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Limewire is Doomed by RIAA Action

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posted on May, 17 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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End of an era



Limewire looks to be going down. Millions of people know the application as their first introduction to the joys of free downloads*



It's a mainstay for many and a stepping stone to P2P clients like uTorrent and Azureus for others. I was a kid in the candy store when I first ran Limewire. Music, software and movies were there for the taking! I'd rip my CDs and add them to the Limewire folder. My library took off and music became disposable.

I haven't used Limewire for a few years now. I only use uTorrent and NEVER infringe copyright...ahem...hardly never at all.


On Wednesday, CNET broke the news that U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood granted summary judgment in favor of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), which filed a copyright lawsuit against LimeWire in 2006. In her decision, Wood ruled Lime Group, parent of LimeWire software maker Lime Wire, and founder Mark Gorton committed copyright infringement, induced copyright infringement, and engaged in unfair competition.
Legal experts: LimeWire likely doomed

and....


First, the judge found Gorton, who is also LimeWire's sole director, personally liable for infringement, observing in her ruling that "an individual, including a corporate officer, who has the ability to supervise infringing activity and has a financial interest in that activity, or who personally participates in that activity is personally liable for infringement." That will likely strike fear in the hearts of would-be P2P moguls who may have been clinging to the belief that they could hide behind corporate shells, insulating their own assets if the law ever caught up with them.
Reuters

Although Limewire is only a nostalgic memory, it's demise will be sad. MPAA and RIAA are the 'cat's paws' for the interests looking to control the internet. Most ATSers are probably aware of all this already. The media interests demand more influence about the content of the internet, Govts naturally want more control too.

Media corps want to maintain a control on the markets. Governments want to maintain control on the flow of information. These battles in the name of intellectual property rights are disingenuous. The real war is about freedom of communication.




posted on May, 17 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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Gosh Limewire and me will always have our memories. Music when I was a teen was like a movement. Now I could careless about downloading one song. Many already know there's numerous sites that offer similar downloads like Limewire. I heard Piratebay is in a major legal case. But you can't deny the laws of the countries. It's illegal and when one falls the others would also. Maybe the next generation of computer wiz's out smart the companies that block P2P.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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I say good ridance.

Not that I didn't use Limewire when it was released, just that it's plugged into the Gnutella network, which is how pedophiles get their kiddy porn on the net.

Sickening.

Clients P2P like the piratebay, Utorrent and mininova will always exist, they'll never be able to quell all of those.

Just look at how they tried to kill PirateBay, didn't work at all did it?

I say good bye Limewire and all you pedos who use it for that purpose as well.

~Keeper



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:12 PM
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Boycott the RIAA.

Do not buy any albums from any RIAA member studios.

Write all your favorite bands. Tell them you will not buy any music from them as long as they sign with RIAA member labels.

We need to send these bastards a message.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
I say good ridance.

Not that I didn't use Limewire when it was released, just that it's plugged into the Gnutella network, which is how pedophiles get their kiddy porn on the net.

Sickening.

Clients P2P like the piratebay, Utorrent and mininova will always exist, they'll never be able to quell all of those.

Just look at how they tried to kill PirateBay, didn't work at all did it?

I say good bye Limewire and all you pedos who use it for that purpose as well.

~Keeper


LOL!!!!

I guess you have no clue that the exact same files are shared on Utorrent from sites such as piratebay and mininova? Keep up the crusade against knowledge!



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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Gee, when I was a teen, I washed cars and mowed lawns to earn money to buy the music that I wanted.

As someone who acted quite frequently in my younger days, the exchange was not for currency but for recognition and sometimes freedom to do other things. The times spent on stage prevented me from becoming intimidated when speaking with either pretty girls or even the Vice President of the United States. Sure the experiences gained were far better than the cash that could have been earned, but when your job is part of the entertainment industry, then you should be paid for your work.

Yes, the record labels do have too much control over acts that are signed and far too many robbed musicians. The same was true of the film industry in the early days. Even early stars like Clark Gable did not command the high pay that moderate actors enjoy today.

Yes, there does need to be changes and I for one hate that fronts like iTunes do not allow for independent artists to put forth material to gain profit. Were it not for the legal battles of a paysite's protected technologies (Amazon's 1 Click service is a key example) then I think that a site that would sign limited contracts with independents would be a very viable enterprise and a very attractive alternative. Of course the problem of sharing the purchased song or whatever is a concern. While making a copy for a friend is one thing, turning around and making it free for everyone goes against the artist.

