with the oil slick than massive amounts of benzene.


Actually the benzene is in the crude oil that is leaking. If its in the dispersants also that's double plus bad. wiki.answers.com...



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 08:09 PM
link   
There is a video and more info on the NALCO website: Corexit Technology

You probably want to read this:

Statement by EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson from Press Conference on Dispersant Use in the Gulf of Mexico with U.S. Coast Guard Rear Admiral Landry (PDF)


* The steps we have taken are in full recognition of our tradeoffs.
o We know that dispersants are less toxic than oil.
o We know that surface use of dispersants decreases the
risks to shorelines and organisms at the surface.
o And we know that dispersants breakdown over weeks
rather than remaining for several years as untreated oil
might.
o After testing and authorizing dispersant use underwater,
we also remain optimistic that we are achieving similar
results with the use of less chemicals.
* We have put in place an extensive monitoring network to ensure
the health of the air and water here. We have numerous
stationary and mobile air monitors throughout the region –
including a mobile unit that I personally inspected and toured
today.
* To ensure the fullest level of transparency, all of the data we
collect is being posted on www.epa.gov/bpspill as soon as we
gather and analyze it.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 08:33 PM
link   
reply to post by webpirate
 


Yes BP should be providing them with the proper safety equipment. They do need the work. I would assume they have more heart and soul into the clean up than BP every will.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 08:46 PM
link   
Since the dispersant breaks up the oil can it make its way further inland, even possibly in to the water that is drank? What about the fact that the wind could blow it futher inland? Those working on the beaches cleaning it up should be well protected with suits and respirators. Treating poison with poison - OMG what next.

My heart goes out to the people and wildlife affected by this disaster.



new topics

top topics



 
6

log in

join