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Tarballs reported at Key West beach; surveys continue Tuesday

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posted on May, 17 2010 @ 11:39 PM
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Tarballs reported at Key West beach; surveys continue Tuesday


www.palmbeachpost.com

The U.S. Coast Guard and marine scientists will be surveying shorelines in the Keys Tuesday morning to see if they find more tarballs after many were found today on Key West beaches.

Park rangers at For Zachary Taylor State Park found tarballs throughout the day - about three an hour - at the park and nearby Navy beach at Truman annex, according to a Coast Guard news release late tonight.
Coast Guard pollution investigators responded to this morning's report of 20 tarballs at Fort Zachary...
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 17 2010 @ 11:39 PM
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Wow, oil is already at the Florida Keys. So much for BP's assurances that Florida was unlikely to be impacted.

Next stop -- Atlantic Seaboard -- for what's shaping up to be the environmental disaster of the century.

I think when it's all said and done, this massive oil spill (2 Exxon Valdez's a week) will exceed Chernobyl in overall damage.

www.palmbeachpost.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:04 AM
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Unfortunately It wont be the only thing washing up on the beaches,and enevitably onto our plates , Fn shame ,poor world

=epic human FAIL




[edit on 18-5-2010 by all2human]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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I like the idea of burning the oil.

Look at this way Nero played the fiddle while Rome burned. We get to set the ocean on fire as we Americans play our fiddle. /Sarcasm/

what Fn mess, I fell sick whenever I try to wrap my head around the size and scope of what the long-term effects are.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by jacksmoke
 


Nero didn't play the fiddle as it wasn't invented until the 15th century and he was 35 miles away at his seaside home at the time



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:48 AM
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This is a HUGE development. I expected it would receive more attention.

Is everyone just sick of the story, disgusted or both?



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Nah, just waiting for Doc Velocity or Just Wondering to show up and tell you how wrong you are and that this is not only not a bad thing but it is somehow a really super good thing.

edit to change what was here-. They showed footage of the dead zone that is already there and comes in each year off the coast from fertilizer runoff. They are just measuring huge drops in oxygen in very large areas and said it could lead to more huge dead zones. My bad.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by K J Gunderson]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 01:09 AM
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It sickens me to think of how much life will be lost to this.

I can't even imagine how long this will effect our environment. :shk:



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:21 AM
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OK folks. Anyone feeling just a bit guilty over driving a gas guzzler yet, or any fossil fueled vehicle for that matter?

WE are responsible for this mess because we didn't demand a cleaner source to fuel our transportation needs. If we weren't buying the gas/petrol they wouldn't be drilling for the oil.

Those "bad" oil companies are only doing their thing because "we the public" buy their dirty wares.

Shame on us.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by wayno
 

This immense and incalculable disaster should be enough reason in itself for an alternative energy Manhattan Project to fast-track hydrogen/electric vehicles or in the short term, abandon fossil fuel vehicles in favor of ethanol, as Brazil has done. There are no longer any light vehicles in Brazil running on pure gasoline.

Death to Big Oil!



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:48 AM
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Originally posted by K J Gunderson
reply to post by GoldenFleece
 


Nah, just waiting for Doc Velocity or Just Wondering to show up and tell you how wrong you are and that this is not only not a bad thing but it is somehow a really super good thing.

edit to change what was here-. They showed footage of the dead zone that is already there and comes in each year off the coast from fertilizer runoff. They are just measuring huge drops in oxygen in very large areas and said it could lead to more huge dead zones. My bad.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by K J Gunderson]



HAHA! Yeah, we just keep downplaying the significance of our lifestyle, but soon (next 100 years, maybe less) it will catch up and affect to many too be ignored.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by SmokeandShadow]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:54 AM
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This is a disaster of huge proportions. Again we are being lied to. The volume of oil coming out of that well is reported to be in the millions of barrels per day instead of the 200,000gallons we have been told.

The well head is on the bottom of the gulf under 5000 feet of water. The well is nearly 20,000 feet deep. The pressure of the oil is tremendous. No human can work at that depth, it must be done by robotic devices. One engineer at Redstone Arsenal says it is impossible to cap the well with our current technology.

That massive flow of oil will find its way into the Gulf Stream and when it does it if has not already... we are all toast.

It is being called an "Extinction Level Event" on a par with a massive asteroid hit.

