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Omega-3: Fishy claims for fish oil

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posted on May, 20 2010 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by Violater1

Originally posted by LadySkadi
reply to post by plumranch
 


I think the use of oils directly, are likely much better quality and of much better health benefit over all.


Source or research article please.
I'm not doubting you, I just want the best nutrition for me and my family.


Sorry. It was something I read some time ago. As I recall, it talked about poor quality in capsules. It also talked about the amount needed to take (multiple capsules) to equal the equivalent of 1 tsp of the oil. I would think you can find the information in nutrition books or online research. For all I know, it could have been an opinion piece. I just don't remember.



[edit on 20-5-2010 by LadySkadi]




posted on May, 20 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


If you want the healthiest source then you should not go with the capsule form.

Most are made out of Animal products, usually from a cow or pig.

If you want the most natural thing go with a "kosher" capsule brand that is made out of potato starch.

[edit on 20-5-2010 by TV_Nation]



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 





Sorry. It was something I read some time ago. As I recall, it talked about poor quality in capsules. It also talked about the amount needed to take (multiple capsules) to equal the equivalent of 1 tsp of the oil. I would think you can find the information in nutrition books or online research.


5- 1gm capsules = 5cc= 1 tsp so 6 caps is a little over a teaspoon.

Quality is easy to evaluate. If it's USP its phamaceutical human grade. Fresh caps are a light straw color. After 2-3 year or so they darken and smell very rancid fishy so it is easy to determine freshness by either smell or appearance. Or, read the expiration date that is required on the USP product. The bottle in front of me here expires OCT 2012.

Afraid of the preservative? Don't be because almost all are preserved with tocopherol. That's a form of vit E that is a handy, cheap antioxidant, preservative for food and cosmetics. Your body needs vit E anyway for a number of reasons.

If it doesn't have any preservative, it is dangerous. Rancid, unpreserved fat is toxic, carcinogenic, contributes to aging and all sorts of problems:


Rancid fat is the other bad fat -- fat that has been mutated by oxygen, heat, moisture, and light. This fat is full of free radicals and can contribute to all the health and aging problems associated with them.
Rancid Fat Facts



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 10:42 PM
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There are some other considerations for fish oil.

For one thing, there is the theoritical risk of heavy metal accumulations in fish oil concentrates.

Many people, regardless of the form of the fish oil, dislike the aftertaste many people notice.

There are other reasons as well, but for many of my patients, I recommend that they take flax oil. No aftertaste. No likely source of heavy metal contamination. Also, it is likewise high in the Omega-3s, but also several other Omega complexes.



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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Understanding the differences -

flax seed oil vs fish oil It's the ages-old debate of flax seed oil vs fish oil.

Which one is better, which one should you take? The questions abound. I'm going to breakdown the differences between flax seed oil vs fish oil so you know which does exactly what and which one is best for you.

Flax Seed Oil vs Fish Oil Are the Omega 3 oils in flax seed oil the same as the Omega 3 oils found in fish oil? The answer is a resounding no.

While the Omega-3 fats in flax seed oil and fish oil are related, they do have a different chemical makeup. The Omega 3 Fatty Acids There are three main types of fatty acids.

EPA, DHA and ALA. Flax seed oil vs fish oil is as simple as EPA and DHA vs ALA.

The Omega 3 fatty acids in fish oil are the EPA and DHA fatty acids and the Omega 3 fatty acids in flax seed oil are the ALA fatty acids.

It is harder for your body to get the Omega 3 out of the ALA fatty acids and that's why it's so important that any Omega 3 supplement you take be derived from fish oil like the supplement available at this website.

Do I Need Both? There is no harm in taking both flax seed oil and fish oil, if you're taking the supplements to get the benefits touted for Omega 3 then you probably would be well off just taking fish oil supplements.

When taking fish oil supplements, make sure that the supplements you are taking are pharmaceutical grade fish oil. This will ensure that you're getting quality fish oil supplements without getting any nasty toxins left in the fish. In the battle of flax seed oil vs fish oil, both have their benefits, but fish oil definitely wins the battle.

www.aboutomega3.com...
I was taking both flax and Fish oil for some time and just decided to stick with fish oil. I would say it's better to take at least on of the two than none at all.

