Egyptian Surgery? Wow!

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posted on May, 23 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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Great post!

Star and flag for you.

Those ancient Egyptians were pretty swell in my book.

Relatively advanced medicine AND crazy secks orgies. Plus, ancient Egyptian women shaved themselves you-know-where, or so I've heard.




posted on May, 23 2010 @ 03:20 PM
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One question still remains.
Should we consider them as advanced or ourselves as primitive?



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by SugarCube
reply to post by Byrd
 


Dried camel dung would do the trick, you can't argue that ;-)



That answer really made my day.
More of that, please ...



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
Very nice thread.


I once saw a documentary where they laid down ancient Egyption and modern surgical tools next to each other. They were amazingly the same.

I wonder what they used as anesthetic and to prevent infection.
As far as I know there are lots of human remains found that showed they were once subjected to surgery and lived to tell the tale.

S & F


Were poppy seeds in the area during that time , or available for trade? I'm sure they could have made a weaker morphine like medicine with it to help take away some pain....


This is a great read though. If you told the average American that this is fact they would call you crazy.........

That is how dumb we really are. We need to re-think exactly how advanced we think we really are...



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by merka

Originally posted by Kandinsky
I wonder what they used as anesthetic and to prevent infection.

Or they didnt use it at all...
Most historical records dont tell the story whether many survived or not.

Anyway, its quite interesting... Though not all that surprising. The Romans had equally advanced surgery (including eye surgery!). It wasnt until the dark ages that medicine became so taboo and "mystical".


Yea the dark ages seems like a huge push to gain a crap load of control and take over the world by a few families, and to dumb down the population as so to retain power for ....well forever.........

they failed because we broke out of it.......but maybe they only needed us dumbed down for so long as to keep us from advancing faster than " the kings people "......talking about the masses mainly..


There is something more to the Dark ages than we are told.........

It was hard in the early days to take over the world with other nations to battle and for it to take generations to achieve also made it difficult.......

But as many of them collapsed, few European nations could gain more power and in turn more control and with them collecting and hoarding all money ( gold , jewels, precious metals ) they could keep us from advancing and keep the weak minded and greedy in their pockets....

And if you disagreed then you were killed......


The closest I can think to this is what is happening now.....just on a different scale..

AS we progress through the ages the same type of events occur, but at/on different scales....


So we obviously are not in dark ages, but insted of it taking 2,000 years for a Power to rise, maintain, and then fall, it now only takes 200-300 years........

Might have to do with natural cycles....but there is something to it...just not 100% sure yet..



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 
The 'Dark Ages' is a European concept coined by 18th-19th Century historians. South American culture was at a high and the Middle East was in a 'renaissance' period. China and India were in resurgence.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:23 PM
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Well Egypt was the birth of Medicine really. Giving the first known logical theory of illness of 'blocked channels' and also giving birth to the tools that you've shown.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 
The 'Dark Ages' is a European concept coined by 18th-19th Century historians. South American culture was at a high and the Middle East was in a 'renaissance' period. China and India were in resurgence.





I agree, think of the Mesoamerican cities at this time, think of the birth of Science and Algebra in the Middeast, and you'll soon agree that "Dark Ages" could only have referred to Western Europe at the time it refers to (anywhere from the 9th -15th Centuries depending on who you beleive).

"Dark Ages" is not really PC but I still use it, it just means (to me) a period where we stagnated compared to earlier examples of history. By WE I mean Western Europe. Of course there were discoveries, revelations and great advances, but to me it seems they were almost "rediscoveries" of long lost information. Knowledge that the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Sumerian civilisations and residents of the Indus Valley (to name a handfull) already had!

All the best, kiwi





[edit on 23-5-2010 by kiwifoot]



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by QuetzalcoatlAlien
 


And this is precisely why I LOVE the ancient astronaut theories.
Because our ancestors WERE so good.

Unless we were to believe they were great at all things... architecture, engineering, medicine, etc... except for recording their own history.
You see it is THEY who say that the sky beings helped them.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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Pretty amazing that much of the advice given is still used today, although alot of it was no doubt just common sense approaches from trial and error, hence not much has changed since then. Still absolute no chance i would let an egyptian from back then treat me.



[edit on 23-5-2010 by Solomons]



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by Xtrozero

Originally posted by merka

Most historical records dont tell the story whether many survived or not.


Though mortality rate was high they have found a good number of bones with surgery done and healed, so this shows the person lived.


Very true -- there are a number of bodies and mummies with old injuries. It's only during times of government collapse and when old Akhenatum decided to build his royal city in the middle of nowhere do we find lots of deaths at an early age that seem to involve a number of injuries.