It is time to hunt down those who have kept from us the technology that would have made fossil fuels obsolete and express our displeasure with their greed.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 04:19 AM
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Originally posted by expat2368


It is being called an "Extinction Level Event" on a par with a massive asteroid hit.



Whoa, now you can't say that and not post a source, preferably a credible one...oh, who am I kidding its the internet. Really though, please explain.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 04:34 AM
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Relax guys, this is nothing compared to the size of the Gulf Coast and plus didn't you guys hear that the oil is being sucked out already...

ah you gloomers make me laugh!


end of sarcastic post.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by SmokeandShadow
 

Don't know how credible you'll find this, but if this guy's calculations are correct, an extinction level event is not beyond the realm of possibility:


We begin on a quasi-optimistic note this morning with an important announcement! The missing "weak force" in physics has been found. It turns out to be the weak connection between people's media-perceptions and their ability to operate a dime store calculator. This discovery is why our premium service Peoplenomics.com spent Sunday writing about all the "Lying About ELE's Part One". That's extinction level events.

Sunday's report this week focused in particular on the reports of huge underwater plumes of oil. And how big are the plumes? Most of the reports on the keyword "plume" very carefully give only two numbers - a length and depth, or a length and width, so doing the math requires some diligence on a readers part to come up with facts.

However, credit to the NY Times and MSNBC for their report on Saturday which contained all three numbers: 10 miles long, 3 miles wide, and 300 feet thick.

So let's discount the hell out of even these numbers and see where it leads us, shall we?

The length of the underwater plume (which is of heaviest crude components like asphalt and paraffin and such) is given as 10 miles.

The width is reported as 3 miles. But because we expect it's only 3 miles wide at its widest, maybe it's only one-eighth of a mile wide (660') on average, or some smaller fraction like that.

And while the thickness is given as "300 feet", let's use one-sixth that number -- just 50 feet -- and then run out some basic numbers and see if the reported 210,000 gallons per day being spoon-fed to the MSM is anywhere near measured reality, shall we?

10 miles L = 52800 feet X 660 feet W = 34,848,000 sq/ft

H X 50 feet = 1,742,400,000 cu/ft

Gal/CuFt X 7.48 = 13,033,152,000 gallons

Days / 28 = 465,469,714 Gal/Day / 42 = 11,082,612 BBL/Day

Peoplenomics this weekend went on to cite the references, like how many gallons are in a cubic foot - that and how many gallons are in an average swimming pool.

The spoon-fed MSM number of 210,000 gallons per day would mean a spill of 11 average swimming pools a day and since we're 28 days into the event, about 300 swimming pools of oil.

One of the numbers is obviously bull#. Either BP & the gov't are underplaying the hell out of this hoping to avoid wholesale panic around the Gulf Coast states (can't blame 'em...) OR this 'oil volcano' continues to be an extinction level event in the works.

www.independencejournal.com...



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 08:16 AM
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BP estimate: 210,000 gallons a day or about 11 swimming pools/day -- X 28 days = 300 swimming pools. Imagine a rectangle of 10 by 30 swimming pools.

ONE sighted oil plume: 10 miles long by 3 miles wide by 300 feet deep.

BP and our lovely government wouldn't lie to us, would they?



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 09:23 AM
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I heard something about this on the news the other day. They had experts stating the major fear now is when the oil reaches the gulf current, and if it does, the spill could hit Mississippi and Florida. Now, it seems the fears have come true, and the affects from this disaster has reached Florida shores. Who knows where this crap is going to go from there? This disaster gives me the creeps, and I think it is far more serious than we are being told. It is an epic failure of the oil company and the US Government. At the depths of 5,000 ft., it seems very difficult to fix this problem. It seems 5,000 ft is far above human crush depth, correct? Apparently, the US Navy Sea Wolf class nuclear attack submarine, cannot safely navigate at those depths.



Modern nuclear attack submarines like the American Seawolf class are estimated to have a test depth of 1,600 feet (490 m),[1] which would imply (see above) a collapse depth of 2,400 feet (730 m).

en.wikipedia.org...-fasman-rsrd-0

All BS and rhetoric aside, we have a situation on par with Chernobyl or far worse, as some have claimed. Some of the videos and photos I have seen really makes you gasp at the sheer size and scope of this disaster. The pictures tell a thousand words, and heightens the seriousness of the disaster.

Any idea what the PSI levels are? It looks like a lot of pressure there. Very creepy video.



Apparently, humanity has another marvel to be seen from space, and not the Great Wall of China.



