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Masons - Reasons?

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posted on May, 28 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I am very interested but seems I can not U2U yet. Will have to post up more as I just joined ATS thou I have been on here reading up for a couple of months.




posted on May, 28 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by Saurus
reply to post by aMason
 


@ aMason: I apologize for my comment. It is not my place to judge.
We get so many imposters her, I reacted too hastily to a comment which I may have misinterpreted.


Are there really that many imposters on here? Thats ok, maybe I didnt explain myself as well as I should have. I like the feeling of brotherhood, regardless of where I am......that is what I should have typed. I just recently joined the boards, been reading for a while though....Im a Mason in Indiana, also Scottish Rite. Part of the reason I did decide to participate on the boards is because of all of the anti-masonry and plain misinformation on here.....



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 09:50 AM
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I joined because:
1.My grandfather, who I always knew as a good man was a mason.
2. I liked the idea of a group of men who took an oath to help others and look after each other
3. I have a great interest in metaphysic and esoteric studies
4. I believe that bad associations spoil useful habits. I also believe that associating with a group of good men striving to make themselves better could only make me a better man and help guide me on my own personal path to enlightenment.

After I passed the third degree is when I found many more reasons to love Masonry. It is truly a wonderful experience and I look forward to even more "light"

A better bunch of guys I could never have met at one time. Also, it does make me feel good that as a worldwide brotherhood, I could find fellowship in just about any city I travel to.

I hope that you join for the right reasons and that you enjoy it as much as I do. I have been a Master Mason for less than a year, so I am still like a sponge trying to soak it all in.

Selfish? Well, if seeking to make yourself a better father, husband, son and to learn more about the arts, history, etc is a selfish endeavor..many of us are guilty.



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 02:05 AM
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I have a friend that had one of the Masons rings that they wear.. like the top head people.. I will never know for sure cause I am a GIRL but .. man I wish there was a Masoness group or something for women
[[[(>_



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by NickyBlue
I have a friend that had one of the Masons rings that they wear.. like the top head people.. I will never know for sure cause I am a GIRL but .. man I wish there was a Masoness group or something for women
[[[(>_



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by NickyBlue
I have a friend that had one of the Masons rings that they wear.. like the top head people.. I will never know for sure cause I am a GIRL but .. man I wish there was a Masoness group or something for women
[[[(>_



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 
After browsing a few Masonic websites I have to wonder how a concentration of that much arcane knowledge could not be superficially perceived to be an occult conspiracy. Mind you, I don't subscribe to the 'secret-masonic-world-domination' belief. But the Pythagorean Mysteries and Magickal Grimoires that are referenced 'as a refutation' of the satanic accusations are impressive and lead to more questions that don't get asked or answered.
THe Freemasonry websites present a huge amount of working knowledge regarding arcane symbolism, on par with what someone would find on any new age website. So, you're not Pagans. Got that. But some of your members seem to know more about those olde practices than many self-styled Pagans that I've met. Kind of a head scratcher.

1. Are you guys style after Enlightenment-era thinkers?
2. If you're aware of the arbitrary and harmless nature of symbols like stars and triangles and practices like Gnosticism and New Ageism, why do so many of your members seem to hail from ultra-conservative sectors? Seems like you'd be sympathetic to some of the Hippies/New Agers?

Crystals, Triangles, Light, Brotherhood, Easter Wisdom. It kind of all seems like the same kettle of fish to this Cowan.

Thanks in advance for you response.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 06:54 PM
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I have asked to become a Mason also. Soon I will become one because the head of the lodge have welcomed me in. It's really cool, I even got a Mason magazine. I have numerous relatives who are Masons. That's were the influence arrived from for joining.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by Romantic_Rebel]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 07:12 PM
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Hi OP,

I just joined about 2 Months ago!

There were a few reasons why,

1/ I have been interested in Freemasonry for a while, the Symbology, History etc

2/ I was interested in joining because I could meet other good people, make friends and be around honesty and brotherhood.

