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SCI/TECH: Is The World's Oil Running Out?

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posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 01:38 AM
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It seems the world's oil crisis may be worse than previously thought. At least geologist Dr. Campbell thinks so. Let's face it, our world demands a lot of oil and has for a long time. Mabey it's starting to finally catch up with us. And letting the world know could have catastrophic effects on economy. We have declining production, increasing demand, and no new oil fields being discovered. And it's best if no one knows?
 

Is The World's Oil Running Out?

The adherents of the peak oil theory warn the decline of world oil output will force oil prices higher for good, and that the knock on effects could be catastrophic.

"In my opinion, unfortunately, there will be no linear change," says Iran's Ali Bakhtiari. "There will only be sudden explosive change."

"The people who will be least affected will be the super poor, who already have no access to energy, and the super rich who do not care if oil is $100 a barrel."

"It is everyone who is in the middle who will be hurt the most," says Mr Bakhtiari. "When the crisis comes there will be enormous changes."

We have declining production, increasing demand, and no new oil fields being discovered. And it's best if no one knows?

[edit on 8-6-2004 by Zion Mainframe]




posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 04:38 AM
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It is this crisis that our generation refuses to face. We do not have that long before the lights in the west will flicker and die. We live in an indsutrialised society, everything relies upon oil. Many geoligists claim that the peak oil crisis is only decades away or less. What are we going to do ?



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 05:35 AM
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The Saudis reported a couple of weeks ago that they have vastly underestimated their obtainable oil reserves.

www.arabnews.com...

Sure, we'll eventually run out, but if the Saudi research is correct it's going to be a case of later not sooner.

Of course, the Saudis could be wrong and many experts are questioning their statement but it's too soon to say. Tripling their estimate of recoverable oil sure does make a big difference though.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 05:39 AM
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I've posted this link many times because I've found that many many people have never heard about this product. While its not a perfect solution the fact that it can help reduce our dependence on petroleum and at the same time enrich american farmers is to me an amazing thing.
www.biodiesel.org...



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 08:42 AM
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I've always thrown about these Ideas in my head it seems there's always more to it I just hope they find a good alternative (if they haven't already)

Here's a site I found just searching

www.davidicke.net/mysteries/reports/oil.html

[edit on 8-6-2004 by thegreat59]

[edit on 8-6-2004 by thegreat59]



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 08:44 AM
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i heard that it will be gone by 2060 at currwent rates



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 08:47 AM
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The best site I've found on this subject is www.fromthewilderness.com its mirror site: www.copvcia.com

I highly recommend it for anyone seriously looking into this most grave issue.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 09:24 AM
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I recently read the book Hubbert's Peak, The Impending World Oil Shortage by petroleum geologist Kenneth Deffeyes, and from that book, and quite a bit of weeding fact from fluff through Google, it seems that we are in bigger trouble than is being reported. The projected peak of world oil production, based on exploration data, estimated reserves, and the peak of US oil production(which occurred in 1970), should be within years, not decades. I've seen estimates as early as this year, and as late as 2008, but no later. I could well be wrong, and I hope that I am, but there are knowledgable people who aren't disinterested, (i.e. they have a lot to lose if it happens) that are saying that we need help, quick. (Here I'm referencing Matthew Simmons, an investment banker in Houston, TX, who is very concerned about this issue and is also rather outspoken about it, as well.) I do think that this needs more research, and serious attention from people like us here at ATS, and I also believe that the search for viable renewable energy sources has never been more important than right now. Even if the peak is 20 years away, our entire infrastructure is based on oil, and 20 years would barely be enough time to convert to renewable sources. As it stands, we probably don't even have that much time. It's important, here, to mention that we are not going to run completely out of oil. Ever. But, it will become economically non-viable as an energy source, as it will eventually take more energy to extract the oil than the oil is worth, (energy wise). Financially, the prices will skyrocket as demand for oil outstrips supply. Therein lies the rub. It's cheap oil that we're running out of. And, all western economies rely on oil as a cheap energy base for growth. I'd say that this is a definite wake-up call for all of us. I'm all for optimism, but this requires intelligence as well, and mine is telling me that it's time to begin preparing for the coming storm.

[edit on 8-6-2004 by Ouizel]



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 10:58 AM
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The U.S. invaded and is occupying Iraq for the forseeable future for three reasons:

1. To keep OPEC from going with the Euro

2. To take control of the remaining Mesopotamian reserves (to take China out of that game).

3. To reshape the mid-east in Israel's image.

In that order. Were OPEC to switch their trading currency to the Euro, the U.S. economy would crash in short order. Make no mistake about that. If you are doubt, research it.

Americans had better get ready for the inevitable. This war will not end. It will only get worse.

The time for arguing if the war in Iraq was/is right or wrong is over. We should spend our energies now on how to improve the situation in-country in every aspect. Security. Rebuilding infrastructure. Employment. Health.

We broke it. We own it. Like it or not. We must now fix it, for the people of Iraq. And for what may well come to us down in Saudi.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 12:33 PM
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Thats may well be true, but if the oil will run out soon what good does it do us to be in control of an area that eventualy will be worthless and only give us problems.

