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September 26th, 1983. The day the world almost ended.

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posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:01 PM
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On September 26th 1983, the Soviet Union's early warning radar system went off indicating that nuclear missiles were inbound from the United States.

To Soviet Lieutenant Colonel Stanislav Petrov, something just didn't feel right. His decision that day may have saved the world.



Another day the world almost ended

Most historians agree the Cuban missile crisis of 1962 was the closest we ever came to nuclear Armageddon. But one former Soviet officer knows of another episode.

For decades, men in bunkers watched their screens and warning lights every hour of every day, waiting for the Cold War to go nuclear.

This was the situation just after midnight on September 26th, 1983.

Stanislav Petrov was the Lieutenant Colonel in charge of the Soviet Union's early warning radar system in a bunker near Moscow.

Then it happened.

“When I first saw the alert message, I got up from my chair. All my subordinates were confused, so I started shouting orders at them to avoid panic. I knew my decision would have a lot of consequences,” Petrov recalls.

The radar was showing a single missile inbound from the United States.

Now the race was on: was it real or a computer error? His boss accepted over the phone it was a likely fault. But as soon as he hung up…

“The siren went off for a second time. Giant blood-red letters appeared on our main screen, saying START. It said that four more missiles had been launched,” Petrov continues.

To Petrov, it did not add up. Any attack by the US would have been all-out to try and cripple a Soviet response. But if they were real, he had only 30 minutes to tell his superiors before the warheads hit.

“My cozy armchair felt like a red hot frying pan and my legs went limp. I felt like I couldn't even stand up. That's how nervous I was when I was taking this decision,” Petrov says.

Petrov stuck to his decision, broke a Soviet military rule by not telling his superiors, and was proved right. There were no missiles.

Read more: RT



For those who think they live in scary times today, you don't know what scary is if you weren't alive during the height of the cold war.




posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:14 PM
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The cold war was all for show, it was a great fear generater as well as reason for each side to arm itself to the teeth and boost the military industrial complex. Leaders from both sides had been meeting behind the scenes, for example the handshake, both sides were to benefit from the show put on to the public to further ensure their control of their respective masses.

" His boss accepted over the phone it was a likely fault." - his boss probs knew nothing was going to happen, nothing was ever planned to happen, but the public had to be convinced it was a very volotile situation for the engineered deception to work.

[edit on 19-5-2010 by polarwarrior]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by polarwarrior
The cold war was all for show, it was a great fear generater as well as reason for each side to arm itself to the teeth and boost the military industrial complex.


Maybe, but what if one of those idiots in the trenches hadn't gotten the memo and pushed the button anyway?



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by FortAnthem

Originally posted by polarwarrior
The cold war was all for show, it was a great fear generater as well as reason for each side to arm itself to the teeth and boost the military industrial complex.


Maybe, but what if one of those idiots in the trenches hadn't gotten the memo and pushed the button anyway?


While I see what you're saying, no action of that proportion would have been handled without clearance from way up. Was never going to happen


LW



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by FortAnthem
 


Dear FortAnthem

I believe we came to within one minute of total inhalation at that time.

For what???

So your leaders and their leaders could think what big men they are.

The wars that are ongoing today are the same.

Your enemy is not the Taliban, not Alkida or any other terrorist group.

Your enemy is your leaders my leaders and any other leaders.

There have been wars in history that were necessary to fight but not many. In all war your leaders do not fight but the young men and boys die not to speak of the children.

Worst of all these days it is about money and power, but they still die.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:54 PM
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Stanislav Petrov is a hero, anyway that you look at it. If he would have been some hothead with a hair-trigger-finger, or some mindless idiot that the world seems to be full of today, then we might be having this discussion in a cave somewhere, between the fights over scraps of meat. Great thread!

--airspoon



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 09:32 PM
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To think, without Stanislav Petrov, 1984 would never have happened.




Then again, maybe that's not such a good thing.