Since I have joined, everyone i've met there have been fantastic. they are the friendliest, wisest people i've ever met. No matter what your job is, how much $$$ you have etc, everyone is treated as equal.

Treating people as equals is an important value for me and this is one of the best things about Freemasonry that i've seen so far.

It's also a great priveledge when you think that so many people over hundreds of years have gone through the same rituals you have!

g



[edit on 27-6-2010 by grantbeed]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 10:39 PM
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I joined for many reasons:

1) The Brotherhood. I travel quite often and no matter where I go, I always know I have Brothers I can visit with. At my home Lodge, I know my Brothers would fly to my side at my calling. I have grown to know many great men and I'm honored to call them friend and Brother.

2) Charity. It is a important principle to be charitable and its even dictated in the Bible to be charitable. Freemasonry gives millions to charity foundations

3) History. Freemasonry has an interesting history shrouded in mystery and some lost with time. I love to research and read everything pertinent to Freemasonry and its beliefs.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 07:34 AM
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Originally posted by plainPlaidplain


1. Are you guys style after Enlightenment-era thinkers?


Yes. In fact, it was those guys who gave us Freemasonry in its modern form, at least for the most part.


2. If you're aware of the arbitrary and harmless nature of symbols like stars and triangles and practices like Gnosticism and New Ageism, why do so many of your members seem to hail from ultra-conservative sectors? Seems like you'd be sympathetic to some of the Hippies/New Agers?


Old hippie here.

I don't think that "so many" of our members are ultra-conservative. For every conservative in Masonry, there's certainly a liberal around. When we become Masons, we do so with the understanding that it will "not interfere with our religious or political opinions, be they what may". Masons have been, and are, representatives of all sorts of varying political theories: Libertarians, socialists, conservatives, liberals, greens, etc., have all been members of out fraternity.

As an individual who has always stood solidly on the left, I would have no desire to affiliate with Freemasonry if the organization had a right wing agenda.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by plainPlaidplain
 


Pythagorean thinking is the basis of all modern math and geometry. It isn't a symbolic or religious thing, it is a scientific one.

Architecture and geometry is also a big part of Masonry, and it is a matter of history and roots, not symbology.

Yes, Ancient Masonry used a lot of symbology out of necessity to protect the craft and the members. Today we use it as a means of communicating "that which cannot be taught." Our Masonic degrees are acted out in a certain manner so that every movement and step and sound is significant. There is much more than just what is said.

For those who don't realize (including brothers) do some research on the floorwork. After I read through the following link a few dozen times, I convinced our active members to remodel our lodge and get our ratios correct and our symbology the way it belongs. The construction work led to several members learning more lectures, and other lodges begging to watch our degrees. The symbolism is important, but not for religion or mythology, it is important for science and history and communcation.

www.dcsymbols.com...



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I must admit, our lodge doesn't put as much emphasis on the floor work as is described in your link. I think it will take me some time to figure out what is being taught there, but it seems to be an extremely valuable link. Thanks very much.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Yes, there is a whole lot of info there, and I had to read through it literally about a dozen times over a month or so, before it really clicked in my head.

Pretty much everything that was known about astronomy and the motions of the planets and constellations and moon through our night sky is played out in the degree work.

When you combine Pythagoras with Astronomy and Ancient History and legend and lore and the knowledge of the wisest and most moral characters in our past, you really stumble upon a lot more information than is apparent at first glance! I am working to learn the FC lecture at this time, and we built all the props that go along with it in full-scale so the candidates can actually ascend the steps as the lecture is given.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:47 AM
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For those that are Brethren and those that are not, one of my reasons for joining can be summed up in the famous poem by Rudyard Kipling (The Mother Lodge), Brethren will understand.

Additionally, the experience can only make you a better person. However, you must also consider what it is you have to offer Freemasonry.

Good luck in your quest and, if you decide to take the plunge, I wish you well.

Fraternal Greetings to you all.

