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Could we be Pumping the Earth's own Cooling system?

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posted on Jun, 7 2004 @ 02:11 PM
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Is it possible that the oil beneath the Earth is supposed to be there to keep the Earth from overheating? Is it possible that the oil also acts as a buffer between the core and surface, sort of "shock absorber" for the surface?

I thought of this the other day and wanted to see some discussion on the topic.









posted on Jun, 7 2004 @ 02:17 PM
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its possible but...in order for it to actually have any cooling benefits it has to have a way of getting to a cooler part of the earth and then recirculate back into the warmer parts of the earth. we dont know if thats happening or not. it is possible as there is oil all over the planet and the theory falls along the design of an engine. oil is not just used as a lubricant but it also wicks away heat from vital engine parts. it acts as a cushion between ebarings and the crank for example and takes heat away from high friction areas.

but also let be noted that there are theories that the oil is being renewed. i havent looked into this a great deal but i have heard of this. i dont know if it true but if it is we arent making that much of an impact i'd say. (this is not a thread about oil depleting or renewing so dont go there just yet)

so in theory yes you could be right.



posted on Jun, 7 2004 @ 02:21 PM
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What is the average temperature of oil when it is brought to the surface versus where the pump shaft is at? If it warms as it nears the surface I'd be inclined to reason that oil is not providing a cooling function. However, if it cools as it nears the surface then I'd say maybe there's something to your theory.



posted on Jun, 7 2004 @ 02:45 PM
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Well Oil forms when Organic Shell is buried and when the temp rises to between 75 and 150 degrees Celcius keregon is first formed and that in turn forms oil. Between 150 and 225 the molecules in the Shale crack to form Natural Gas and above 225 all that is left is graphite.

So I don't know if it maintains that temp but to form it it has to be atleast 167 degrees fareinheit to form.



posted on Jun, 7 2004 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Is it possible that the oil beneath the Earth is supposed to be there to keep the Earth from overheating? Is it possible that the oil also acts as a buffer between the core and surface, sort of "shock absorber" for the surface?

In a word, 'no.'

There isn't a thick layer of oil around the interior of the planet -- otherwise, we could put a well down anywhere and pump all the oil we'd like to have out of it. No well would ever go dry, because the amount of oil needed to buffer heat and shock would be ... well... at least enough to fill all the oceans on the surface.

Furthermore, no volcano could get through a thick layer of oil without starting it burning, y'know? And at every deep earthquake, we'd see oil popping out of the ground by the barrelsfull.



posted on Apr, 10 2007 @ 11:02 AM
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Global warming is real.

While many bodies in the solar system are heating, certain greenhouse gases such as CO2 trap heat within the atmosphere which accelerate the process.

Its been lectured about at the university I went to for years. Much differently than you would see on the news or many media outlets, including some 'scientific' ones.

Enough about this though, I'm sick of telling people something they don't want to hear.



posted on Apr, 10 2007 @ 11:24 AM
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isn't the oil thats pumped out replaced by something?

its not like theres huge caverns of vacuum down there in the depleated oil fields.

so if the drillers pump water/steam to push oil to the well head
then theres still a 'coolant' present when the oil is removed.

so even if sea water is not as efficient in storing warmth as petroleum -
but if its even 80% as efficient, it would still take a great deal of
earths natural coolant/ pools of insulation to be removed...

to allow the earth's crust dynamics to be radically altered, i.e. heat up

any mathematicans or number crunchers ready with their equasions?



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 11:40 AM
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I always thought Oil wells were under pressure thats how they are able to pump oil to the surface.
wouldn't pumping something back into the earth define the purpose of getting oil, cause you would be using more energy, than you was getting out of the oil.

anyways just my thoughts on the oil rig process.
i haven't really looked it up, maybe i should when i have more time..
Laters



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 11:45 AM
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Very interesting theory. I've never thought of it before.
Good fodder for discussion!



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by St Udio
its not like theres huge caverns of vacuum down there in the depleated oil fields.


