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House Passes Legislation Paying States to Collect Your DNA Upon Arrest!

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posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:18 PM
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House votes to expand national DNA arrest database


Millions of Americans arrested for but not convicted of crimes will likely have their DNA forcibly extracted and added to a national database, according to a bill that the U.S. House of Representatives approved on Tuesday.

By a 357 to 32 vote, the House approved legislation that will pay state governments to require DNA samples, which could mean drawing blood with a needle, from adults "arrested for" certain serious crimes. Not one Democrat voted against the database measure, which would hand out about $75 million to states that agree to make such testing mandatory.

(emphasis mine)

Amazing isn't it ... barely anyone voted against this!

So the Feds pay the States to collect the DNA of people who are simply arrested, for database storage.


Congressman Dave Reichert (WA-08), the former Sheriff of King County, Washington, today applauded House passage of Katie’s Law, (H.R. 4614), a bipartisan bill he cosponsored with colleagues Harry Teague (NM-02) and Adam Schiff (CA-29) that encourages states to implement minimum DNA testing provisions for felony arrestees, and to match that DNA to existing profiles in the national database. wireupdate.com...


Anyone on the ATS haz an issue with this?

ETA: 20 Most Common Fellonies in the US

[edit on 19 May 2010 by schrodingers dog]




posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:30 PM
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posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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and to think that these are the people who we have elected to look out for our best interests.

everyone who voted in favor of this should be hung for treason



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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Here where I live they want a fingerprint data-bank for everyone with central access for govt agencies.

There is a class action law suit running, but I fear the worst.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 09:10 PM
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A list of the 20 most common felonies in the US.

(1) Drug abuse violations 1,841,182
(2) Driving while Intoxicated 1,427,494 (aka Felony DUI)
(3) Property crime 1,610,088 (includes burglary, larceny, theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.)
(4) Larceny-theft 1,172,762
(5) Assault 1,305,693
(6) Disorderly conduct 709,105
(7) Liquor laws 633,654
(8) Violent crime 597,447 (including murder, non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault.
(9) Drunkenness 589,402
(10) Aggravated assault 433,945
(11) Burglary 303,853
(12) Vandalism 291,575
(13) Fraud 252,873
(14) Weapons violations (carrying or possession) 188,891
(15) Curfew and loitering 143,002
(16) Robbery 126,715
(17) Offenses against family and children 122,812
(18) Stolen property (buying, receiving, possession) 122,061
(19) Motor vehicle theft 118,231
(20) Forgery and counterfeiting 103,448

Also, felons lose many of their civil rights. The right to run for government office, join the military, and vote can be taken away. Felons may lose their drivers licenses through suspension or revocation. Prospective employers have the right to inquire about any felony convictions, and can even require insurance coverage in the way of a surety bond provided by the employee. Many insurance companies will not insure convicted felons, making it difficult for convicted felons to find work.

Most Troubling: disorderly conduct, curfew, loitering, drunkenness, weapons violations --- felony???? vague acts, and weapon possession violation (not a liberty?)



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 10:12 PM
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Here's the actual bill that just got passed: www.govtrack.us...

I have to say that I am somewhat torn over this one ... on one hand the scope of crimes covered by this bill seems to be limited to the most egregious. On the other hand DNA testing someone who has simply been arrested and not charged with any crime seems not only fundamentally wrong, but also potentially easily abused by LEO who could simply arrest someone on scant evidence solely for the purpose of checking/cross-referencing their DNA. As I understand it, you can pretty much arrest anyone. This will only be exacerbated if the Feds are giving states financial incentive to do so.

But it will save lives and prevent violent/sexual crimes ...

Ugh.

[edit on 19 May 2010 by schrodingers dog]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 10:16 PM
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Great find, Mr. schrodingers dog and a scary situation to find our country in.

It's a sad day in America when so few politicians bother to vote against such an Orwellian measure, and it's indicative of the direction the country is heading in.

On a related note, I heard that Jehovah's Witnesses are exempt from being forced to provide DNA samples on religious grounds. Can anyone confirm this? If so, I may just convert.