Mortality rate was probably similar to that of the "developing countries" in today's world.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 07:25 PM
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Do you suppose that they might have used the raw meat to actually attract the flies? The flies would lay their eggs and those would develop into maggots which would eat the dead flesh. I believe maggots are used in the treatment of diabetic ulcers. Just a thought.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


while you give opium to sedate and numb the patient, digitalis would often be used (or possibly nightshade) as a way to lower the heart beat and further sedate the patient.

the men who would perform these acts were no doubt well versed in The Mysteries, alchemy, and herbalism. To a technical and superb degree.

I have also heard of Amerinds using honey as a birth control. And its ability to remain sterile and never spoil is very attractive when looking at creating a wound barrier.

That is why TAO is in petroleum jelly...it is a barrier to moisture and bacteria, just like mucous.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 08:22 PM
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Another site for more study

Brain surgery is perhaps the oldest of the practiced medical arts. No hard evidence exists suggesting a beginning to the practice of other facets of medicine such as pharmacology -- using drugs, chemical and natural ingredients to help a fellow human being. There is ample evidence, however, of brain surgery, dating back to the Neolithic (late Stone Age) period.
Unearthed remains of successful brain operations, as well as surgical implements, were found in France-- at one of Europe's noted archeological digs.

And, the success rate was remarkable, even circa 7,000 B.C.

But, pre-historic evidence of brain surgery was not limited to Europe. Pre-Incan civilization used brain surgery as an extensive practice as early as 2,000 B.C. In Paracas, Peru, a desert strip south of Lima, archeologic evidence indicates that brain surgery was used extensively. Here, too, an inordinate success rate was noted as patients were restored to health. The treatment was used for mental illnesses, epilepsy, headaches, organic diseases, osteomylitis, as well as head injuries.

Brain surgery was also used for both spiritual and magical reasons; often, the practice was limited to kings, priests and the nobility.

Surgical tools in South America were made of both bronze and man-shaped obsidian (a hard, sharp-edged volcanic rock).

Africa showed evidence of brain surgery as early as 3,000 B.C. in papyrus writings found in Egypt. "Brain," the actual word itself, is used here for the first time in any language. Egyptian knowledge of anatomy may have been rudimentary, but the ancient civilization did contribute important notations on the nervous system.

Hippocrates, the father of modern medical ethics, left many texts on brain surgery. Born on the Aegean Island of Cos in 470 B.C., Hippocrates was quite familiar with the clinical signs of head injuries. He also described seizures accurately, as well as spasms and classified head contusions, fractures and depressions. Many concepts found in his texts were still in good stead two thousand years after his death in 360 B.C.

Ancient Rome in the first century A.D. had its brain surgeon star, Aulus Cornelius Celsus. Hippocrates did not operate on depressed skull fractures; Celsus often did. Celsus also described the symptoms of brain injury in great detail.

history of brain surgery



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by wiseone11
 


For those who find any value in Lobsang Rampa, there are stories he told of brain operations that took place for the purpose of mystical capabilities.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
Very nice thread.


I once saw a documentary where they laid down ancient Egyption and modern surgical tools next to each other. They were amazingly the same.

I wonder what they used as anesthetic and to prevent infection.
As far as I know there are lots of human remains found that showed they were once subjected to surgery and lived to tell the tale.

S & F


Many common plants can be used to make teas or oils which have powerful antibiotic properties. You can be sure more was known of such herbs back then than our pharmaceutical-addicted society has information about.

Manuka and Jellybush honeys are great too, but any pure non-boiled honey makes an effective antibiotic when spread on a wound.

For anaesthetics, they are bound to have developed derivatives of opium and other drugs.

Putting meat on a wound seems weird, but when I was a kid a raw steak, (applied externally,) was standard treatment for a black eye. Perhaps it does something useful.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by Dumbass
One question still remains.
Should we consider them as advanced or ourselves as primitive?


One more question still remains.
Should we consider ourselves to be advanced or primitive?



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 




From my understanding, raw meat works due to immune response. There are still dendrites, etc, in the meat. Fresher meat is better.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 12:53 AM
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Terrific thread Kdinks!
S and F

Just by seeing their ability to perform post mortem preservation shows they had great interest in the human body and how it worked.

They knew which organs were vital for life, hence would preserve them in Canopic jars to be "useable" in the after life.

Their chemicals from nature to preserve the organs especially skin were also employed, and they did not simply rely on "drying out" the corpse, though that did take place.

Spose my point is, to have such knowledge meant that biological experiments on the human form were common practice and meant they were pretty clued up on the human body.....that said.....pity Tutankahmen died of a broken leg ......





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