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NEWS: UN Resolution On Iraq Passes 15-0

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posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 03:48 PM
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The UN resolution which recognises the new Iraqi government and will officially end the occupation on the 30th June has been passed 15-0 by the UN Security Council.
 


As I mentioned in this story the two main contentious points are the mandate for military presence and the ultimate political control of military operations in Iraq.

The issue of control of military forces has been settled by this careful wording:

- Recognising also the importance of the consent of the sovereign Government of Iraq for the presence of the multinational force and of close coordination between the multinational force and that government.


Full Text:

- Welcoming the beginning of a new phase in Iraq's transition to a democratically elected government, and looking forward to the end of the occupation and the assumption of full responsibility and authority by a fully sovereign and independent Interim Government of Iraq by 30 June 2004.

- Recalling all of its previous relevant resolutions on Iraq.

- Reaffirming the independence, sovereignty, unity, and territorial integrity of Iraq.

- Reaffirming the right of the Iraqi people freely to determine their own political future and control their own natural resources.

- Recognising the importance of international support, particularly that of countries in the region, Iraq's neighbours, and regional organisations, for the people of Iraq in their efforts to achieve security and prosperity, and noting that the successful implementation of this resolution will contribute to regional stability.

- Welcoming the efforts of the Special Advisor to the Secretary-General to assist the people of Iraq in achieving the formation of the Interim Government of Iraq, as set out in the letter of the Secretary-General of 8 June 2004.

- Taking note of the dissolution of the Governing Council of Iraq, and welcoming the progress made in implementing the arrangements for Iraq's political transition referred to in resolution 1511 (2003) of 16 October 2003.

- Welcoming the commitment of the Interim Government of Iraq to work towards a federal, democratic, pluralist and unified Iraq, in which there is full respect for political and human rights.

- Stressing the need for all parties to respect and protect Iraq's archaeological, historical, cultural and religious heritage, Affirming the importance of the rule of law, respect for human rights including the rights of women, fundamental freedoms, and democracy including free and fair elections.

- Recalling the establishment of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) on 14 August 2003, and affirming that the United Nations should play a leading role in assisting the Iraqi people and government in the formation of institutions for representative government.

- Recognising that international support for restoration of stability and security is essential to the well-being of the people of Iraq as well as to the ability of all concerned to carry out their work on behalf of the people of Iraq, and welcoming Member State contributions in this regard under resolution 1483 (2003) of 22 May 2003 and resolution 1511 (2003).

- Recalling the report provided by the United States to the Security Council on 16 April 2004 on the efforts and progress made by the multinational force.

- Recognising the request conveyed in the letter of 5 June 2004 from the Prime Minister of the Interim Government of Iraq to the President of the Council, which is annexed to this resolution, to retain the presence of the multinational force.

- Recognising also the importance of the consent of the sovereign Government of Iraq for the presence of the multinational force and of close coordination between the multinational force and that government.

- Welcoming the willingness of the multinational force to continue efforts to contribute to the maintenance of security and stability in Iraq in support of the political transition, especially for upcoming elections, and to provide security for the UN presence in Iraq, as described in the letter of 5 June 2004 from the United States Secretary of State to the President of the Council, which is annexed to this resolution.

- Noting the commitment of all forces promoting the maintenance of security and stability in Iraq to act in accordance with international law, including obligations under international humanitarian law, and cooperate with relevant international organisations.

- Affirming the importance of international assistance in reconstruction and development of the Iraqi economy.

- Recognising the benefits to Iraq of the immunities and privileges enjoyed by Iraqi oil revenues and by the Development Fund for Iraq, and noting the importance of providing for continued disbursements of this fund by the Interim Government of Iraq and its successors upon dissolution of the Coalition Provisional Authority.

- Determining that the situation in Iraq continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security.

- Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations:

1. Endorses the formation of a sovereign Interim Government of Iraq, as presented on 1 June 2004, which will assume full responsibility and authority by 30 June 2004 for governing Iraq while refraining from taking any actions affecting Iraq's destiny beyond the limited interim period until an elected Transitional Government of Iraq assumes office as envisaged in paragraph four below;

2. Welcomes that, also by 30 June 2004, the occupation will end and the Coalition Provisional Authority will cease to exist, and that Iraq will reassert its full sovereignty;

3. Reaffirms the right of the Iraqi people freely to determine their own political future and to exercise full authority and control over their financial and natural resources;