I'd imagine that they would just collapse in on themselves or be filled with water once the drilling apparatus is removed.

[edit on 12-4-2007 by Zanzibar]



posted on Mar, 14 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Is it possible that the oil beneath the Earth is supposed to be there to keep the Earth from overheating? Is it possible that the oil also acts as a buffer between the core and surface, sort of "shock absorber" for the surface?

I thought of this the other day and wanted to see some discussion on the topic.



This is very interesting. Especially with all the natural/man made disasters in the media today.
It would at least have to contribute to some kind of mega change. If it is related to hot/cold would be worth pursuing. It would almost be impossible for it not to have some effect. I know a little about drilling. I have been a guest aboard a jack-up rig in the Mississippi Sound.
They were drilling a 5/8"pilot hole under a barrier island into the Gulf of Mexico that would be progressively expanded to allow a 24" diameter pipe to be pulled through it. This would connect the drilling rig several miles off shore to a refinery on the mainland. This was a small island so drilling oil and gas was a grocery store and bar room topic, spoken of often. Maybe I can ferret some inside thoughts on your OP from some of the friends I made on the island. Interesting. S+F



posted on Mar, 14 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


IDk, according to this thread Earth maybe making new oil...

www.abovetopsecret.com...







 
fixed link

[edit on Sun Mar 14 2010 by Jbird]



posted on Mar, 14 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by Optix
reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


IDk, according to this thread Earth maybe making new oil...

www.abovetopsecret.com...&flagit=551670


Good find.
I pulled this tid bit up from your link --and the race is on----

Published Oct 6 2004 by Alternative Press Review, Archived Oct 6 2004

The “Abiotic Oil” Controversy
by Richard Heinberg

More to the point, Gold also claimed the existence of liquid hydrocarbons—oil—at great depths. But there is a problem with this: the temperatures at depths below about 15,000 feet are high enough (above 275 degrees F) to break hydrocarbon bonds. What remains after these molecular bonds are severed is methane, whose molecule contains only a single carbon atom. For petroleum geologists this is not just a matter of theory, but of repeated and sometimes costly experience: they speak of an oil “window” that exists from roughly 7,500 feet to 15,000 feet, within which temperatures are appropriate for oil formation; look far outside the window, and you will most likely come up with a dry hole or, at best, natural gas only. The rare exceptions serve to prove the rule: they are invariably associated with strata that are rapidly (in geological terms) migrating upward or downward. (4)


We have a temperature and a depth for starters. Next search will be for temperature of extracted oil

(added ex quote tags)

[edit on Sun Mar 14 2010 by Jbird]



posted on Mar, 14 2010 @ 03:19 PM
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As I have said earlier I know a little about the drilling,

Just these few links tell me I know not much about the zones or temperatures,

There is certainly a lot to learn.

This first link seems to conflict quite a bit from the "window" in the post above.

One thing for sure is that oil is hotter in the interior than the surface air.

So if you extract it and it cools at the surface it is warming the atmosphere in IMO.



Five Miles Deep: Pumping Oil from the Bottom of the Gulf

Aug 21, 2007 ... Pumped Up: Chevron Drills Down 30000 Feet to Tap Oil-Rich Gulf .... The living quarters, which house up to 150 workers, are the size ... Dropping a drill down through more than 1 mile of water and 4 miles of earth isn't easy either. ... At 30000 feet, it can reach more than 400 degrees Fahrenheit, ...

www.wired.com...