I guess the best example is looking at our own ATS Live Studio. We are restricted to creative commons music and songs that members have submitted for use. But it would also be nice if those artists had a way to be compensated by a self-publish contract that works. And are still free to allow for free use of their music like by ATS Live Studio.

I think sites like hulu and pandora are a step in the right direction (depending on how they do royalties) and may ultimately become a standard for how things are done. But as much as I would like to see Prince videos on youtube or another venue for free, I understand why he viciously protects his material. Especially older songs and live performances. It is lost income. He just happens to be fortunate enough to held his guns when he was signed in order to protect his intellectual property indefinitely.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by Ahabstar
 


I do not disagree with you at all. I do have an issue with things that are not available though. There are old records and videos that I cannot find legitimately anywhere. One movie I have looks like it was showing on a projector and then videotaped. Then the video tape was watched 10000 times before it was converted to digital and uploaded. It is a 'prequel' to "Evil Dead" That Bruce Campbell and Sam Raimi shot over a weekend out in the woods as sort of a treatment before the first film was made. I did not even know this existed until I found it on a filesharing network and if I can buy it, I will.

There are other things that I would be happy to pay for if they would just release them. A few years ago, you could legally download all kinds of old video game roms. You could basically find any game you wanted from at least my childhood. Things not available like arcade games from the '80s, Atari games, crap like that. Then suddenly retro-gaming blew up and the companies went around locking up all the roms. That is fine but they are only selling the ones they think they will make money on.

I am not advocating stealing anything, I am just saying that if a company wants to demand money for its product, then make the product available to me.

This is why I love the torrent networks, that and all the public domain documentaries and out of print hard to find books you can get. I would hate to see my access to these things go away.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


And I can agree to that point to a point. If an item is unavailable by any other means.

And I think that "fair use" does indeed should cover switching mediums. As none of my 12" vinyls will play on an iPod nor have I seen any CD's lately of various older acts, especially obscure ones.

However, the release of newly ripped albums by current artists. There is no excuse for that. And last I checked, not too many films are not released to the home market by DVD. In fact there is a fairly good market of direct to video that bypasses theatrical release.

As for the Evil Dead prequel, might be of interest to contact Sam Rami or Bruce Campbell. I can't speak for Sam, but Bruce is a pretty good guy for talking about all kinds of things. I met him at a convention once that my cousin's business was doing promotion for a different film. Very down to earth guy.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by Ahabstar
 


That is awesome you met Bruce. He seems like a genuinely good guy. I never thought to try and contact either of them I guess because it is only 20 minutes long and of extremely low quality. The production consists of those two and a camera. Pretty much zero money was spent on it and I had read about it after that. From what I gathered it was never meant to be released so whether they like it being out there or not is the question I guess. It was just supposed to get studio execs interested but it was still described as a little story before the story. Then again, when you watch it "Into The Woods" and the first two movies all in a row, it feels like you just saw the same story 3 times with an ever increasing imaginative telling. Who knows. I will see.

I agree about the new and available items. I really do not even want to sound like I am defending the whole trend of distributing copyrighted items underground but...

Did those respective industries go up or down in revenue over this time? I honestly do not know but they seem to be trucking along just fine. Hell, youtube is making new stars with their originally free videos and crap. I also remember when Napster was the only free game in town or the first big one and bands all over the place were praising it because they said it got them recognition that lead to more sales. The people doing the whining were Metallica with their millions and millions and millions of dollars because they could not accept the fact that they betrayed their fan base and lost a lot of listeners by giving up on true heavy metal music and becoming a pop rock band - buy I digress.

Anyway, my whole thing is that google does just as much harm. The internet alone is all it really takes. Kiddy porn was traded online long before P2P was even an idea and I am sure it will be long after. Bootlegging has been around as long as their has been a way to record anything. I would hate to think I could lose all my channels on tv - including the Discovery Channel that I love because someone used another channel to do something bad. Know what I mean?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by K J Gunderson

Originally posted by tothetenthpower
I say good ridance.

