It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Did You See The U Shaped Moon Last Night? Amazing Pics!

page: 2
19
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:08 PM
link   
reply to post by discl0sur3
 

That is quite bizarre looking IMO. I have never seen the crescent of the moon at 6 o'clock position before. I have looked at various sites of moon positions/cycles and there is nothing like this anywhere. I cannot find any explanation for this positioning. We need some folks to come on here and post an explanation for this or some links to educate us non-astronomers on moon cycles and positioning.
Definitely a cool picture though.




posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:11 PM
link   


EDIT: Although I believe this graphic accurately shows the differences between how the moon looks at different latitudes, it isn't applicable here because apparently the OP's photos where taken in the northern hemisphere, and not near the equator.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Tearman
 


So you will have actual photos to support this then?




posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Tearman
 


Thank you. that explains it for me, plus I have seen a few more photos on various sites of this. Nothing abnormal here.

www.flickr.com...



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tearman


Great find...just one question though. Does it make a difference which hemisphere you are viewing this from or does everyone see the same thing?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by discl0sur3

Originally posted by Tearman


Great find...just one question though. Does it make a difference which hemisphere you are viewing this from or does everyone see the same thing?


What? I thought the graphic was fairly self-explanatory. The three pictures of the moon at the bottom of the graphic show how the view of the moon is different from different latitudes on the earth. Areas north of the equator, areas near the equator, and areas south of the equator.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Tearman
 


How? How does that make sense? To me it doesnt, i must be way off here?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tearman

Originally posted by discl0sur3

Originally posted by Tearman


Great find...just one question though. Does it make a difference which hemisphere you are viewing this from or does everyone see the same thing?


What? I thought the graphic was fairly self-explanatory.

Now, now...no need to get smart. I was asking an honest question as your diagram doesn't add up. I live in the Northern Hemisphere...see below


"The pictures are shown from a northern hemisphere perspective. Those of us who live in the northern hemisphere (outside the tropics) have to look generally south to see the Moon when it's highest in the sky, and we see the right-hand side illuminated at first quarter phase, for example. People who live in temperate or high latitudes south of the equator must look toward the north; to them the first quarter moon has its left side illuminated."


[edit on 17-5-2010 by discl0sur3]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:28 PM
link   
The view here from Louisiana was similar to that depicted here at this link -
www.skyandtelescope.com...

However, the crescent did seem to be slightly closer to the six o clock center, which I don't ever remember seeing in that position.

My ten year old son remarked about it as I was closing up the grill about dark...theorized that it was the light reflected from Venus causing the strange crescent position.

I was impressed that he knew which planet it was, anyway!


It was indeed a pretty sight, and unusual, even to my sky-watching eyes. Thanks for the pics and post, OP!



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:31 PM
link   
reply to post by jazz10
 


I'm not sure if you're being serious or not. You know the earth is round, right? At the equator, you are standing at an angle 90 degrees different from how you'd be oriented at the north pole. Or is there something I'm not understanding about what's going on here?

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]

EDIT: NEVERMIND, I made a mistake.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by jazz10
reply to post by Tearman
 


How? How does that make sense? To me it doesnt, i must be way off here?


My thoughts exactly, according to what I've been able to dig up so far we shouldn't be able to see the crescent in that position from the Northern Hemisphere



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:34 PM
link   
Oh, okay.... so the picture was taken from somewhere far north then? Okay, I've been a serious dummy here. The picture was obviously taken when the moon was about to set... as is evident in the picture, the moon is seen near the horizon. I was assuming the picture was taken while the moon was near its highest point in the sky.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:38 PM
link   
Well i can safely say "Im lost off here" because i have never seen the moon with a noth or south crescent. So im gonna keep quiet from now on.

Oh and to the question regarding the earth been round? Youre kidding right?

Round



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tearman
Oh, okay.... so the picture was taken from somewhere far north then?


If you consider Alberta far North then I guess so.
Why is it that so many others on this thread concur with the fact that they've never witnessed this phenomenon before if it's a common occurrence?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:38 PM
link   
I have seen it before, because I remember it being called the horns of Isis.

I made a mental note of that. It's pretty, when it happens.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tearman
Oh, okay.... so the picture was taken from somewhere far north then? Okay, I've been a serious dummy here. The picture was obviously taken when the moon was about to set... as is evident in the picture, the moon is seen near the horizon.

[edit on 17-5-2010 by Tearman]


Are you suggesting that the crescent changes position as the moon sets?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:40 PM
link   
reply to post by Tearman
 





What? I thought the graphic was fairly self-explanatory. The three pictures of the moon at the bottom of the graphic show how the view of the moon is different from different latitudes on the earth. Areas north of the equator, areas near the equator, and areas south of the equator.


If it's self explanatory, why are pics showing up from the Northern hemisphere, that feature the moon the way it's supposed to look from the equator, according to the diagram you posted?



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:44 PM
link   



Here is a map
The moon is inclined
5.145° to the ecliptic of Earth's orbit
and between 18.29° and 28.58° to Earth's equator.

So sometimes, yes, we will see it "as though" at the equator.


David Grouchy



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:48 PM
link   
The Moon does not orbit directly over the equator. Depending on the time of year, this appearance presents itself at different latitudes.



posted on May, 17 2010 @ 03:49 PM
link   
Try the Procession of the Equinox. The Ecliptic is directly overhead at the Equator, hence the crescent illustrated. In Summer the Ecliptic is ( in the Northern Hemisphere ), higher from the horizon. We are about a month from the Summer Solstice, hence the moon appears "higher" in the sky, closer to what it would at the Equator.



new topics

top topics



 
19
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join