It's just another high-priced mishap in the world of ultradeep-sea drilling — the newest, riskiest, and most technologically extreme drilling frontier. Today, deep-sea rigs are capable of reaching down 40,000 feet, twice as deep as a decade ago: plunging their drills through 10,000 feet of water and then 30,000 more feet of seabed. One platform sits atop each so-called field, thrusting its tentacles into multiple wells dug into ancient sediment, slurping out oil, and then pumping it back to onshore refineries through underwater pipelines.



stored in a fluid produced during heavy oil extraction

Inventors: Alexandre A. Borissov Anatoly A. Borissov
Agents: DOWELL & DOWELL P.C.
Assignees:
Origin: ALEXANDRIA, VA US
IPC8 Class: AF03G706FI
USPC Class: 606412
Patent application number: 20090301087

----------------------------------------------------------------------




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Abstract:

A system and method is disclosed for generating power from thermal energy stored in a fluid extracted during the recovery of heavy oil. The method includes the steps of vaporizing a working fluid in a binary cycle using thermal energy stored in the extracted fluid, converting the vaporized working fluid total energy into mechanical power using a positive displacement expander, and condensing the vaporized working fluid back to a liquid phase.

Claims:

1. A method for generating power from thermal energy stored in a fluid extracted during the recovery of heavy oil comprising the steps of
a) vaporizing a working fluid in a closed binary cycle using thermal energy stored in the extracted fluid;(b) converting said vaporized working fluid total energy into mechanical power using a positive displacement expander; and(c) condensing said vaporized working fluid back to a liquid phase.


 
(fixed link)
Mod Note: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.



[edit on Sun Mar 14 2010 by Jbird]



posted on Mar, 15 2010 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Is it possible that the oil beneath the Earth is supposed to be there to keep the Earth from overheating? Is it possible that the oil also acts as a buffer between the core and surface, sort of "shock absorber" for the surface?

In a word, 'no.'

There isn't a thick layer of oil around the interior of the planet -- otherwise, we could put a well down anywhere and pump all the oil we'd like to have out of it. No well would ever go dry, because the amount of oil needed to buffer heat and shock would be ... well... at least enough to fill all the oceans on the surface.

Furthermore, no volcano could get through a thick layer of oil without starting it burning, y'know? And at every deep earthquake, we'd see oil popping out of the ground by the barrelsfull.


When equating the Earth to an engine. You can drill a hole anywhere you want to on an engine block, but you will not always run into coolent. One does not need an entire layer of oil/coolent to properly control the temperature of an engine. In fact, there is not a combustion engine on the planet that impliments this type of cooling.

However, I do agree with you that the amount of oil required to "cool the earth" would be incredibly large. However, for the process to properly work, the oil would have to circulate from an area of higher temperature to an area of lower temperature.

Visualize a large oil deposit, itself a few miles deep, located under the ocean. Oil at the bottom of the well would naturally heat up due to its proximity to the upper mantle (pretty hot layer of the earth, where magma lives). Okay, so this oil heats up by conduction and naturally rises to the top of the deposit, where its proximity to the ocean ( a much lower temperature) causes it to decrease in temperature again by conduction and therefore sink back to the bottom of the deposit where the cycle repeats. The heated sea floor then transfers its heat to the seawater by convection and conduction, which Thus effectively transfers heat from the upper mantle to the sea water. The heated water then rises to the surface, where it is transfered to the are by convection, and eventually lost to space. Essentually cooling off by transfering heat from the mantle all the way space, where it can be lost to the void.


Great thread, it is possible.



posted on Mar, 17 2010 @ 01:31 PM
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For your theory to be confirmed, The only data that would need to be collected would be temperature readings and whether or not there is current in the oil deposit.

The difference in temperatures would cause current (from the rise and fall of hot and cold oil) Also, the temperature would be somewhat erratic.

Chances are, this is probably already the case, but the real question is how important is it to cooling the earth?


Originally posted by Zanzibar

Originally posted by St Udio
its not like theres huge caverns of vacuum down there in the depleated oil fields.


I'd imagine that they would just collapse in on themselves or be filled with water once the drilling apparatus is removed.

[edit on 12-4-2007 by Zanzibar]


Oh, and you are correct, the emptied deposits are filled in, usually with sea water (depends on where you drill though) I mean, where the hell are you gonna get seawater in Northern Texas?

[edit on 17-3-2010 by LeeTheDestroyer]



posted on Nov, 5 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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Wow..

This is so weird.. I was just hit up with a similar theory the other day..

Coincidence.. (of course I dont believe in such).



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