Not that I didn't use Limewire when it was released, just that it's plugged into the Gnutella network, which is how pedophiles get their kiddy porn on the net.

Sickening.

Clients P2P like the piratebay, Utorrent and mininova will always exist, they'll never be able to quell all of those.

Just look at how they tried to kill PirateBay, didn't work at all did it?

I say good bye Limewire and all you pedos who use it for that purpose as well.

~Keeper


LOL!!!!

I guess you have no clue that the exact same files are shared on Utorrent from sites such as piratebay and mininova? Keep up the crusade against knowledge!


I wouln't know, I don't make a habit of looking for kiddy porn on the internet.

All I know is websites like PirateBay and Mininova are monitored for content, where as limewire is NOT.

Crusade against knowledge?

That's funny..

~Keeper



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
I wouln't know, I don't make a habit of looking for kiddy porn on the internet.


Memory lapse?


Not that I didn't use Limewire when it was released, just that it's plugged into the Gnutella network, which is how pedophiles get their kiddy porn on the net.



I say good bye Limewire and all you pedos who use it for that purpose as well.


Sounds like you are making quite a claim of knowledge right there and that is exactly what I was responding to. If you know enough to complain about one place they get it, do you not see how silly it is to then turn around and promote other places that use the same networks?




All I know is websites like PirateBay and Mininova are monitored for content, where as limewire is NOT.


Limewire is not a website, it is an application. Utorrent is an application. They all share files found on PB and MN. It seems like you have no idea what you are talking about which would be fine if you did not have such a strong opinion about it.



Crusade against knowledge?

That's funny..

~Keeper



Thanks, so was this response.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


Well it's just Lica now, there is no metal there anymore, but yes the recording labels have had a huge drop in expected sales as well as the mom and pop record stores. Now, it is pretty much up to Wal-Mart and Best Buy to determine what people will listen to by what they stock.

There are many contributing causes to the industry and download piracy is only part of the total picture. Local artists can only get signed if they have either excellent representation (the old friend of a friend likes this act) or by providing the hard numbers for followers. Because the money issue is the focus today. Many acts that could become the next Led Zeppelin or Metallica remain unsigned. Partly by too many companies diluting the pool and partly protectionism of larger acts.

A good example would be between Prince and The Time. The Time was, for all purposes, kicking Prince's butt. Which was fine to a degree as Warner Brothers was reaping the benefit of the competition and Prince had a little residual return as well as it was a side project initially to help his cousin. But when Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis started showing up late to practices and just outright no showing, Prince advised booting them to Morris Day. It ended up killing The Time. But the guys did alright with Flyte Tyme studios, especially with Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation 1814 album, which was her fourth album. This lead to signing quite a few acts like Usher, Sting and few others for songs or whole albums. There is of course more to the story here but doesn't really stick to the thread.

Suffice it to say, there is a real disadvantage to the unsigned independent artist. And as record companies don't see the profits they expect, it just makes it harder on the unsigned to reach their aspirations. Banking on styles, while counter-productive in many regards, is their best guess for marketability.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by Ahabstar
reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


Well it's just Lica now, there is no metal there anymore, but yes the recording labels have had a huge drop in expected sales as well as the mom and pop record stores. Now, it is pretty much up to Wal-Mart and Best Buy to determine what people will listen to by what they stock.


Why do you say that? What about FYE? Did they go out of business? What about all of the legal online outlets for purchasing music? I think you actually just highlighted a big part of the problem. Bestbuy and Walmart seem to think people have no problem paying $17.99 for 8 songs. I have a problem with that. I remember when Napster was new, I went to the mall to get an OLD album on CD. It was not even newly released on cd. It had 9 songs, it was old. They wanted 16 bucks for it at the store. I went home and stole it. Not that that was right but I was there, at the store, ready to PAY for it. I had a price in mind because I had been buying music for plenty long enough that I knew what I thought it should have been worth. I find it hard to understand how the production costs could have gone up for an already produced CD but they did. My point is, I know I was not and am not alone in having that reaction. Perhaps if the prices were more reflective of the value, more people would not be seeking out ways to get it for free. I am willing to bet that if the choice went from between free and rip off to free, rip off, and fair price - theft would go down.