4. Endorses the proposed timetable for Iraq's political transition to democratic government including:
(a) formation of the sovereign Interim Government of Iraq that will assume governing responsibility and authority by 30 June 2004; (b) convening of a national conference reflecting the diversity of Iraqi society; and
(c) holding of direct democratic elections by 31 December 2004 if possible, and in no case later than 31 January 2005, to a Transitional National Assembly, which will, inter alia, have responsibility for forming a Transitional Government of Iraq and drafting a permanent constitution for Iraq leading to a constitutionally-elected government by 31 December 2005;

5. Invites the Government of Iraq to consider how the convening of an international meeting could support the above process, and notes that it would welcome such a meeting to support the Iraqi political transition and Iraqi recovery, to the benefit of the Iraqi people, and in the interest of stability in the region.

6. Calls on all Iraqis to implement these arrangements peaceably and in full, and on all States and relevant organisations to support such implementation.

7. Decides that in implementing, as circumstances permit, their mandate to assist the Iraqi people and government, the Special Representative of the Secretary General and the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), as requested by the Government of Iraq, shall: (a) play a leading role to: (i) assist in the convening, during the month of July 2004, of a national conference to select a Consultative Council; (ii) advise and support the Interim Government of Iraq, the Independent Electoral Commission of Iraq, and the Transitional National Assembly on the process for holding elections; (iii) promote national dialogue and consensus-building on the drafting of a national constitution by the people of Iraq; (b) and also: (i) advise the Government of Iraq in the development of effective civil and social services; (ii) contribute to the coordination and delivery of reconstruction, development, and humanitarian assistance; (iii) promote the protection of human rights, national reconciliation, and judicial and legal reform in order to strengthen the rule of law in Iraq; and (iv) advise and assist the Government of Iraq on initial planning for the eventual conduct of a comprehensive census.

8. Welcomes ongoing efforts by the incoming Interim Government of Iraq to develop Iraqi security forces, including the Iraqi armed forces, operating under the authority of the Interim Government of Iraq and its successors, which will progressively play a greater role and ultimately assume full responsibility for the maintenance of security and stability in Iraq;

9. Notes that the presence of the multinational force in Iraq is at the request of the incoming Interim Government of Iraq and therefore reaffirms the authorisation for the multinational force under unified command established under resolution 1511 (2003) having regard to the letters annexed to this resolution;

10. Decides that the multinational force shall have the authority to take all necessary measures to contribute to the maintenance of security and stability in Iraq in accordance with the letters annexed to this resolution expressing, inter alia, the Iraqi request for the continued presence of the multinational force and setting out its tasks, including by preventing and deterring terrorism, so that, inter alia, the United Nations can fulfil its role in assisting the Iraqi people as outlined in paragraph seven above and the Iraqi people can implement freely and without intimidation the timetable and programme for the political process and benefit from reconstruction and rehabilitation activities;

11. Welcomes in this regard the letters annexed to this resolution stating, inter alia, that arrangements are being put in place to establish a security partnership between the multinational force and the sovereign Government of Iraq and to ensure coordination between the two, and noting also in this regard that Iraqi security forces are responsible to appropriate Iraqi ministers, that the Government of Iraq has authority to commit Iraqi security forces to the multinational force to engage in operations with it, and that the security structures described in the letters will serve as the fora for the multinational force and Iraqi government to reach agreement on the full range of fundamental security and policy issues, including policy on sensitive offensive operations, and will ensure full partnership between Iraqi forces and the multinational force, through close coordination and consultation;

12. Decides further that the mandate for the multinational force shall be reviewed at the request of the Government of Iraq or twelve months from the date of this resolution, and that this mandate shall expire upon the completion of the political process set out in paragraph four above, and declares that it will terminate this mandate earlier if requested by the Government of Iraq;

13. Notes the intention, set out in the annexed letter from the United States Secretary of State, to create a distinct entity under unified command of the multinational force with a dedicated mission to provide security for the UN presence in Iraq, recognises that the implementation of measures to provide security for staff members of the United Nations system working in Iraq would require significant resources, and calls upon Member States and relevant organisations to provide such resources, including contributions to that entity;

14. Recognises that the multinational force will also assist in building the capability of the Iraqi security forces and institutions, through a program of recruitment, training, equipping, mentoring and monitoring;

15. Requests Member States and international and regional organisations to contribute assistance to the multinational force, including military forces, as agreed with the Government of Iraq, to help meet the needs of the Iraqi people for security and stability, humanitarian and reconstruction assistance, and to support the efforts of UNAMI;

