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Teen Invents the High-Level EMP Attenuation System That Responds Instantaneously. What Do You Think?

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posted on May, 24 2010 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by LightFantastic
 


Great question!

Before the atoms of the semiconductors are exposed to those gradients, they are in what is called a quadrupole moment where the magnetic field propagation is not very effective the further away it is from the source of measurement. During an EMP the moment is coupled, which enhances the field.

To combat this, if the components needing protection are already in faraday cage, my systems will also have its own cage. Now you’re probably thinking that this will need a ground, in reality, it doesn’t. When the electromagnetic waves interact with the electrons of the atoms in the cage, this will also create a short DC voltage, just the same as the EMP.

This DC voltage is identical to the EMP and therefore, can also be attenuated by my system.




posted on May, 24 2010 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by macb6497
What I’m trying to do is to have this tested with a major EMP facility that could make a report and back up my statements of how my system responds.


That makes a lot of sense. It's far more economical to subject yours to an EMP from a huge capacitor bank that's already built, than to try to build such a huge capacitor bank from scratch. Good luck with that.

By the way, I see UL rates these surge protectors so you could ask them what their testing capabilities are, but they would charge you. Maybe if you're lucky you could find somebody to do the test for you for free.

Still looking forward to the second video.

[edit on 24-5-2010 by Arbitrageur]



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 07:35 AM
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reply to post by macb6497
 


Ok I have watched your video now and I am still non the wiser.

How about you have a resistor and a LED shown powered through your circuit with, say 5VDC. Then remove your 5V supply and connect the same inputs directly to the mains. Then remove the mains and connect directly to your 40kV source.

A few questions:

1. What is the output impedance of your 40kV source?

2. How have you measured / determined the 'switching' time of your circuit. Is your circuit a low pass filter?

From my experience you might as well show the schematic of your circuit because as soon as you sell one it could be copied with minor changes and there won't be anything you can do about it.

Anyway I guess you have a circuit designed to isolate mains connected equipment from the initial wideband EMP pulse and the following heave, intending to counter the other effects with traditional EMP shielding?

Well done on creating a solution to a problem


[edit on 24/5/2010 by LightFantastic]



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I'm trying to get as many reports as possible. This plus the extra videos, which should be up by the end of the week, will help in a final report.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by LightFantastic
 


Showing different levels of power is initially the main goal of the video. I'll start by connecting the inputs of my system to the mains output that will show how it allows the predefined voltage. But, this input is also connected to a variac that will allow me to increase the voltage. This second test will show my system's ability to respond to over voltages above a certain margin of error.

The third test will have a HV power supply connected to the inputs that will demonstrate how my system attenuates the high voltages throughout the circuit.

The fourth test will be a major one at an EMP facility. This will demonstrate how my system responds to the E1 pulse of an EMP. They would provide a final report that I might post here.

For the supply impedance I used 14AWG HV wire that has a resistance of 2.525 ohms per 1000ft. I used 4ft of wire total so that would amount to only .0101 ohms for the wiring.

The power supply has a resistance of 45.45 or 46 ohms, so the total for the output is only 46 ohms. Of course this will vary with different applications.

Once this hits the homes it's inevitable that schematics will flood the Internet. But even still, I have to hold my data until then.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by macb6497
reply to post by LightFantastic
 

To combat this, if the components needing protection are already in faraday cage, my systems will also have its own cage. Now you’re probably thinking that this will need a ground, in reality, it doesn’t. When the electromagnetic waves interact with the electrons of the atoms in the cage, this will also create a short DC voltage, just the same as the EMP.


Despite what is commonly believed, a Faraday cage has a limit to the field gradient it can expel.

Also I have noticed that you think there will be good coupling efficency between E1 and the power lines. This is not the case whereas the heave portion of the EMP will.

For E1 to have a significant effect on the local power lines, you would have more to worry about than the EMP itself.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by LightFantastic
 


Yes, that is true. Faraday Cages of certain constructions such as how it was pressed and welded, the thickness is most important because of the skin effect, and the frequency range it can conduct do play a big role.

But, the higher the range of frequencies the cage can withstand, the better a chance it has at blocking other EMPs and its different stages. Just like lead, which cannot only block gamma, but because it can stop those high-energy particles it can also stop the lower powered beta and alpha particles.

If a cage is built to withstand an EMP burst in the GHz range, then it will be able to stand up to any other weaker blast, as long as the thickness is increased.

The H1 part of an EMP, even if the power lines don't conduct it, the cages, if manufactured to conduct high frequency waves, will collect that. The heave portion will still be collected by my system and attenuated. If it was the reverse, the heave portion hits the cage and the E1 goes through my system, both parts of the EMP are still collected whichever way it goes.