[edit on 20-5-2010 by TV_Nation]



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 11:00 PM
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There was a clinical study about three years ago or so, and it was of somewhat limited credibility because of the relatively small sample number, only about 200 people, as I recall, but a six month survey did demonstrate a small improvement of the HDL to LDL ration. It did look considerably better in control of triglycerides, with a statistically significant impact. Also, there was a study last year on flax oil and fish oil that both decreased the Cardio C-Reactive Protein in a population with known coronary artery disease.

My point is that either will have better benefits than doing nothing.



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by Truth1000
 





I recommend that they take flax oil. No aftertaste. No likely source of heavy metal contamination. Also, it is likewise high in the Omega-3s, but also several other Omega complexes.


I thought so too till I did some research. My source mentioned it but here is a good study:

Conversion Efficiency of ALA to DHA in Humans


In summary, the conversion efficiency from ALA to DHA is very limited in healthy individuals; furthermore, the apparent inefficiency of the conversion from ALA to DHA is markedly variable between individuals within different sectors of the populations such that the lack of sufficient dietary DHA could compromise optimal health in those with very minimal conversion capacities. The very low conversion efficiencies and wide variation in capacities lend support to serious consideration being given to dietary DHA as an 'essential' fatty acid and/or a 'conditionally essential' fatty acid depending upon the conversion capacity of individuals within the population.


Bottom line, Flax seed oil does not convert well to the good fatty acids EPA and DHA in humans. USP Fish oil is pure and if you don't like the taste, use the peppermint flavored products.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 01:56 AM
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I found a study relevant to this thread. However, I didn't see anything of much interest in it.

There is a handy table to shows the fatty acid makeup of Sunflower/Flax/Hemp/Fish

Table 1. Omega 3 & 6 Fatty Acids in 1 gram capsule
(All values in mg)

....................---Omega 3----....-Omega 6-.....Sums.....
...................DHA...EPA...ALA....LA....GLA....O-6...O-3.....Ratio of O6:O3
Sunflower oil. 0 ..... 0 ... 15 .... 680 ... 7 .... 687 .. 15 ..... 46:1
Fish oil ......... 121 . 176 . 6 ..... 13 .... 2 .... 15 .... 303 .... 0.05:1
Flaxseed oil .. 0 ..... 0 .... 511 .. 140 .. 9 .... 149 .. 511 .... 0.3:1
Hempseed oil 0 ...... 0 ....186 ... 572 . 26 ....598...186 ......3:1


A Comparison of Fish Oil, Flaxseed Oil and Hempseed Oil Supplementation on Selected Parameters of Cardiovascular Health in Healthy Volunteers

Although Fish oil has DHA & EPA which have a higher bioavailability (did I use that term correctly?) than ALA, hemp seed offers the optimum ratio of omega 6 to 3 at 3:1 respectively.

There are 49 references listed at the end of the study if anyone wants to investigate more research, but I'm not interested enough to dig anymore.

Sorry about the ugly table, the alignment was fubar when I used spaces instead of periods

[edit on 21-5-2010 by JohnnyTHSeed]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 02:11 AM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


I think the bit about how the japanese eat so much fish makes them less depressed is a stretch. Learn a bit about japanese culture in general...

Unless you think the fish is the reason for their entire culture!

Maybe if we all ate more fish, we could play musical instruments at the speed of thought like the japanese.

Regardless, I think a lot of what we are capable of has to do with what we believe.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 02:24 AM
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reply to post by TarzanBeta
 





I think the bit about how the japanese eat so much fish makes them less depressed is a stretch. Learn a bit about japanese culture in general...


I kind of agree with that since my daughter spent a year there and educated me about the Japanese nutrition and culture.

But they have a very good and balanced nutrition!

The culture may play a part with depression. That is the problem with comparing the Germans to the Japanese. Different cultures and approach.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyTHSeed
 





Although Fish oil has DHA & EPA which have a higher bioavailability (did I use that term correctly?) than ALA, hemp seed offers the optimum ratio of omega 6 to 3 at 3:1 respectively.


If you have been following the thread, it is not the ratio of 3, 6 , and 9 FAs that is important it is the EPA and DHA content that is important.

So with hemp oil we have:




Hempseed oil 0 ...... 0 ....186 ... 572 . 26 ....598...186 ......3:1


The first 2 zeros are EPA and DHA the very important FAs, the ALA of 186 is impressive but not important because in humans (and other higher mammals) the ALA is not converted adequately to the EPA and DHA. The conversions does not happen as previously mentioned.

