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GM Confirms Lithium-Air Battery Research to Revolutionize EV

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posted on May, 14 2010 @ 10:17 PM
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Well, I always said "The EV will never make it unless they can get batteries that can go at least 300 miles per charge..." look what is coming in the near future!



...Lithium Air batteries could represent an increase of capacity of more 10 times that now achieved by existing lithium-ion cells. This could lead to EVs with ranges in excess of 400 miles per charge--more than many subcompact cars can achieve on a tank of gasoline. www.allcarselectric.com...


discuss..




posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by Just Wondering
 


Cool story.

We've needed a breakthrough in battery technology for decades.

Maybe someday this will be it, but it's a ways off.

The article says the 2011 Volt has a range of 40 miles before the gasoline engine kicks in, not too impressive.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:56 AM
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I think hydrogen fuel cells are where its at, batteries are too wasteful and inefficient and ethanol isn't catching on anytime soon.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by moshpup
 


Are you referring to this? If so, I agree. It certainly seems more efficient than Ethanol, which is lower in octane than gasoline. Also, the biofuels it produces would be a good fuel alternative. Perhaps it would lead to a new sort of hybrid fuel vehicle?

www.technologyreview.com...



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by warpcrafter
 


Wow, i haven't seen that before, pretty interesting stuff. Is there anything algae can't do?



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:22 AM
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Are you gonna trust the same GM who killed the ev1? Yea, they'll be doing research.., research on how to kill it and bury it. Electric cars don't suck down gas and make record profits, they can be charged by free solar energy. Unless they can sell you the fuel it's not gonna happen, and they will do everything in their power to destroy it.

2007..


This is how it should be done..




posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Freezer
 


That would mean there is A LOT of wasted money going to people "researching alternative fuels". Where is the money really going?



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by moshpup
I think hydrogen fuel cells are where its at, batteries are too wasteful and inefficient and ethanol isn't catching on anytime soon.


Your right they certainly are.

Although not so much when they go boom...cause they go BOOM really big...

Can you imagine a winter pile up in DC and one of those goes off?

~Keeper



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


Yeah that could be a problem O_O lol they sure as hell need a safe way to contain the hydrogen.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower

Originally posted by moshpup
I think hydrogen fuel cells are where its at, batteries are too wasteful and inefficient and ethanol isn't catching on anytime soon.


Your right they certainly are.

Although not so much when they go boom...cause they go BOOM really big...

Can you imagine a winter pile up in DC and one of those goes off?

~Keeper




Hydrogen, as a fuel, is actually Safer than gasoline.


Hydrogen is a gas at standard room temperature. Additionally, hydrogen in its gaseous form, is lighter than air. Gasoline, in both liquid and gaseous (ie.: vaporized) form is heavier than air.


What does this have to do with the relative safety of the two materials?


Just this, if hydrogen should be accidentally released into the environment, say as the result of a collision rupturing its containment vessel, it immediately converts into a lighter than air gas and begins to rise up and disburse away from the accident site!

Any accidental ignition of the gas is likely to occur safely above the heads of anyone "on site".


Gasoline (flammable in both its liquid, and even morso, in its vaporous state) on the other hand, is a liquid at room temperature and is heavier than air, even in its vapor form. Released from containment, gasoline will seek the lowest available point whether as a liquid or as a vapor.

Accidental ignition of gasoline would therefore result in an inferno at exactly the same level injured and immobile victims are most likely to be trapped!



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Bhadhidar
 


Your right,

However this is not the same Hydrogen, this would be a fuel cell, meaning it would have to be in some solid state.

Which makes it EXTREMELY volatile..

~Keeper



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Maybe someday this will be it, but it's a ways off.

The article says the 2011 Volt has a range of 40 miles before the gasoline engine kicks in, not too impressive.



Yeah, it's not a great range, but when the new batteries come online, it will be a relatively easy swap out. I think a TON of people would buy a 300-400 mile per charge electric vehicle.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:16 PM
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If the spark is created when something punctures the fuel cell, its basically a compressed bomb. Like when an acetylene tank explodes.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by Freezer
Are you gonna trust the same GM who killed the ev1? Yea, they'll be doing research.., research on how to kill it and bury it. Electric cars don't suck down gas and make record profits, they can be charged by free solar energy. Unless they can sell you the fuel it's not gonna happen, and they will do everything in their power to destroy it.


I don't want to defend GM too much since I think they're mismanaged, but what are you talking about GM selling fuel? I thought GM was in the business of selling cars, and the oil companies were in the business of selling fuel?

The ev1 wasn't economical, it cost way too much for the broader consumer market to afford. As oil prices go up and battery prices come down, electrics or hybrid electrics will become more competitive.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by moshpup
reply to post by Freezer
 


That would mean there is A LOT of wasted money going to people "researching alternative fuels". Where is the money really going?


Just as Ralph Ring once quoted his superior, "We're not necessarily interested in finding the answers, we're interesting in looking for them..."

This creates jobs, and keeps the money rolling in...


Originally posted by Arbitrageur
I don't want to defend GM too much since I think they're mismanaged, but what are you talking about GM selling fuel? I thought GM was in the business of selling cars, and the oil companies were in the business of selling fuel?


While I don't have documented proof, I would bet my life that the oil cartel, and the automotive companies like gm are in business together.


Originally posted by Arbitrageur
The ev1 wasn't economical, it cost way too much for the broader consumer market to afford. As oil prices go up and battery prices come down, electrics or hybrid electrics will become more competitive.


From Wiki -
"Leasing rates for the EV1 ranged from $399 to $549 a month."

While the suggested retail price was quoted as $34,000, you were not allowed to purchase one, for obvious reasons of course...Drop in your own nickel-metal hydride cells and you are set.

Not having to pay for gas again made it pretty dam economical in my book. Why did the owners protest the return of their, I mean GM's ev1's?

I think you should watch the video, "Who Killed The Electric Car"
This will tell you the real story of what happened.

Unfortunately the google video is dead, go figure.


[edit on 15-5-2010 by Freezer]



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