16. Emphasises the importance of developing effective Iraqi police, border enforcement, and Facilities Protection Service, under the control of the Interior Ministry of Iraq, and, in the case of the Facilities Protection Service, other Iraqi ministries, for the maintenance of law, order, and security, including combating terrorism, and requests Member States and international organisations to assist the Government of Iraq in building the capability of these Iraqi institutions;

17. Condemns all acts of terrorism in Iraq, reaffirms the obligations of Member States under resolutions 1373 (2001) of 28 September 2001, 1267 (1999) 15 October 1999, 1333 (2000) of 19 December 2000, 1390 (2002) of 16 January 2002, 1455 (2003) of 17 January 2003, and 1526 (2004) of 30 January 2004, and other relevant international obligations with respect, inter alia, to terrorist activities in and from Iraq or against its citizens, and specifically reiterates its call upon Member States to prevent the transit of terrorists to and from Iraq, arms for terrorists, and financing that would support terrorists, and reemphasises the importance of strengthening the cooperation of the countries of the region, particularly neighbours of Iraq, in this regard;

18. Recognises that the Interim Government of Iraq will assume the primary role in coordinating international assistance to Iraq;

19. Welcomes efforts by Member States and international organisations to respond in support of requests by the Interim Government of Iraq to provide technical and expert assistance, while Iraq is rebuilding administrative capacity;

20. Reiterates its request that Member States, international financial institutions and other organisations strengthen their efforts to assist the people of Iraq in the reconstruction and development of the Iraqi economy, including by providing international experts and necessary resources through a coordinated program of donor assistance;

21. Decides that the prohibitions related to the sale or supply to Iraq of arms and related materiel under previous resolutions shall not apply to arms or related materiel required by the Government of Iraq or the multinational force to serve the purposes of this resolution, stresses the importance for all States to abide strictly by them, and notes the significance of Iraq's neighbours in this regard, and calls upon the government of Iraq and the multinational force each to ensure that appropriate implementation procedures are in place;

22. Notes that nothing in the preceding paragraph affects the prohibitions on or obligations of States related to items specified in paragraphs 8 and 12 of resolution 687 (1991) of 3 April 1991 or activities described in paragraph 3(f) of resolution 707 (1991) of 15 August 1991, and reaffirms its intention to revisit the mandates of the United Nations Monitoring, Verification, and Inspection Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency;

23. Calls on Member States and international organisations to respond to Iraqi requests to assist Iraqi efforts to integrate Iraqi veterans and former militia members into Iraqi society;

24. Notes that, upon dissolution of the Coalition Provisional Authority, the funds in the Development Fund for Iraq shall be disbursed solely at the direction of the Government of Iraq, and decides that the Development Fund for Iraq shall be utilized in a transparent and equitable manner and through the Iraqi budget including to satisfy outstanding obligations against the Development Fund for Iraq, that the arrangements for the depositing of proceeds from export sales of petroleum, petroleum products, and natural gas established in paragraph 20 of resolution 1483 (2003) shall continue to apply, that the International Advisory and Monitoring Board shall continue its activities in monitoring the Development Fund for Iraq and shall include as an additional full voting member a duly qualified individual designated by the Government of Iraq and that appropriate arrangements shall be made for the continuation of deposits of the proceeds referred to in paragraph 21 of resolution 1483 (2003);

25. Decides further that the provisions in the above paragraph for the deposit of proceeds into the DFI and for the role of the IAMB shall be reviewed at the request of the Transitional Government of Iraq or twelve months from the date of this resolution, and shall expire upon the completion of the political process set out in paragraph four above;

26. Decides that, in connection with the dissolution of the Coalition Provisional Authority, the Interim Government of Iraq and its successors shall assume the rights, responsibilities and obligations relating to the Oil for Food Program that were transferred to the Authority, including all operational responsibility for the Program and any obligations undertaken by the Authority in connection with such responsibility, and responsibility for ensuring independently authenticated confirmation that goods have been delivered, and further decides that, following a 120-day transition period from the date of adoption of this resolution, the Interim Government of Iraq and its successors shall assume responsibility for certifying delivery of goods under contracts prioritized in accordance with that resolution, and that such certification shall be deemed to constitute the independent authentication required for the release of funds associated with such contracts, consulting as appropriate to ensure the smooth implementation of these arrangements;

