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Seeking advice on my BOB

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posted on May, 25 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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Hi, here is a list of the things kept inside my bug-out bag (BOB). Constructive comments are encouraged. Thanks!

SAS Survival Guide
Bandana
Leather Gloves
Multi-tool
Compass
50 ft. nylon paracord
Emergency Radio w/ flashlight
Large first-aid kit
Water filter bottle
Water tablets
Poncho
Firestarter
Bar of Soap
Emergency Food Rations
Jar of Honey

There are 15 items. What am I missing that would be crucial?





posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:06 AM
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Medium sized blanket. It sounds like you could fit one in.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:08 AM
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One of those wind up radios could do you some service.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:11 AM
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There are a lot of good sources on BOB contents here on some older ATS threads.

Just from glancing at your list:
Add:
tinder (multiple types: cotton balls soaked in vaseline and film canisters filled with dryer lint work for me)

I would consider adding a larger fixed blade knife to your kit as well. My preference is an ESEE RC-4. ESEE used to be Rat Cutlery. In addition to knives, they also sell esee kits, and have an excellent website full of good info.
Stout fixed blades can do many jobs that a small folding blade cannot.

I always keep headlights handy for jobs that require both hands.

Emergency candles burn long and steady.

Multifuel backpacking stoves such as an MSR whisperlite burn white gas, kerosene and unleaded gasoline.

Mechanical water filters are great. Save the tablets for when things really get rough. Katadyn Hiker filter is excellent, portable and reliable.

Anyway, keep looking and build your kit over time. Much of my stuff came straight out of my camping backpack or out of my sailboat. I keep everything in an older Gregory internal frame backpack.

Good luck and have fun putting your kit together. It will certainly give you piece of mind if the need ever arises.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:17 AM
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Oh (B)ug (O)ut (Bag), Bob

I swear I thought you meant Bob (B)attery (O)perated (B)oyfriend



Sorry my mistake.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:19 AM
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An honest question if I might though. With you having a copy of the SAS Survival book I am assuming that your skills are limited. Get out and get some dirt time. Knowledge in your head from experience is worth 100 times that in a book and weighs nothing. The more that you know the less that you need.
You might also consider a sierra cup or something in which to cook, a hatchet or a pocket chainsaw [ not the flimsy wire saw ]. So much depends on the size of your pack and your experience level.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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I actually put vitamin packs in mine. Each pack contains about 8 vitamins that are suppose to help you out if you aren't able to eat healthy at the time. Just an idea I suppose.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:46 AM
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Industrial glow sticks. 15-20 would be good. One glow stick lasts twelve hours. If I am remembering correctly there are some that may last 36 hours, but they aren't as bright.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
An honest question if I might though. With you having a copy of the SAS Survival book I am assuming that your skills are limited. Get out and get some dirt time. Knowledge in your head from experience is worth 100 times that in a book and weighs nothing. The more that you know the less that you need.
You might also consider a sierra cup or something in which to cook, a hatchet or a pocket chainsaw [ not the flimsy wire saw ]. So much depends on the size of your pack and your experience level.

respectfully

reluctantpawn


I cou;dn't have said it better. The more you know the less you will depend on things that need energy such as a flashlight. One of the things no one should ever be without is a large knife or kukri and a stone to keep it sharp.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 11:53 AM
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Maybe you should check out one of the other 9,000 duplicate threads on "hey guise you like my bag?". But yeah, ditch the honey bring a toothbrush.



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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Jibeho is right. A multi-tool is no substitute for a good fixed blade knife. Throw in a flashlight, a canteen cup (stainless steel) and a good water filter.
I see you have a compass, how about a map?

A set of old electric guitar strings make great snares and weigh nothing.

Was a rain poncho/shelter half on your list?

For my money I wouldn't go anywhere without a firearm. A 9mm handgun or perhaps a .22 takedown rifle and a few hundred rounds of ammo.

Here's my thread on B.O.B.s if you're interested;

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on May, 25 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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Flat pack duct tape - great for patching up a hole in a shoe temporarily or a tent that has a leak.

Double or triple up on the fire starters, have more than one method to use. My GetHomeBag has several containers of waterproof matches and a magnesium starter just to be safe.

Tarp - if you can strap this to the outside of your pack or somehow affix it do it; I didn't see any shelter building stuff in your list beyond your poncho, and believe me you want something to keep you out of the elements as much as possible; exposure can kill you just as dead as hypothermia, starvation or an angry momma bear.

Also consider throwing in a second set of clothes, if the ones you are wearing become wet for whatever reason you need to be able to get out of them and into something dry pronto in cold weather.



posted on May, 26 2010 @ 06:34 PM
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Like other people have said it depends on the size of your bag. I would like to add that it also depends on how much you can hump and for how long. The more weight you have strapped to you back the more calories you burn and if you weigh a 145 lbs and are carying a pack that weighs 60-70 lbs (about the weight of my BOB) that is going to take a lot out of you. The best thing for you to do is explain your bug out plan and go from there. It really all depends on what type of enviroment you are going to go to. If it is the deep forest you will need different things than if you plan on bugging out to an urban enviroment. Just make sure you have a couple of pairs of dry socks and underwear, some tinder, a couple of knives, and I wouldn't bug our with out a decent boonie. If you fill us in on a general idea of your bug out plan we could probably be able to help you out further.

reply to post by Helig
 


Helig I thought you were going to post an update on your nice GHB?



posted on May, 26 2010 @ 06:43 PM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

This is a great thread and this guy pretty much has it down. My personal b.o.b is an almost exact copy of that with a few things switched around.



posted on May, 26 2010 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by wolfwood290
 



garbage bag(s).
ziplock bags.
wallet sized plastic fresnel lens.
mosquito net head cover.
fishing string and hooks.
10'x10' plastic sheeting.

all lightweight compact items



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 12:05 AM
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Pick up a copy of native plants and wildlife. This book should be illustrated and tell when and where wildlife most often migrate (for hunting purposes) and what plants are edible, medicinal, or poisonous. Also, pick up a book on indians in your area. Find out what they used to survive. For example, I have a book about the ethnobotany of western washington and what the indigenous people used these plants for. It's a plethora of information. It talks about plants that were used as food sources, medicines, tools, homes, canoes, and woven into clothes. It also mentions how the plant was prepared. Like cedar was used for everything here. they used it for their homes, canoes, took inner bark and shredded it to make into thread and wove it into clothes, and I believe they used some of it to bathe with and as medicine.



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by collietta
 


At the big book stores you can get fold up laminated 'pamphlets' for edible plants, medicinal plants, etc. From Waterford publications.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on May, 27 2010 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


Yep. It's in the hiking, local or outdoor section depending on your bookstore and where you live. I prefered the two books over the laminated flyers because there's more information. The ethnobotany book isn't big. It was written in the 1940's for UW and it is a compilation of interviews with tribal members. Hopefully the OP can find one like it for his area. The other book I have for wildlife, is a book designed for hiking. It's not heavy or too bulky. I picked it up to keep in my car so when we go on road trips, my daughter and I could look and learn about all wildlife in our area. It has everything from plants, to animals, to bugs, to sea creatures.

[edit on 27-5-2010 by collietta]



posted on Jun, 2 2010 @ 07:02 PM
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I think some small, full of info books on plants would be good....anyone have suggestions?



posted on Jun, 2 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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For you women out their ......dont forget your femine protection, yes it will bog down the BOB......but get just enough until you can supply yourself with more....sorry guys, but you dont think about OUR problems!



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