So hemp, flax seed oil, honey suckle and all the other inland, agricultural sources of the important omega 3s, don't provide the all important EPA and DHA.



[edit on 21/5/10 by plumranch]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


Thank you for bringing this to my attention. My DHA deficient brain missed that


I will definitely start supplementing DHA & maybe EPA. I'm going to do some math to see how likely it is that I am synthesizing enough EPA, but I'll probably supplement just to be sure. I *think* I remember seeing soy milk that is fortified with DHA...

Again, thank you for the heads up, you may have saved me from Parkinson's


DHA Deficiency Linked to Parkinson's



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 04:20 AM
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I am using Cod liver oil myself and have done some research on it. I just want to stress that you are very careful in picking the right brand. Some fish oils contain a high level of heavy metals.

This is the response from one producer to a publication about toxics in fish oils:


You may have heard news reports about fish oil supplements containing the environmental chemical pollutants PCBs. Many news reports aired on TV and in the newspapers mentioning NOW Foods salmon oil and cod liver oil. This is the result of a lawsuit filed by the Mateel Environmental Justice Foundation and two individuals against NOW and 7 other defendants. They claim that we are in violation of a law in the state of California (Proposition 65) that requires manufacturers to provide a warning label on products containing substances that could cause cancer and / or reproductive harm. A product could be completely safe, comply with all federal requirements, and still be subject to Proposition 65 litigation. Proposition 65 is a unique law that requires warning labels to be provided on products sold in California even though the chemical substances involved may be far below levels considered to be safe by national and international regulations.

This lawsuit claims that three of our fish oil products (Shark Liver Oil, Salmon Oil, and Double Strength Cod Liver Oil) exceed the limits that require a warning label under California’s Proposition 65 law. The plaintiffs in the lawsuit claim that our products tested for the presence of PCBs in very small amounts. PCBs are an environmental pollutant that are found virtually everywhere in nature. The levels of PCBs that were reported in the lawsuit were far less than the limits that are allowed for a serving of fish.

You can be assured that OUR PRODUCTS MEET ALL FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS.

Many nutrition experts have stated that the considerable health benefits of taking fish oils outweigh the risk of trace amounts of chemical pollutants found in fish. It is important to note that all of our fish oil products are manufactured using processes that reduce potential contaminants that are common to fish including PCBs, heavy metals, mercury, and dioxins. Advanced instrumentation, including HPLC, FTIR, ICP-MS and GC are used to measure potency and the presence of contamination. Two of our fish oil supplements are even listed as a “ Best Choice “ by the Environmental Defense Fund for purity!

For over 40 years NOW Foods has been committed to our mission of providing value in products that empower people to lead healthier lives. We continue to stand behind that commitment.

source


Don't only take price into consideration, because a bad quality oil might do more harm than good to your health.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 04:59 AM
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reply to post by Mdv2
 


Pollutants in fish is one reason I am looking at getting DHA that is derived from a farmed algae source - supposedly the same species algae that the fish get DHA from.

I have read that the algae does NOT have EPA in it.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by TV_Nation
 



Flaxseed Oil – Advantages and Disadvantages



There are many verified benefits of flaxseed oil and it is effective in providing nutritional support to people on diets. It has Omega-3 fatty acids which are considered to be a healthy fat and fiber to aid in digestion and suppress the appetite. There is limited evidence to show that it helps reduce weight gain in obese people but more research is necessary in this area. Studies have been done to determine the beneficial effects of flaxseed oil to prevent diabetic conditions but further research is necessary for confirmation of these benefits.

Flaxseed oil is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, potassium, and magnesium, Vitamin B, fiber, and protein and trace amounts of alpha-linoic acid. It is common in many health foods and can be purchased in the natural form or in liquid or capsule form in most health food stores. It is on the expensive side as far as supplements go. There is also a laxative effect that you will want to research before you try it.

Fish Oil – Advantages and Disadvantages



Fish Oil is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids which are effective in benefiting people who suffer from high blood pressure and heart disease. Some studies have shown that the fatty acids contained in fish oil are also effective against depression, degenerative brain disease and in prevention of macular degeneration. It is believed by experts that fish oil can help to maintain normal levels of cholesterol. The EPA and DHA fatty acids that are found in fish oil have anti-inflammatory benefits that treat arthritis and helps to prevent arterial plaques from forming preventing arteriosclerosis. If you are taking medication for high blood pressure or heart condition you need to speak to your doctor before adding fish oil supplements to your diet, it can be contraindicated with some medications.