27. Further decides that the provisions of paragraph 22 of resolution 1483 (2003) shall continue to apply, except that the privileges and immunities provided in that paragraph shall not apply concerning any final judgment arising out of a contractual obligation entered into by Iraq after 30 June 2004;

28. Welcomes the commitments of many creditors, including those of the Paris Club, to identify ways to reduce substantially Iraq's sovereign debt, calls on Member States, as well as intemationa1 and regional organisations, to support the Iraq reconstruction effort, urges the international financial institutions and bilateral donors to take the immediate steps necessary to provide their full range of loans and other financial assistance and arrangements to Iraq, recognises that the Interim Government of Iraq will have the authority to conclude and implement such agreements and other arrangements as may be necessary in this regard, and requests creditors, institutions and donors to work as a priority on these matters with the Interim Government of Iraq and its successors;

29. Recalls the continuing obligations of Member States to freeze and transfer certain funds, assets, and economic resources to the Development Fund for Iraq in accordance with paragraphs 19 and 23 of resolution 1483 (2003) and with resolution 1518 (2003) of 24 November 2003;

30. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Council within three months from the date of this resolution on UNAMI operations in Iraq, and on a quarterly basis thereafter on the progress made towards national elections and fulfilment of all UNAMI's responsibilities;

31. Requests that the United States, on behalf of the multinational force, report to the Council within three months from the date of this resolution on the efforts and progress of this force, and on a quarterly basis thereafter;

32. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Other ATSNN stories on the negotiations before this resolution:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 8-6-2004 by John bull 1]

[edit on 6-12-2004 by Valhall]




posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 05:37 PM
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Here we go again! Why do I say that? Just read the articles. My opinion is that after a week or two when the U.S. leaves Iraq. Something bad is going to happen. It also states in article 3. that the "Iraqi people freely to determine their own political future and to exercise full authority and control over their financial and natural resources". Anyone see a major conflict with oil? Hmmm....



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 06:52 AM
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So, what does this mean in regards to security? Does the coalition remain in Iraq at the request of the new government for purposes of security? And who has control over the troops?




posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 07:45 AM
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Reaffirming the right of the Iraqi people freely to determine their own political future and control their own natural resources.


Well that ain't gonna work. What if they decide they want their political future to include an Islamist government?

jsobecky:

Does the coalition remain in Iraq at the request of the new government for purposes of security? And who has control over the troops?


100,000 USA troops stay in Iraq till 2006 and the Iraqis have no say in what they do, nor are they prosecutable under Iraqi law.

Sounds like a party.



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 07:49 AM
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"Well that ain't gonna work. What if they decide they want their political future to include an Islamist government? "

They're a nation of Muslims.

a ) why would they not want an islamic government ?
b ) what would be wrong with an Islamic government ?



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 08:11 AM
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Simon: I mean specifically a non-secular one. Similar to Iran but mainly non-democratic.

While I think Islam and democracy might be a good fit, I also know a bit of history and the Middle East, and you can't just kickstart a democracy by force. Especially when nobody in the region trusts the US and their intentions.



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 08:12 AM
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First dont think will be allowed to be an islamist government for 2 reasons:

1) u have sunny and shia in iraq so that will cause more friction

2) dont think usa removed sadam hussein for a worse islamic government, if usa meant what they have said than iraq should be a democratic country not a dogmatic country like saudi arabia.

Not that im big fan of bush actually vice versa but the removal of saddam was necessary, someone that kills one million of its own people deserve to be punished, but not in the way he went about it. too rushed



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 08:19 AM
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If they are to have true freedom they should be able to decide what they want.

If they want a freakin donkey as their head of state, they ought to be able to.

This is NOT exactly the United States' backyard here. I could see if it was a neighbouring country or even anywhere in Central or South America, this is HALF A WORLD AWAY.

Let them elect who they want, and think about what "freedom" actually means. It shouldn't come with so many strings attached.

And if you blame actual Iraqis for Saddam's abuses and his government (that they let it happen), you'd better hope that the rest of the world doesn't equate YOUR opinions with those of your President, who is one of, if not the most, hated man in the world. That America "let it happen" when all these pre-emptive strikes started.



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 08:32 AM
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Jakomo im not from usa or an american citizen im from eastern europe, and know what dicatorships are, and countries are in transition thats the worse times for that country because the strongest takes over and than decides how things will take effect. I agree with ur opinion of democracy, but backyard isnt anymore the term in the global village, now a terrorsist can jump on plane and strike u within few hours and u hardly expect it. the world is much more smaller these days than it was 50 years ago, the perceptions and mentality have changed and they need to change , is sad that the world economy get affected by oil prizes when oil is changing the climate we live and the world we live. If 20 years ago there was war in another continent we wouldnt give a monkey, but now it affects u aswell regardless where u are and what little lives we live.