Once again, the pictures and the video tell a thousand words. The bureaucrats, politicians, and oil executives can spin and fudge the facts all they want. One thing is for certain, we have a national disaster of epic proportions on our hands. This disaster can be seen from frigging space! Now, it is in gulf stream, which will spread this refuse both far and wide. So, tarballs off the coast of Florida now? Man, this stuff only gets better by the day, and they have no idea what this disaster is capable of.


[edit on 18-5-2010 by Jakes51]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by Freedom_is_Slavery
reply to post by jacksmoke
 


Nero didn't play the fiddle as it wasn't invented until the 15th century and he was 35 miles away at his seaside home at the time


Fine, not historically accurate, completely made up, but it is a nice description of the goverment gleefully ignoring the destruction of the land and people.

Literalists are my new pet peeve.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by SmokeandShadow

Originally posted by expat2368


It is being called an "Extinction Level Event" on a par with a massive asteroid hit.



Whoa, now you can't say that and not post a source, preferably a credible one...oh, who am I kidding its the internet. Really though, please explain.


I don't have a source, but I will qualify that statement for you anyway. The wetlands along the Gulf Coast are the nesting and breeding grounds for many endangered species. The Monarch Butterfly is probably the most fragile. The trek across the Gulf to the Yucatan peninsula every year, and they stop off in these wetlands. Imagine landing in oil slicked wetlands and waters. Bye-bye Monarch Butterflyes!

The Sea Turtles are Federally protected and sensitive to such minor interuptions as leaving a deck or dock light on. The population is dwindling and thousands of volunteers walk all the beaches of Florida during the year to flag off nesting sites. Counties regulate the hours that lights can be used on the beaches. This is a very delicate balance of protection for these turtles. I wonder how they will take to oil filled nests and I wonder how the new hatchlings will do trying to navigate and breath through oil slicks.

Sea Birds are kind of a given after the Exxon Valdez. We all know what oil does to sea birds, but the wetlands of Florida, Mississippi, and Louisianna are breeding and nesting grounds for these birds. The impacts will be far worse than the Valdez, AK spill.

Now, let us not underestimate the human impact. The filter fish and bottom of the food chain will be the first impacted. The toxic effects will go right on up the chain to humans. A large portion of the world gets their sustenance from the sea, and without seafood, people will starve!

What about droughts and severe storms. A thin sheen of oil across the surface of the Gulf and Atlantic Ocean will limit dehydration, cause drought, and raise the Ocean Temperatures drastically. Imagine very severe storms with limited rain events. Hurrican Season is coming up quickly, and the Gulf of Mexico is already at a record high temperature for this time of the year.

Extinction Level Event is a no-brainer. The only debate is who will get extincted first. I think it will be insects, larvae, butterflyes, etc., but I also think within 2 years we will be talking about the danger of mass extinctions in the animal world and severe situations in the human world.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by expat2368
 





It is time to hunt down those who have kept from us the technology that would have made fossil fuels obsolete and express our displeasure with their greed.


The technology that would make fossil fuels obsolete is attached to your trunk, and they are called legs.

These remarkable instruments can not only carry you through processes known as walking, running, and skipping, but can do things like peddle a bicycle!

The truth is that as long as our society wants to act like addicts in Alcoholics Anonymous where people aren’t responsible for their ‘disease’ and can only overcome it through co-dependence of others acting more responsibly than one’s self, and urging you to do the same, we are going to stumble from one disaster to another.

Who am I? I am the guy who rides a bicycle and walks every place; you must be the other guy!

But hey while we are looking for scapegoats for our own individual and collective foolishness and lack of common sense:



In Washington, a top Interior official charged with overseeing oil and gas drilling resigned, and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano defended the administration's handling of the emergency at the same time she said it was largely dependent on BP to respond to the crisis.

Chris Oynes, who had overseen oil and gas leasing in the Gulf of Mexico for 12 years before being promoted to Mineral Management Services associate director for offshore energy and minerals management, sent a letter of resignation effective May 31. Oynes has come under fire for being too close to the industry officials he regulated.






www.miamiherald.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">MiamiHerald.com

The Government loves to play the blame game too.

So with the blind leading the blind, on behalf of the corporations who enslave us all to the conveniences for a hefty profit that make us forget things like WE HAVE LEGS, there will be no shortage of people to blame who have forgotten and hate to be reminded YOU HAVE LEGS.

Don't be afraid to use them!




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