Either all the stages can go through the cages, through my system, or one stage can go through my system and the other through the cage. In all scenarios, the pulse will be attenuated.

[edit on 24-5-2010 by macb6497]



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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Sounds to me like you're describing something that works on the power line.

A real EMP produced by a nuclear weapon would induce currents in every millimeter of conducting material of your computer, watch, phone, and television.

Does your device protect against that?

I though the only thing that could would be enclosing it completely in a faraday cage.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by 30_seconds
 


This works on "A" line not just the power line itself. If it only worked on the power line then everything ahead of my system would still be affected because it is not protected.

My system is able to protect electronics from every aspect of an EMP because it is not limited to frequency, power, or rise-time.

My system will be enclosed in a very dense faraday cage that will protect the system itself. The components needing protection will also be in a faraday cage and my system will protect the components from transients on the input and output lines.

Enclosing something in a Faraday Cage would protect the components, but only from certain conditions. The cage would have to be very dense in order to protect from even the highest in energy, EMPs. The cage would also have to be thick in order to protect from lower frequency, lower energy blasts due to the skin effect.

With a faraday cage, though, you wouldn't be able to run any big lines into the cage unless you are only expecting low-level electromagnetic radiation.

An EMP can produce, from our current technology, up to 200kV at up to 3kA per squared meter. No system to date can protect from that amount of power and at the speed necessary to protect your dense electronics from an EMP.

[edit on 24-5-2010 by macb6497]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


New Video on EMP and Solar Flare protection is up:


EMP and Solar Flare protection. Breakthrough in circuit-breaker technology

[edit on 26-6-2010 by macb6497]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 08:10 PM
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posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 04:11 AM
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I would like to ask what may be a stupid question.

How do you protect the line between the faraday cages?



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by mrwiffler
 


The EMP and Solar Flare attenuation system will be in its own faraday cage and will be attached to another faraday cage that will hold the components needing protection.

There cannot be any gaps between my system and the faraday cage of the components needing protection.

To save from the cost of production, the components could be installed in the faraday cage with my system. This will allow for a more promising containment and cost reduction.

If you’re talking about heat production in the lines out in open space, if they aren’t rated for the heat gain then they can be damaged. The systems needing protection and my system will still function but the lines bringing in power before them could be damaged by the heat increase.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by macb6497]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by macb6497
The EMP and Solar Flare attenuation system will be in its own faraday cage and will be attached to another faraday cage that will hold the components needing protection.

There cannot be any gaps between my system and the faraday cage of the components needing protection.
That makes sense.Putting the faraday cages next to each other might work but you do need a place for the conductors to go from one faraday cage to the other, like some kind of shielded bridge.

I watched the videos, and I followed what you said.

You have a step-up transformer and fry the LEDS with maybe 7000 volts, that part of the demo was clear.

Then you hook up your device and the LEDs don't fry at the 7000 volts input. But I'm not sure if anything in your video distnguishes the performance characteristics of your device as any different than another transformer, but a step-down instead of step-up like the one shown outside the box.

I'm not saying what's inside your box IS a step-down transformer, only that the demonstration doesn't seem to demonstrate any characteristics other than that.

The way you could demonstrate some unique characteristics is by comparing input and output voltages of your "black box" which is actually a white box, or a box covered in white paper.

So what I would have expected to see in the demo that I really didn't see is the following:

1. Circuit first operating in "normal" mode. This would demonstrate normal input and output voltages, before the EMP.

2. Circuit reacting in EMP mode...as you said you need capacitors to demo an EMP but you did demonstrate an overvoltage test. However without including #1 in your demo, the performance characteristics of the device aren't fully shown.

Another suggestion is you may want to calibrate your variac. You can note the dial position at 200, 400, and 600V and see how linear the dial settings are relative to the voltages, should be pretty linear. If it is, then you can use that info to make a little table to show a pretty good estimate of just how much voltage you are applying at each variac dial setting. Your estimates sound reasonably close but I think you can pin down some closer estimates. Anyway, thanks for making the video, I enjoyed watching it.

By the way I liked the way you tapped the alligator clip before grabbing it, that's pretty smart and something I'd do myself. Even when you think the circuit is off, it doesn't hurt to check it, and that's doubly true when you start working with capacitors because they can really hold a charge after you turn off the power!

Good luck!



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Yeah, the thought that my system is a step-down transformer is really something that I'll have to work hard at to prove that it isn't.