[edit on 5/19/10 by FortAnthem]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 11:01 PM
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i agree the cold war was a way of controlling the masses with the fear of nuclear war (how many fall out shelters were built?) they never were going to use them. mutual assured destruction - mad. cause you would have to be insane to ever use nukes again. it's the new kids on the nuclear block i am worried about kim jong il and ahmadinejad they should not be allowed to develop nukes. they are both crazy enough to use them. dont we have the tech to create a emp pulse and send them both back into the dark ages (no pun intended)



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by gaurdian2012
 


Dear gaurdian2012

From gaurdian2012 “it's the new kids on the nuclear block i am worried about kim jong il and ahmadinejad they should not be allowed to develop nukes. they are both crazy enough to use them. dont we have the tech to create a emp pulse and send them both back into the dark ages (no pun intended)”

Ask yourself this, who has you feeling this way????

I will give you my answer, your leaders, it is necessary for them to have you feel this way.

This is your problem not some despot half a world away. These are the people you need to fear.



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 07:47 AM
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I wrote on this topic sometime ago, but the larger scope of the Cold War during that almost disastrous year. From a large scale NATO exercise misinterpreted by the USSR, to a shaky Russian leadership unclear on what to expect from Ronald Reagan following his "Evil Empire," speech, and old school geriatric leadership of the Soviet Union in Yuri Andropov who had severe mistrust of the West and had fears of a US preemptive strike akin to Adolf Hitler's Operation Barbarossa. Moreover, that year marked a time when the Soviet Union was on high alert, akin to the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. In other words, 1983 was a rotten year in more ways than just the music. Moreover, the bitter beast called Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) was frothing at the mouth.

The reason I bring up my old thread, is because there is a documentary about 1983 on it, and it discusses the heroics of the Lieutenant Colonel Stanislav Petrov.

Operation Able Archer-1983-Catastrophic game of Cat and Mouse

His difficult decision saved the world from annihilation. However, rather than being applauded by his superiors and government, he was relieved from his post, and sent to area of far less importance. He was relieved on a technicality and neglecting protocol.



He received no reward. According to Petrov, this was because the incident and other bugs that were found in the missile detection system embarrassed his superiors and the influential scientists who were responsible for the system, so that if he had been officially rewarded, they would have had to be punished.[1][3][9][10] He was reassigned to a less sensitive post,[10] took early retirement (although he emphasizes that he was not "forced out" of the army, as the case is presented by some Western sources)[9] and suffered a nervous breakdown.[10]

en.wikipedia.org...

Moreover, if he had followed procedure, we would be living in caves and staring at rocks all day. This man is truly a Hero of the Soviet Union, and if he has not been given that honor posthumously, he deserves it! Moreover, he ought to be given the Noble Peace Prize as well. His selfless act of courage, and at risk to himself and his career should not only be applauded, but the world owes him a deep sense of gratitude toward this man. On making the decision, here is what he had to say about the heroism of his actions.



"All that happened didn't matter to me — it was my job. I was simply doing my job, and I was the right person at the right time, that's all. My late wife for 10 years knew nothing about it. 'So what did you do?' she asked me. I did nothing."

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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the cold war was so we could stay on a WAR ECONOMY PROGRAM. So the banks and the arms industry could explore these new sciences without budget. Fear - so they could continue with a means of destroying the people of earth without the people of earth understanding that the real enemy is not the Russians but the whole population of earth. so, that is why when you research these projects they seem so broad and generic because they are - at the same time you have the UN gaining influence through Loans and Mandates and the like. gaining a global structure.
who ever these creatures are - they look like us and have been here probably for ever, we just need a way of detecting them - because as a whole they threaten to planet.



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Jakes51
 


Thanks for posting a link to that thread.


The vid said that sunlight reflected off of high altitude clouds set off the IR detectors of the Soviet's detection satillites.



After watching that vid, it seems there were events like this one all throughout 1983. It's no wonder the article I found was titled "ANOTHER day the world almost ended". I feel lucky to have survived to see puberty after watching that.

[edit on 5/23/10 by FortAnthem]



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by FortAnthem
 


Humanity really dodge the bullet with 1983, and it appeared the moon and stars were aligned for complete annihilation of mankind at that time? From severe mistrust on each sides, two hard-line leaders staring each other down, shoddy intelligence about the intentions of both sides, and a misinterpreted large scale NATO exercise. So, call it a perfect storm for Mutually Assured Destruction. I was absolutely flabbergasted after watching the documentary at how close we were to extinction that year during the eighties. Glad you enjoyed the documentary, and what a jaw dropper it was.



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