There are many contributing causes to the industry and download piracy is only part of the total picture. Local artists can only get signed if they have either excellent representation (the old friend of a friend likes this act) or by providing the hard numbers for followers. Because the money issue is the focus today. Many acts that could become the next Led Zeppelin or Metallica remain unsigned. Partly by too many companies diluting the pool and partly protectionism of larger acts.


That is not piracy causing any problems. That is the industry causing problems that lead to piracy. Cannot get heard but like to play - put your stuff out for free download on P2P networks. People do it all the time and gain followings. People stealing because prices are too high? That is because, like you said, it is all too corporate. I think you have your cause and effect reversed. Then again, that is just what I think.


A good example would be between Prince and The Time. The Time was, for all purposes, kicking Prince's butt. Which was fine to a degree as Warner Brothers was reaping the benefit of the competition and Prince had a little residual return as well as it was a side project initially to help his cousin. But when Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis started showing up late to practices and just outright no showing, Prince advised booting them to Morris Day. It ended up killing The Time. But the guys did alright with Flyte Tyme studios, especially with Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation 1814 album, which was her fourth album. This lead to signing quite a few acts like Usher, Sting and few others for songs or whole albums. There is of course more to the story here but doesn't really stick to the thread.

Suffice it to say, there is a real disadvantage to the unsigned independent artist. And as record companies don't see the profits they expect, it just makes it harder on the unsigned to reach their aspirations. Banking on styles, while counter-productive in many regards, is their best guess for marketability.



That is interesting but I am not sure what it says about killing off P2P applications. I see what you mean about the money but I still think it says more about the corrupt nature of the industry than it does about limewire.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by K J Gunderson]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 05:46 PM
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blame the crowbar for the burglary
the bike for being drunk and falling
the boat for not catching fish
the tackle for the for the weather
bonnfire for tomorrows sunshine

how these people even became engaged in justice system beats me,



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


The big problem that I have with CDs is that most times, you have one or two good songs, and the rest is garbage. So essentially your paying 16 bucks for 2 songs. The music insdustry stopped being about quality and more about quantity, and don't allow musicians to be musicians anymore.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


I happen to read, and know of the Gnutella network from fiascos in the early 90's with pedo rings and such.

I know that Utorrent is a program, much like Limewire, and I understand they share content as do websites like Mininova and Piratebay.

My point was that it's far less acessible on these websites than it is on programs like limewire and sharebear and those other ones.

There's no search function on Utorrent as far as I know, not like BitTorrent...

My point was about accesability.

~Keeper



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 06:07 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by K J Gunderson
 


The big problem that I have with CDs is that most times, you have one or two good songs, and the rest is garbage. So essentially your paying 16 bucks for 2 songs. The music insdustry stopped being about quality and more about quantity, and don't allow musicians to be musicians anymore.


That is another good point. That is why I really like the idea of paying per song. Of the bands I really love, there is still always at least one song I would not buy if I had the choice. I forgot about that.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


"torrent" is just a protocol

google is the prefered torrent search engien id asume (dont know which search engien is the most used atm) ,

either way

you can blame the protocol for doing whats its scripted to do ,

the search engien for showing you where to find the torrent you so long for not to mention all thouse servers the information has to go throu to reach you, in worst cases there can be hundres of not thousend servers the information comes throu,

or blame the party who uploaded it in the first place ,



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 06:14 PM
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Good ****ing riddance


I've cleaned one too many computers of viruses whose moronic owners contracted by using networks like Limewire/Frostwire to get their pirated material. The idea that this festering pustule of crapware is doomed has brightened up my day significantly.

Anybody still using these kinds of networks is living in the stone age, decentralized p2p like Bittorrent is vastly superior in every way possible. 3+ years of torrent usage and not virus 1 yet (and I don't run AV because I don't click stupid links).



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 06:38 PM
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A guy should shy away from piratebay. They were recently bought by an outfit who's intent remains to be seen. Demonoid is much better.

I never used limewire, my kids did. I used Gnutella until I saw some inherent weaknesses in security. EMule is still kicking around for some interesting files as well as soulseek. ALL of these are endangered species now.

What troubles me is the judge threw out tradition case law in corporate protection and went after the individual which is self defeating for legal protection and corporate law. You could use this same argument and go after each stockholder of BP for the oil leak instead of just suing the corporation. See the problem....

This may be tossed on appeal but the damage has been done.



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