A step down transformer is exponential in its output in relation to the input.

I'll do another video with the voltmeter on the output to prove that I'm not using a step-down transformer.

Thanks for the tip!

Marc



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by macb6497
 



The new video about proving that I'm not using a step-down transformer is up.

It called "EMP and Solar Flare Protection - Answering Your Questions"

Check it out

[edit on 27-6-2010 by macb6497]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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Originally posted by macb6497
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 
A step down transformer is exponential in its output in relation to the input.

Where did you get that idea? As far as know a transformer is linear. As you said yourself, the black transformer in your video steps up the voltage 100 times. That is a linear function. A step down transformer would do the same thing in reverse, so if it had a factor of 100 like the step-up transformer you're using it would just bring the voltage back to the original level before it was stepped up by your black 100x transformer.

I watched the new video where you took out the transformer but it really didn't address my concern.

Here is an example of a varistor graph showing a clamping voltage at work:

www.epcos.com...=Data__en.pdf;/SIOV_Gen eral.pdf


Look at the way that the voltage is NOT affected at all by the device from about -500V to +500V. But starting at about 600V, the device kicks in and starts protecting the circuitry. This happens because the Varistor is taking the excess current and not allowing the voltage to increase linearly, thereby protecting the equipment from overvoltage.

Here are the performance characteristics I would look for in an overvoltage protection device which you really haven't demonstrated:

1. 120 volts in and 120 volts out. This means we expect the device to deliver exactly the input voltage when there's no overvoltage present, or very close to it.
If you leave your black transformer hooked up this would be a setting of 1.2 on your variac if it were calibrated but since it's 1 tick off as you said, this setting would actually be less than zero on your variac. But measuring the voltage at the input of your "white box" and the output should show the same voltage. It doesn't have to be 120V and 120V, it could be 100V and 100V or 150V and 150V, just reasonably close to say household voltage of 120V, or 240V.

Then as the input voltage increases, what the output needs to show is a NON-LINEAR increase. In surge protector parlance they refer to a clamping voltage.

2. Put 500V in, how much voltage out?
3. Put 1000V in, I expect to see less than 1000 V out
4. Put 3000V in, I expect to see less than 1000 V out
5. put 6000V in, I expect to see less than 1000 V out

I dont expect to see an entire graph like this from you but at least 3 or 4 or 5 different input versus output voltage measurements to show how your device allows normal voltages and currents through and keeps abnormal voltages and currents out, as shown in the graph I posted. I really haven't seen that in the videos so far.

Does this make sense?

[edit on 27-6-2010 by Arbitrageur]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by macb6497
 


Perhaps you could take your device to a workshop where impulse testing of transformers is undertaken. Impulse testing is supposed to simulate a lightning strike so that would certainly be a good start and probably not too expensive. That would only demonstrate the device's ability to interrupt line voltage spikes, not currents induced directly from the E.M.P. though but I think footage and test results would be very valuable to your cause.

Also did you say yor device was rated at 25.2 MJ? How does it dissipate this power? That's nearly a kg of diesel! Also you rated the output of a power station in MW hrs. Huh? You said your device was protected by a Faraday Cage. I'm thinking the limiting factor of a Faraday Cage would be the resistance of the material it's made of. An E.M.P. of large enough magnitude could induce a current (due to voltage drop across the construction material) through the cage itself big enough to overload the components in your device.

Can you please give me a basic overview of how your device works? I would just like to know the principles not intimate details.

[edit on 28-6-2010 by OZtracized]

[edit on 28-6-2010 by OZtracized]

[edit on 28-6-2010 by OZtracized]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Would a transformer have an exponential output if the turns ratio was 10:1 (or 1:10) or a multiple of? Is this device a glorified surge protector (to put it in layman terms) with a higher kA and kV rating? I ask you because you seem to understand this subject and could give me a view less biased than the O.P.. I mean no disrespect O.P. by the way!



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by OZtracized
 


I rated a future system in MJ because of the power dissipated during an EMP. MJ can be converted into watts.

I rated it is MJ hrs to show how it would stand up to the continuous power drawn by current transformers at power stations.

I wasn't rating the current device I have shown in the videos. That device was a proof of concept for the bigger one I'll build.

About the faraday cage, I stated earlier that I would create a connection from the cage to the input of my system so that it could be attenuated.

The reason I haven't provided details directly relating to the system is because I don't have an approved patent yet. Once that is in order I won't mind sharing the descriptions.


Sorry about how I said the output of a step-down transformer was exponential. I said that because I was thinking about a sine wave and how it would change due to the change in input voltage.

Hope some of that helps.



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