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L.A. Mayor Dismisses Warning That Arizona Could Cut Off Power Over Boycott

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posted on May, 20 2010 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by RedCairo
 





My understanding from the letter was that:

1) As AZ owns the power,

The State of Arizona does not "own" the power. The various utility companies do.



they could "renegotiate terms" -- meaning, it will cost you a lot more; and

The State of Arizona has no authority to negotiate interstate utility rates.



2) If CA was so sincere about a boycott, then California should be boycotting power, not just boycotting things convenient for them. This is matter of California's principles actually being put to the test.

Boycotts are always limited. When the US boycotts Cuban sugar it doesn't boycott Cuban natural gas supply to Guantanamo (at least when the boycott began anyway).




posted on May, 21 2010 @ 01:30 PM
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Arizona should welcome California refusing to do business with it, it's not like we have any money to pay our bills anyway. I live in LA, believe me if I could boycott Villaraigosa I would! Scumbag that he is, changed his name to his wife's because it was more Hispanic sounding, one of his first acts as mayor was to stop the police from investigating illegals. Funny he'd take his wife's last name but has no problem cheating on her left and right with his Telemundo news anchors and all. I wish we could vote out every single piece of scum we have in office in this state but the people are idiots here. Not gonna happen. If all my family wasn't here I'd have moved long ago. What is there to encourage anyone to stay besides the weather? No jobs (unless you're fluent in Spanish), taxes are too high, real estate is astronomical, crime is too high, it's polluted, the government makes the Obama and Bush administration look like well oiled machines and the city I grew up in now resembles your typical Tijuana $@#*hole. Can't drive anywhere without someone trying to sell you fruit standing on the corner and seeing cars parked on lawns where 3-4 extended families are living in a 2 bedroom house.



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 01:30 AM
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Originally posted by rnaa
The State of Arizona does not "own" the power. The various utility companies do.

The State of Arizona has no authority to negotiate interstate utility rates.

Boycotts are always limited. When the US boycotts Cuban sugar it doesn't boycott Cuban natural gas supply to Guantanamo (at least when the boycott began anyway).

Thank you for your assistance. I believe you; this is certainly not any area of expertise for me; I was providing my interpretation of the 'social-sly implications' that seemed to read through the letter. Apparently, however, all of those are completely impossible, so my entire take on what the Arizona leader thought or 'was saying' were inaccurate.

That leaves me a bit afloat though so perhaps you could translate what he is saying and 'implying' since, as you note above, everything that appears to be said/implied is impossible.

Thanks,
RC



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 03:45 AM
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reply to post by RedCairo
 





That leaves me a bit afloat though so perhaps you could translate what he is saying and 'implying' since, as you note above, everything that appears to be said/implied is impossible.


He is simply blowing smoke to make himself look tough. He can make life difficult for utility companies operating in the state the next time their supply contracts are due, that's all.

The fact is that if electricity from Arizona was denied to LA, the Arizona utility companies would go out of business, thousands of Arizonans would lose their jobs, and LA would buy its electricity from Utah or Nevada or Oregon or Texas or whatever. And by the way, he'd lose his own job at the next election (which might well happen anyway).

Arizona and its citizens would be the only losers.

[edit on 22/5/2010 by rnaa]



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by demonseed
As much as i agree with you on the "bigger picture", i have to say you really dont understand how bad the problem is...

rant removed...


Actually, how can you say I don't understand how bad the problem is? I said right in my post that I wasn't taking sides. Maybe you just used my post to jump into the thread, or perhaps you didn't really read it at all.


you really think these illegals have it bad?


I guess you didn't read my post because here you are lumping an entire group together. I'm not condoning illegal immigration in any way, but do you know any illegals? Do you really know what some of them go through and how bad their lives were to risk everything to come here? Again, I'm not saying it's justified, but these are humans, so you might want to apply some humanity to your position.


Free food, healthcare, schooling and in some cases housing meanwhile they dont pay ANY taxes and make almost the same amount of money as a citizen. How is this fair one bit?


You're actually quite wrong on this one. Yes, this happens in some cases and yes it's a major stress on our already failing economy, but your generalized statement, as presented, is wrong and uninformed.

-Greyling



posted on May, 22 2010 @ 11:46 PM
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Originally posted by blujay
reply to post by Greyling2012
 


That's what I think as I read thru these posts.

They are falling right in line with what is expected of them. Get them to fight with each other. Then we will have to step in and make more rules so they feel safe again. Blah Blah, haven't we seen this show before?
Reruns are so boring.


Exactly!

They are being reactionary and "playing the victim" instead of coming up with innovative ways of "stimulating" our GOVT to come up with humane AND effective border and immigration policies (and to enforce them without stooping to yet a lower level on the humanitarian scale).

-Greyling



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 02:44 AM
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Actually I do agree a little with Greyling on a couple points. First, that despite the many negative statistics, there are often exceptional hard working human beings who risked their lives to try and come here because their own country is a hellhole.

It is difficult to resent people for doing the same thing I would do in their place.