[edit on 29/6/2010 by TheLoneArcher]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:25 PM
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I'm not sure where the impression that Masons are ultra-conservative comes from.

My lodge has a number (especially lately) of artists, musicians, students, even a (GASP!) UNITARIAN!

I consider myself libertarian, but I don't discuss politics or religion with my Brothers so I don't know where they stand.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
I am working to learn the FC lecture at this time, and we built all the props that go along with it in full-scale so the candidates can actually ascend the steps as the lecture is given.


That is cool. We use a rug. It does get the point across, but steps and a porch would be way better. At our school of instruction this year I was informed that the second degree lecture is commonly known as the senior deacons part. Being the SD, I was a bit shocked to hear this. I think that lecture and the apron are my two favorite ones. Good luck learning all that.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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The basic requirements to be considered for membership as a Mason consist of two questions only. One need not elaborate upon their answers. These are simple yes or no questions:

- Do you believe in God?
- Do you believe in an Afterlife?

If you answer “no” to either question, the interview is over; you will never be considered for membership as a Mason. Masonry does not recruit. You have to seek Masonry out and ask to be considered for membership.

It is interesting to look at the people who belong to Masonry. Given the powerful people throughout history who have been Masons, Masonry’s two key questions become of interest: Why do the beliefs in God and an afterlife form the pillars through which one enters Masonry?

I will give you my answers. Although I am a Mason, I do not speak for Masonry, any of its concordant bodies, nor for any of my worthy brother Masons. I speak only for myself. Furthermore, I am not any kind of Masonic authority. Although I greatly admire the man and his work, I am hardly the Worshipful Albert Pike.

A person who believes in God and an afterlife is qualitatively different from a person who does not believe. I am not saying that believers are better than nonbelievers. All I am saying is that believers and nonbelievers are qualitatively different from one another in terms of Consciousness and identity.

If you believe in God and that you will continue on after this life, your state of Consciousness will be different from a person who considers that there is no God and that their life ends at death.

Simply put, belief in God and an afterlife are characteristics required to interact with the Transpersonal, Spiritual power -- and that is defined however you want. Masonry does not define it.

There is a spiritual World and groups such as Masonry open doors into that World. If one does not believe that a spiritual World exists then it is pointless for them to do spiritual work, particularly initiatory work focused on death, burial, and resurrection.

Such work aims to awaken the latent spiritual powers within the individual so that he or she can become available for even higher levels of spiritual instruction. These two requirements are not unique to Masonry but go back thousands of years into the Mystery Schools. One of the keys to activating inner power is based upon these beliefs being sincerely held and practiced.



posted on Jun, 30 2010 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by swiftsphinx
 


I'll go a step further and everytime I have ever admitted to this innate flaw in myself, people go crazy, but it is true, so I will say it again.

"Without a belief in God or an Afterlife, all things become carnal in nature, there are no consequences, and people will live by the law of the jungle. For my part, if it were not for God and the belief in something beyond this flesh and bone, I would certainly be a 'consumer' of everything. I would go buck wild, taking everything I wanted from anybody that was weaker than me. I would get my money's worth from these 80 years or so with no conscience or concept of other peoples feelings and worth."

I am an upstanding man and Mason, but without God and Masonry, I am pretty sure you would not want me in your neighborhood.

What I don't understand is how people can be proclaimed Atheists, and then still live by the rules of man? Why? Why waste your life conforming if there is no consequence after death?



posted on Jun, 30 2010 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
What I don't understand is how people can be proclaimed Atheists, and then still live by the rules of man? Why? Why waste your life conforming if there is no consequence after death?
That one's much easier, actually. And to be honest, I'm surprised that you don't already get it, because in my opinion, it was one of the first things I learned in Masonry:
You don't do the right thing because of any expectations of reward or recognition (or, in this case, fear of retribution or consequence); you do the right thing because it's the right thing to do. That simple. And it doesn't require the threat of fire & brimstone, or even the loss of everlasting beauty, to get someone to do the right thing.




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