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Pre-Crime Policing

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posted on May, 19 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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Pre-Crime Policing


A SWAT team brings in a man and seizes his legally purchased guns—for a crime no one committed



To hear them tell it, the officers who apprehended 39-year-old David Pyles on March 8 thwarted a mass murder. The cops “were able to successfully take a potentially volatile male subject into protective custody for a mental evaluation,” the Medford, Oregon, police department announced in a press release. The subject had been placed on administrative leave from his job not long before, was “very disgruntled,” and had recently purchased several firearms. “Local Law Enforcement agencies were extremely concerned that the subject was planning retaliation against his employers,” the press release said. Fortunately, Pyles “voluntarily” turned himself over to police custody, and his legally purchased firearms “were seized for safekeeping.”

This supposedly voluntary exchange involved two SWAT teams, officers from Medford and nearby Roseburg, sheriff’s deputies from Jackson and Douglas counties, and the Oregon State Police. Pyles hadn’t committed any crime; nor was he suspected of having committed one. The police never obtained a warrant for either search or arrest. They never consulted with a judge or a mental health professional before sending military-style tactical teams to take Pyles in.

“They woke me up with a phone call at about 5:50 in the morning,” Pyles says. “I looked out the window and saw the SWAT team pointing their guns at my house. The officer on the phone told me to turn myself in. I told them I would, on three conditions. I would not be handcuffed. I would not be taken off my property. And I would not be forced to get a mental health evaluation. He agreed. The second I stepped outside, they jumped me. Then they handcuffed me, took me off my property, and took me to get a mental health evaluation.”


...more in article....




posted on May, 19 2010 @ 07:58 PM
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That's bull. Any adult (employed or not) should be able to buy a gun. The implications are obvious but this shows They Are Watching US, especially if we buy guns. He's lucky he wasn't diagnosed with a mental illness (which isn't too hard these days), because if he was he would never see his guns again. He also had to do a 2nd background check to re-obtain his guns! This country is screwy...



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 


Sorry, what a load of crap, he did nothing whatsoever.

There's nothing at all to suggest there was a reason for Pyles to be arrested.

Because his Union contract stipulated this to happen?

Wow, some contract, guarantees arrest and or weapons seizure, if terminated.

No dice, I hope this is seriously looked into, and proper procedure is followed towards termination.

For the Law Enforcement Officers, all of them, hopefully their Union Contract does not have the same stipulations, because someone will come knocking on their doors.

In Florida, we have what's called the Baker Act, if someone is a threat to themselves or others.

While I am not sure of Oregon law, I feel the man named Bloom, was mis-quoted.

So, his being flagged by his background check, and Union contract sounds bogus.

[edit on 19-5-2010 by SpartanKingLeonidas]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by SpartanKingLeonidas
For the Law Enforcement Officers, all of them, hopefully their Union Contract does not have the same stipulations, because someone will come knocking on their doors.


What I can't seem to find is how exactly law enforcement was prompted to watch this guy. He was a DOT employee. If it did have something to do with unions this is quite frightening, especially with the union fluffer running the country right now.

As scary as this story is, there's a lot of details that aren't illustrated. I'm concerned that maybe the missing pieces may be more disturbing than the surface story.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by SpartanKingLeonidas
For the Law Enforcement Officers, all of them, hopefully their Union Contract does not have the same stipulations, because someone will come knocking on their doors.


What I can't seem to find is how exactly law enforcement was prompted to watch this guy. He was a DOT employee. If it did have something to do with unions this is quite frightening, especially with the union fluffer running the country right now.

As scary as this story is, there's a lot of details that aren't illustrated. I'm concerned that maybe the missing pieces may be more disturbing than the surface story.


When purchasing weapons you go through a criminal background check.

That's the only way this man could have been flagged about the purchases.

As for the Union contract that smacks of a load of crap.

I would be interested to read that contract because it makes it sound as if he was terminated for some sort of semi-illegal activity upon his former employees grounds.

Being a former Security Officer the Baker Act would bring many people in, under that, to our hospital, via Law Enforcement Officers, and it was easily misused.

I followed a trail and found illicit activities between the mental facility and Law Enforcement.

Now, I am not stating all Law Enforcement Officers, but the ones in my area in regards to the mental facility and Baker Act, when homeless people were brought in for no other reason than being drunk to need to go to the psyche facility.

I asked many questions and got to the bottom of it and it was that the State paid for each body occupying a bed within the mental facility and a dirty psychiatrist.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by SpartanKingLeonidas
Now, I am not stating all Law Enforcement Officers, but the ones in my area in regards to the mental facility and Baker Act, when homeless people were brought in for no other reason than being drunk to need to go to the psyche facility.

I asked many questions and got to the bottom of it and it was that the State paid for each body occupying a bed within the mental facility and a dirty psychiatrist.


There's a rumor here in the Atlanta area that in a certain metro country which contains a huge corporate-owned jail facility..... that the corporate owner is paying $240 per incarceration to the precincts making the arrest. Now, it is just a rumor, and maybe I'm incorrect on the details, but your kickback scheme reminded me of this. Is it possible that financial incentives prompt "pre-crime policing"? Who knows, but it seems that in your referenced case in Florida, someone is using the Baker Act to their advantage. Something to ponder.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 


I have no doubt that there's an incentive program.

In the larger scheme of things corruption lies within all levels of Law Enforcement.

That is where the Internal Affairs Division comes into play.

Now, I could have said something to I.A.D., but it would not have done a damn thing.

Except to get Law Enforcement pissed off at me and that's a waste of my time.

It would have been a one-sided war, I would have won, I was raised by a former Marine.



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