I had a friend many years ago that I discovered was illegal, and her story was tragic. She was the only girl in a huge family and for high school graduation her entire extended family spent 5 years combining money to buy her passage to the USA in the hope it would give her a better life. She made it (barely, after a harrowing experience) to Los Angeles where she literally became an abused slave housekeeper in a big house with tons of them and I literally mean *slavery* with horrible abuse, insane conditions and no way of escape. (You know, like 18/6.5 shifts, chronic sleep deprivation, beating and hair shaving for infractions, living on top of many others in cramped spaces, rule by terror and so little money for that effort she could barely afford food and stamps.) Her letters finally got to a remote (legal) relative in Ventura county who drove down and literally smuggled her secretly out of the house and up to that county. She was 19 and the sweetest person I knew, and worked harder than anybody I knew.

People like her would be an asset to any country. She could easily have married or had a child and, being beautiful, was constantly offered by legals of every race that choice in exchange for a different kind of slavery I guess you could say but refused. She wanted to speak english but had a hard time finding resources for that and I worked with her on that a bit. Despite the crazy immigration numbers from mexico (I mean legal) it's not easy at all so it's not like the suggestions, "Oh, just apply and then come here legally!" are realistic-- almost nobody who applies, in the comparative numbers, gets here, or her family would not have risked her life and more combined money than their poverty would ever again see in bulk to try and buy her a better life.

I do understand that it is only one person's story and that no matter how tragic her situation, she was illegally here and that was that. (Later when her mother became ill, and she had 7 brothers under age 16, she voluntarily gave up a better life than she'd ever have, to go home to help her mom.)

I admit that I was incredibly shocked that she was able to get a drivers license, work, an apartment, etc. while being illegal, that kind of blew my mind.

And I get that there's sob-stories from all over and none of this makes a dent in the very legitimate complaints that eveyr state and the nation have about the tidal wave of illegal immigrants from cuba, mexico, and asia in particular.

But it underscores the point that I made in one of my first posts on this or some related thread:

1 - Actual PLANS -- reasonable, human plans -- for what we are going to do in situations where children are involved need to be made. Children born here are citizens. We cannot just deport their parents and orphan them; we cannot deport citizens; it is not that there is not a (probably horrible) solution, it is that I don't hear anybody talking about a strategy for this situation, and it's such a common situation, people should be. This is a human situation not just a legal situation. The right of law is no excuse to be inhumane. It is one thing to want to be rid of criminals without concern, or rid of illegals sooner rather than later, but it is another thing to have no compassion for human beings trapped in a bad situation.

2 - Consideration of what is going to happen at the border or Mexico side may not be "our problem" technically but it is our problem morally. Kidnapped children and white women are a good slave trade going south already as we know, and hispanics are just as likely to fall into that category -- or just be shot -- since they have nothing and no power and the Mexican 'government' and 'police' are allegedly as corrupt as the cartels that have more power than they do. We cannot control the Mexican government (heck, as the recent and never ending bailout, corporate takeovers and O-care shows, we cannot control even our own country), but that doesn't mean that serious conversation and consideration should not be had about this life or death issue.

I understand (being a flaming conservative myself) that these points do not override the issue of 'illegal-meaning-ILLEGAL'.

But the right to do something does not make it right, and I'm surprised there has not been more public discussion about plans, and common situations, and what can be done.

Here's just one example. Maybe there are people who would happily take whatever they've got and go home to any family they have in Mexico right now, as a result of these laws and others starting. But are afraid to lest they be arrested before they reach the border, stripped of any money/goods, and left criminals/slaves in deportation--if they have children this is an even huger threat. Maybe we could set up some official stations that would help arrange travel tickets to get them to wherever in Mexico or south america they need to go (the corruption in deportation/border cities might otherwise kill or divest them of everything before they can get anywhere), and doing this could keep them from being seized and deported in a 3-week period that might occur before those trips occur (one needs to buy in advance or pricing is even crazier/unaffordable). MAYBE a lot of people would actually leave our country voluntarily if this kind of help/protection were provided for.

I know this is only one small avenue and not a whole solution. But my point is that nobody seems to be talking about this kind of thing, and I wonder why not.

RC



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 03:32 AM
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Originally posted by RedCairo


Star my friend, and well said. I commend you on having the courage as a flaming conservative to show some true humanism - seems a rare thing from that side these days.


One of humanities great gifts from nature is the ability to be compassionate, and another is to solve problems. You offer a good one at the end of your post. I can't help thinking that we could employ a fair deal of people here to either help re-integrate illegals in their country of origin (or perhaps elsewhere with the cooperation of other Govts.), or to come up with innovative ways to work with neighboring countries to prop up each other (while still remaining completely sovereign), so there wouldn't be so much incentive for illegals to take such risks in fleeing their country for a better (or easier) life.

There are so many complexities to this situation, especially when children are involved (as you aptly pointed out), that the knee-jerk "redneck" stance of "ship 'em all back" just doesn't work, nor is it even remotely compassionate or worthy of attitudes that should be coming from a progressive (not necessarily in the political sense), advanced, educated society. I think humans can do better.

-Greyling

PS Just to drive the point home again, this 'let California's electricity run dry so they fall into the ocean' BS is just plain pig-headed and immature. Those are fellow LEGAL AMERICANS you're talking about... so now your problem is with illegal aliens AND legal citizens that just happen to have nice beaches in their backyards (at least until BP strikes out this way - hehe)? What's next, darkies, queers and any artists that exercise free speech in their work? Let's at least pretend for a moment that we ARE actually civilized and enlightened, and work harder to solve these issues.

[edit on 23-5-2010 by Greyling2012]




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