I think the biggest reason for the current oil shortage is the growth of the Chinese econony, its so big that we are having a hard time meeting the demand of its industries. I don't see how we can use up the entire reserve of oil which has been building up for millions of years in less than 200 years. I think there is still a great deal left to be found and drilled. The problem for now is pumping out enough oil to meet the demand for an ever growing world economy. I do think though that we need to find a more powerful and more efficient way of producing energy because our demand will only increase with time, and oil is very limited in its efficiency and problematic in the polution it creates.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by mwm1331
I've posted this link many times because I've found that many many people have never heard about this product. While its not a perfect solution the fact that it can help reduce our dependence on petroleum and at the same time enrich american farmers is to me an amazing thing.
www.biodiesel.org...


Biodiesel is just starting to take off in Toronto. Already in just 12 months we hard our first 3 pumps installed that are dedicated to Biodiesel. More are planned but before that can happen more farmers are gonna have to jump on the band wagon cuz production is pretty tight for biodiesel. BTW gas prices vs. biodiesel prices right now in Toronto are: Gas: .85 - .95 c per Gallon Biodiesel .72 c/gallon



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 03:23 PM
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What are normal diesel prices though, they're lower then gas I know that.
Good side effect of the huge resource demand of the Chinese economy, I'm thinking that they're a big buyer of Russian natural resources giving their economy a good kick-start. I'm also glad to live in B.C., lots of Hydro-power should keep us running half decently when we start getting a real squeeze in oil prices.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 04:08 PM
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Regular diesel is about the same as biodiesel but Biodiesel is much cleaner.

[edit on 8-6-2004 by sardion2000]



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 05:11 PM
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I think it is about time someone has bought light to this topic. It's no conspiracy, the world's supply of fuel oil will run out! If "we the people" don't wise up to the fact that we are running on a 1/4 tank it's back to the stone age.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 09:12 PM
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Agreed, this is the most underdiscussed topic on ATS.

The best peak oil site I've found is www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net...

What makes this topic so bloody scary is how diverse and highly reputable those who most believe in it are.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 10:56 PM
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How does this relate to Science and Tech? They need to move this thread..



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 11:12 PM
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The members here are quite familiar with supply versus demand constraints of petrocarbons. Also, many in society are becoming aware of the problem. For instance, witness the cover story of this month's National Geographic regarding the end of cheap oil.

ATS has many discussions and such regarding the phenomenon of peak oil. As examples, below are listed a few links.

Oil Supply and Demand - An ATSNN Outlook

Is Peak Oil Real?

Peak Oil

Oil Post

Among these discussion items are links to many resources on the web. Indeed, the topic is quite important at present. Unfortunately, the actual peak of production will only be apparent a few years after it occurs.



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 11:18 PM
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The world's oil supply started running out when drilling for oil started. Oil takes (FILL IN THIS BLANK) thousands of years to be formed from peat and it is not a renewable resource for our species.

It was always a finite supply. Fast buck oil merchants and market manipulators and motor industry conglomerates locked into internal combustion engine plants are those who stand to lose by switching to more reasonable energy sources.

Also did oil ever have a purpose of "lubricating" anything inside mother earth?

Ummmm... this kind of related to Science & Technology in my mind better than it does to Terror Analysis?



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 11:20 PM
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No, we're not running out of oil.

First of all, the Earth's crust is 50 miles thick; our deepest drills can barely go more than a mile deep.

Second, like a previous poster showed, our current oil reserves are much more vast than some previously thought.

Third, it has been shown that oil can be artifically created with carbon and lots of heat and pressure; there are even plans to start manufacturing artificial oil and gas in the future.

Fourth, we're going to have something better as an alternative by the time we get to a "crisis" point in oil supply anyway.


Edit: Let's also not forget that much of Africa and Asia are 3rd world countries full of completely untapped resources!



[edit on 6/8/2004 by ThunderCloud]



posted on Jun, 8 2004 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by ThunderCloud
First of all, the Earth's crust is 50 miles thick; our deepest drills can barely go more than a mile deep.

Second, like a previous poster showed, our current oil reserves are much more vast than some previously thought.

Third, it has been shown that oil can be artifically created with carbon and lots of heat and pressure; there are even plans to start manufacturing artificial oil and gas in the future.

Fourth, we're going to have something better as an alternative by the time we get to a "crisis" point in oil supply anyway.



Of course we are running out of oil and have been since the first petroleum production well was drilled in 1859. Otherwise, the four points made are easily refuted:

(1) - The deepest boreholes are many miles deep and Earth's crust has variable thicknesses, even on the continents.

(2) - As noted the previous post, the veracity of the Saudi claim is dubious.

(3) - Biodiesel and similar fuels, to which you apparently refer, has long been produced from a variety of materials. Unfortunately, more energy is required to produce it than is derived from it, just as is the case with ethanol.

(4) - When is the crisis point and what would define it? Mere optimism is not factual, it is an attitude that I personally share. However, accurate modeling that has been well-tested since the 1950's is predictive of peak oil extraction capability within the present decade. "Hubbert's Peak" of 1970 is but a precursor to the current situation.



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