Among the advantages of fish oil there are also some disadvantages. Some fish oil products contain toxic substances in trace amounts because the source of the fish was from polluted waters. Some products are not processed in sterile conditions and instead of gaining health benefits you can actually be introducing pollutants and toxins into your body.

Flaxseed Oil vs. Fish Oil – You Decide



Both of these oils are healthy for you. When making the choice of flaxseed oil vs. fish oil the difference mainly lies in the type of Omega-3 fatty acids they contain. Flaxseed oil contains Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA) and Fish oil contains Docosahexanoic Acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA). If you are pure vegetarian then flaxseed oil would be your choice.


Source: Methods of Healing: Flaxseed Oil vs. Fish Oil, April 3rd, 2010

I thought the notes about the medication interaction, possible pollutants, fiber, and vegetarian choice are of interest to add this here.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyTHSeed
reply to post by Mdv2
 


Pollutants in fish is one reason I am looking at getting DHA that is derived from a farmed algae source - supposedly the same species algae that the fish get DHA from.

I have read that the algae does NOT have EPA in it.



Is flaxseed oil a good source of DHA?



Flaxseed oil is a dietary source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor of DHA. The body can make small amounts of DHA from ALA, but this process is inefficient and variable. Therefore, if you are looking for the benefits of DHA, it is best to consume it directly.


Source: DHA FAQ


I wouldn't be surprised that in vegetarian that their natural metabolism will covert ALA to DHA at a higher rate than those that directly take DHA products. This logic follows the same basis of how people get addicted physically to drugs where the body seems to find another source of something it needs. People may be physically addicted to take DHA directly until they can resolve that addiction with ALA.

[edit on 21-5-2010 by dzonatas]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by plumranch
Some people don't live near a salmon stream or an ocean!


I don't live near a salmon stream but I can buy salmon at the fish market and I prefer to get my nutrients from natural foods, like eating salmon, as opposed to taking supplements. The only supplement I take is a simple one-a day, as kind of an insurance policy, but I try to get enough nutrients from the food I eat. And I'm very healthy so something is working right with this strategy, I don't have this joint pain people are talking about, even though a doctor once told me to expect joint pain based on his examination of me... it never happened.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 





I don't live near a salmon stream but I can buy salmon at the fish market and I prefer to get my nutrients from natural foods, like eating salmon, as opposed to taking supplements.


Many Alaskans do as you do!

Does it Matter What Kind of Fish I Eat?


Fatty fish, such as salmon, herring, and to a lesser extent tuna, contain the most omega-3 fatty acids and therefore the most benefit, but many types of seafood contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. Most freshwater fish have less omega-3 fatty acids than do fatty fish from the sea. Some varieties of trout have relatively high levels of omega-3 fatty acids.


What about catfish and other bottom feeders?


Are there any kinds of fish you should avoid? Some fish, such as tilapia and catfish, have low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and high levels of arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid that's also found in red meat and egg yolks. Eating too much arachidonic acid can increase your risk of heart disease because it can cause inflammation, which can contribute to the buildup of plaques in your arteries. This can cause coronary artery disease, a heart attack or stroke.


Not that omega-6 or arachidonic acid is that bad for you but it's not as good as say EPA!



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


Actually salmon and catfish are two of my favorite foods, so thanks for the catfish info, I didn't know that!

In addition to the natural sources of nutrients being more nutritious than supplements, I have to say I just love the taste of salmon (catfish too).

I've actually cur back a little bit on fish though, all the toxins that are accumulated concern me a little, like mercury, etc.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Consumers Guide to Murcury in Fish


LEAST MERCURY Enjoy these fish: Anchovies Butterfish Catfish Clam Crab (Domestic) Crawfish/Crayfish Croaker (Atlantic) Flounder* Haddock (Atlantic)* Hake Herring Mackerel (N. Atlantic, Chub) Mullet Oyster Perch (Ocean) Plaice Pollock Salmon (Canned)** Salmon (Fresh)** Sardine Scallop* Shad (American) Shrimp* Sole (Pacific) Squid (Calamari) Tilapia Trout (Freshwater) Whitefish


So you are good eating your Salmon and Catfish!



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