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Muslim response to Draw Muhammad Day, Tit-for-Tat

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posted on May, 26 2010 @ 06:38 AM
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Originally posted by miasria
reply to post by Tiger5
 


i would hope that those who've been offended would resort to offending others. it's a vicious cycle. easy to start.. hard to stop once it takes on it's own life.



clarification... i mean to say that i hope that those who have been offended would "not" resort to offending others.




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Facebook has lost face


www.huffingtonpost.com...


Facebook Censors 'Everybody Draw Mohammad Day' Page, Pakistan Lifts Ban


The move came almost two weeks after Pakistan imposed the ban amid anger over a page that encouraged users to post images of Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Many Muslims regard depictions of the prophet, even favorable ones, as blasphemous.

"In response to our protest, Facebook has tendered their apology and informed us that all the sacrilegious material has been removed from the URL," said Najibullah Malik, secretary of Pakistan's information technology ministry, referring to the technical term for a Web page.

Facebook assured the Pakistani government that "nothing of this sort will happen in the future," Malik said.

Officials from the website could not immediately be reached for comment. They said earlier the contents of the "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day!" page did not violate Facebook's terms.

The page encouraged users to post images of the prophet to protest threats made by a radical Muslim group against the creators of the American TV series "South Park" for depicting Muhammad in a bear suit during an episode earlier this year.

Pakistan blocked Facebook on May 19 following a ruling by one of the country's highest courts. The Lahore High Court reversed its ruling Monday because of Facebook's response, paving the way for the government to restore access, Malik said.

The government will continue to block some Web pages that contain "sacrilegious material," but Malik declined to specify which ones.

The Facebook controversy sparked a handful of protests across Pakistan, many by student members of radical Islamic groups. Some of the protesters carried signs advocating holy war against the website for allowing the page.



 
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