[edit on 9-6-2004 by detjon]



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by Jakomo

Simon: I mean specifically a non-secular one. Similar to Iran but mainly non-democratic.

While I think Islam and democracy might be a good fit, I also know a bit of history and the Middle East, and you can't just kickstart a democracy by force. Especially when nobody in the region trusts the US and their intentions.



I would have to agree with that. Just the tiny little part of Democracy that has something to do with a Majority, usually a Major Majority at that, wanting the same thing and thereby Voting it it in a Fair and Civilized manner, seems to me like something that happens on it's own without having to be forced into play, ya know. I mean 'A Forced Democracy' IMO, does qualify as an Oxymoron for sure. Would anyone else agree with that??

Another thing I would like someone to explain to me. They use the term "Iraq's transition to a democratically elected government.' But just exactly how Democratically Elected is this New Group of Government Officials and what method was used to Elect them??

Maybe it's just me. Perhaps I'm the crazy one here, but I find it strange that in the middle of a freakin' war zone, within a region that hasn't known a peaceful day in generations, where advanced society and technology to most people means they've reached what other countries had in the 50's, that setting up a fair and properly developed system of Democratic Voting has actually been possible. I mean seriously, can anyone explain the Democratically Elected part of this whole thing, cause I don't remember anything about all the Iraqi People going to the Voting Booth on Election day to Vote in Anything. Did I just miss it, or am I correct in that such an election never happened?



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 09:29 AM
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I don't think one could organise a vote as we have it. I believe that representatives from different factions ( Sunni, Shiite, different tribal elders, war lords, business men etc ) have been brought together as representing the best interests of many groups of people around Iraq.

They are then being asked to agree on a leader and a set of democratic laws that they can all respect.

In many ways this is the only way you could start to put a country like Iraq back together, If you just had a vote, someone would rig it, if they didn't, different factions within Iraq would disagree with the result.

This way people they already follow and respect are being asked to choose who they will ultimately follow and respect.

From that point other party's will be able to evolve and then eventually a true election as we know it can take place.

Frankly I'm impressed, its a pretty even handed way of sorting it out. It should also grant the area a little stability for a few years until the people get a proper vote.

That's when the real # storm will hit.



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 11:43 AM
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And the hits keep comin!

The US has now officially decided to show the world that it gets to pick and choose what candidates can run. Go McDemocracy!

I'm sure your average Iraqi is too stupid to realize they're getting shafted, right? You'd better hope so.

politics.guardian.co.uk...


Moqtada al-Sadr, the radical Shia leader whose militiamen have been fighting the US occupation forces in several Iraqi cities, was banned yesterday from standing in Iraq's forthcoming democratic elections.

Paul Bremer, the US administrator in Iraq, signed an order stating that, with immediate effect, members of illegal militias "will be barred from holding political office for three years after leaving their illegal organisation".

Even if Mr Sadr disbanded his Mahdi Army in the next few weeks it would be too late for him to join Iraq's political process and contest the elections, due in January.



posted on Jun, 9 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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Its irrelevant anyways, since the Kurds are not going to back this UN resolution. So by the looks of it, we have a civil war brewing, just like Serbia and Chechnya (spelling ?).

The Kurds having more, US bought firepower, will likely start building artillery emplacements close to the outskirts (or at least in range of) Baghdad. And once the US gives the Kurds the "green light" I expect a massive civil war to begin.

Updated 6/11

www.cnn.com...

Now the #es are killing each other, looks like civil war is brewing not only with the Kurds but within the same ethinic factions as well. This looks like its going to get very interesting in Iraq. Oh and did anyone read yesterday about the police force in Najaf ASKING for US troops to come in and fight off the militia men, and the US saying NOPE, sorry buddy but you will have to learn how to handle this situation on your own. But, we will give you ammo and weapons.

Sounds like a great plan to me, give them all the guns and ammo they need to kill each other. So that maybe someday they will wise up that its Iraqi killing Iraqi. But hey we can not get people in the US to stop killing each other so how in the world can we expect people in another country to grow up morally and take responsibility for their fellow country men. Ganbangers YOU ROCK, you prove to the whole world us humans are pittiful.


[edit on 11-6-2004 by robertfenix]



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