TheAssoc.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


I believe I just came down with an alleged case of HIV.

Achoo. Oh, wanna draw blood, I am allegedly HIV positive!


Oooops, that may not be a good thing to say, you could get charged with attempted murder!

Okay, if it is a good looking female cop.

Miss, I suffer from that old Hawaiian disease, Lak-a-nooky. If I fall into unconsciousness, a good Lei will revive.


[edit on 5/19/2010 by endisnighe]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 10:40 PM
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Well first of all, I hope I never get arrested.

Second, if they want my DNA....they can give me a Dixie cup and I'll take a big fat DUMP in it.

If they want my DNA they'll have to go through my own S to get it!



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 11:49 PM
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"By a 357 to 32 vote, the House approved legislation that will pay state governments to require DNA samples, which could mean drawing blood with a needle, from adults "arrested for" certain serious crimes. Not one Democrat voted against the database measure, which would hand out about $75 million to states that agree to make such testing mandatory."

I don't see anything wrong with this

[edit on 19-5-2010 by xX aFTeRm4Th Xx]



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by xX aFTeRm4Th Xx
 


Well, normally I don't like to invoke the "slippery slope" argument for it is often a fallacious one ... but in this case it is not:


And in New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has sought to go even further, proposing DNA tests for everyone arrested in the city, even for misdemeanors.
www.politico.com...


Are you ok with that?

Are we okay with all of our DNAs stored in databases so that every time a crime is committed, should DNA evidence be relevant, the authorities can cross reference it?

I'm not an LEO but it seems the attempt here, at least down the line, is to make it even easier to collect DNA than fingerprints.



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 05:53 PM
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This being a conspiracy-oriented website , I feel I must insert my two-cents worth .

I was watching Ancient Aliens the other night , and part of it was discussing Noah's Ark.

The guy was trying to show that instead of actually 'collecting' all of the animals , maybe some type of DNA data bank was taken into the ark , as it would seem that collecting all of those animals and housing them on a boat of the given size would not have been possible .

So , from a conspiracy standpoint , maybe the collection of DNA on such a wide scale as is being proposed in the OP , would be a way to weed out the bad vs good DNA when it comes time to re-populate the Earth .

(2012, Georgia Guidestones , all-out nuclear war , etc.)

For what it's worth ...



posted on May, 20 2010 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by xX aFTeRm4Th Xx
"By a 357 to 32 vote, the House approved legislation that will pay state governments to require DNA samples, which could mean drawing blood with a needle, from adults "arrested for" certain serious crimes. Not one Democrat voted against the database measure, which would hand out about $75 million to states that agree to make such testing mandatory."

I don't see anything wrong with this

[edit on 19-5-2010 by xX aFTeRm4Th Xx]


Key words here are "arrested for, charged with", not "convicted" or "found guilty"... which will result in DNA samples being forced from innocent people based on unproven government allegations.

This will also encourage police to "charge" people with these certain "serious crimes" to grab DNA, knowing the charges can be easily lowered or dropped later... like the un-official police policy for arresting "beer run" suspects.

Cal law allows cops to treat been runs in 2 ways: misdemeanor petty theft, or felony burglary... usually if the suspects are GOA with negligible investigatable leads: it's a petty theft 484PC, but if there are good leads or the suspects are caught.. they're "arrested" for felony burglary 459PC... it's a better stat and allows officers more investigation leverage.

Cops know it's rare for beer runners to be charged with 459, DAs routinely drop the charges to 488PC.. but under this new law DNA would be forced based on the arrest... cops will figure this out in a second and charge high to get your goo.

California cliff-notes definition of burglary 459PC- Every person who enters any house, room, apartment, tenement, shop, warehouse, store, mill, barn, stable, outhouse or other structure defined by law, with intent to commit grand or petty larceny or any felony is guilty of burglary
www.leginfo.ca.gov...



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 08:54 AM
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The bill has been removed from the link I previously provided.

It is still available here: H.R. 4614



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