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Largest Science Experiment Ever!

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posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:43 AM
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Kia Ora or Hello everyone,

This is my first thread on ATS so I apoligize in advance if I have done something wrong. By the way, did a quick search on ATS, and nothing relating to my what I'm about to show you popped up, so hear ya go.

The Largest Science Experiment in Human History


CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is currently the biggest science experiment in operation, but it may have to pass that mantle on soon enough. A collaboration between NASA and the ESA plans to launch three spacecraft into orbit around the sun 3 million miles apart, then have them shoot lasers at each other, all in the name of proving the existence of gravitational waves, the last piece of Einstein’s relativity theory that is as yet unproved.


Largest Science Experiment Ever

Wow! check that out, pretty impressive right?
It's gonna be interesting to see how much this is going to cost to put all this together. But if its in the name of science, it gotta be worth it.

So whats everyone else's take on this?




posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:46 AM
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That IS impressive!


GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO SCIENCE!



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:58 AM
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Albeit I didn't look hard, kinda busy.

But when is this suppose to start? and end?



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 05:02 AM
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Originally posted by Republican08
But when is this suppose to start? and end?


Umm the official estimated time of launch is sometime in 2020, so we won't be seeing any breakthrough's yet.

Not to sure on when it is supposed to end. I'd have to say about 5-10 years after the launch.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 05:56 AM
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reply to post by Jordan_The_Maori
 


Can't wait till 2020, it will be great to see what happens, what the results will be. But I might die by then, therefore in conclusion, today is Saturday, go get drunk again


By the way, nice to see another NZ..have a good Saturday night ^^

[edit on 15-5-2010 by oozyism]



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by Jordan_The_Maori
 


I don't think they'll find Einsteins magic gravity waves. All previous and very costly attempts thus far has failed. So their solution is to spend even more? They need to realize that gravity is not akin to a rubber sheet and a bowling ball as Einstein describes it, how much money do they need to spend on frivolous experiments to realize they aren't going to find anything?



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


More interesting things will happen between now and 2020 so its all good. I'm more interested as to what will happen on the infamous 21/12/2012
Either the world will turn upside down (figure of speech) or everything will be fine and dandy. Either way, I'm going to laugh my ass off.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 06:19 AM
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Kia ora,

It's a dang big distance to be shooting pretty much perfectly straight beams, I can only marvel at the positioning technology employed in the craft.

Welcome aboard.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by sirnex
 


The only way science has been able to prove anything, is by trying. If they didn't try and experiment, we would not be as advance as we are today.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by Jordan_The_Maori
reply to post by sirnex
 


The only way science has been able to prove anything, is by trying. If they didn't try and experiment, we would not be as advance as we are today.


The thing is, we've been trying and we've tried different ways to detect these mythological gravity waves. Knowing what the effects of gravity are is entirely different than being able to describe what it is. We know it's effects, but we're poking at the dark continuously under one assumption of *what* it is. There are other possibilities, so why aren't they testing those out instead of yet *another* test that will most certainly fail as well?

Case in point, how many times are we going to attempt to find these elusive waves that technically should be easy to find and how much more money is going to be wasted on it? When does one realize that one explanation isn't the right explanation?



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by Jordan_The_Maori
 


yeah it is interesting.

i like how they say cubes of gold, cubes=future



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 09:18 AM
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sometimes even geniuses are wrong
but then again who really knows until you try it out



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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Very cool indeed.

Only the technology to make this happen is impressive.


I was told science does not proof anything. It just eliminates the possibilities.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by Jordan_The_Maori
Kia Ora or Hello everyone,

This is my first thread on ATS so I apoligize in advance if I have done something wrong. By the way, did a quick search on ATS, and nothing relating to my what I'm about to show you popped up, so hear ya go.


The same topic was posted less than 48 hours ago here, but sometimes the search function doesn't work all that well. Fewer search terms seems to work better, up to a point.

But you can notify a mod this is a duplicate thread now that you know so they can close it and refer to the original thread here:

posted on 13-5-2010 @ 12:46 PM
Largest scientific instrument ever built to prove Einstein's theory of general relativity



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