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Can You Do This With Your Tap Water?

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posted on May, 14 2010 @ 02:08 AM
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Amazing short clip, I've never seen anything like it.



Is this real or some kind of hoax? Since this is something I've never seen on ATS I thought it was worth posting. (searched and found nothing)

If this is real then its unacceptable, this has got to be dangerous for the people who deal with this problem, I imagine they risk an explosion every time they run the shower.

Not to mention the kind of health problems this could induce.





[edit on 5/14/2010 by Alaskan Man]




posted on May, 14 2010 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by Alaskan Man
 


i am guessing its a joke at earths expense here

erm i did find this on facebook though

www.facebook.com...




WATER UNDER ATTACK! gaslandthemovie.com for info! Category: Entertainment & Arts - Movies Description: A new form of Gas Drilling known as Hydraulic Fracturing has been sweeping across the nation, and is now taking place in 32 states. The Halliburton-invented drilling method consumes and pollutes an enormous amount of water. The majority of the drilling occurs near large rivers and other watershed areas. From Texas to Utah from Wyoming to Louisiana, from West Virginia to Pennsylvania, the entire Nation's water supply is at being rendered undrinkable and unsafe. No joke. WATERUNDERATTACK.com is a website that features clips from Josh Fox/International WOW's new documentay on Gas Drilling, focusing on the Nation's growing water crisis as a result of the drilling boom. It also features recent news on Gas Drilling, petitions and links. WATCH CLIPS NOW at: www.waterunderattack.com... (read less) A new form of Gas Drilling known as Hydraulic Fracturing has been sweeping across the nation, and is now taking place in 32 states. The Halliburton-invented drilling method consumes and pollutes an enormous amount of water. The majority of the drilling occurs near large rivers and other watershed areas. From Texas to Utah from Wyoming to Louisiana, from West Virginia to Pennsylvania, the entire Nation's water supply is at being rendered undrinkable and unsafe. No... (read more) Privacy Type: Open: All content is public.


[edit on 14-5-2010 by jumpingbeanz]



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 02:19 AM
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This is 100% real unfortunately.
ARTICLE

Lighting water on fire sounds like a magic trick, but for some Fort Lupton residents who can perform it in their own kitchen sink, it’s not very entertaining.

Amee Ellsworth and her husband have spent the past five months hoping that their water, which is contaminated with natural gas, does not cause their home to explode. After learning of the Ellsworths’ bizarre concern, at least one more person living near Fort Lupton has discovered her home may be in the same situation.

After learning about the Ellsworths’ water, Renee McClure, who lives with her family about half a mile from Ellsworth, took a flame to her faucet. The water ignited.

“My kids have been drinking that water,” McClure said.

She said her family and their livestock consume 200 gallons of water a day.

Water tests conducted last October confirmed the Ellsworths’ water well was being contaminated by natural gas, Amee Ellsworth said. Flames as high as three feet ignite when she holds a cigarette lighter next to water flowing from her faucet.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission performed the October tests on the Ellsworths’ water. Dave Neslin, acting director for the commission, said tests indicate the water is contaminated from a natural gas well, but the source has not been confirmed. Eight natural gas wells are located in the area surrounding the Ellsworths’ country home.

McClure said she was



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 02:54 AM
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Okay. That just freaked me right the hell out. Wonder what the risks are with an RO system.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:05 AM
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OMG

there goes that Haliburton name again !!!

Are we sure that Haliburton's name doesn't
mean Satan in some other obscure language
like latin or something.

Great!!! now u too can have a Gulf Rig
Explosion in your very own home
courtesy of Haliburton !!!!

why don't somebody shut these people down???



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:14 AM
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Dmn now I need to quit smoking when taking a shower.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:20 AM
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Florida water comes out smelling like pool water. the water hitting the sink vaporizes the clorine I guess. Breathing that can't be good.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by Pharyax
Florida water comes out smelling like pool water. the water hitting the sink vaporizes the clorine I guess. Breathing that can't be good.


I was reading an article on watering indoor plants recently. It was not specific to any area but was published in the US. It had a small paragraph about how you should fill your water pot and let it sit overnight so the chlorine will evaporate because it is bad for the plants. I guess it is ok to tell our kids to get a glass of water to drink but not our plants?

On the OP:

I do not believe there is any natural gas drilling in my area but I am not sure. Either way, I was at the sink with a lighter so I went for it. Now the flint in my lighter is wet and will not light for me but no big sink flames.

Are there any other sources or people that want to confirm this? I am not saying I do not believe stuff like this happens but this is crazy so it would be interesting to see more on it.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 04:56 AM
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I don't know about this, but I can give an overview of gas drilling.
I have been hauling natural gas drilling fluids for four years in North Texas.

Briefly, the gas deposit resides in a strata of shale, usually about
a mile down and usually a thin layer (300ft or less). Once the hole is drilled,
fracturing of the shale is next. To do this, water is pumped down the hole at
extremely high pressure to crack the shale. This water is infused with fine
sand which mostly remains in the shale and acts to hold open the
fractures and allow the gas and water to come back up.

The water comes from any available permitted source depending upon the
areas resources. This includes rivers, creeks, stock ponds, water wells
drilled specifically for the purpose, city water from treatment plants, or
directly from fire-plugs, wash-out water from concrete companies and etc.
all of these sources are compensated for the water. I've seen broke
farmers and ranchers gain handsomely from supplying water to
drilling companies.

Once the water is pumped down (usually about 100 to 300 trucks--a million
gallons or so) the well is opened and gas and waste water comes up.
This waste water is heavy with salt and chlorides and must be disposed
of safely so it doesn't affect the water supply...so what do we do with it?
We drill another well, this time 2 miles down or so (the railroad
commission decides how deep is safe) and pump the water down the
disposal hole at extremely high pressure.

I can tell you that some disposals have been operating years, 5 10, 15
and longer, and some of them take up to a millions gallons a day
a peak times of drilling.

My green friends jib me for being a polluter, but in this area, there have
been no complaints of drilling activities affecting the watershed or
drinking water.

This gas in this man's water supply was caused by a fractured casing
somewhere near his watershed and the RRC should shut down all wells
in the area until the leak is found....else....BOOM



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 06:35 AM
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Ok, not to throw this in another arena, but what does the railroad commission have to do with natural gas drilling? And why answer to them? (As simplistic thought suggests, railroad ties and rails are mostly above ground)

But back to topic, its basically a natural gas contaminating the water table issue still....and HB has their claws in something else....:facepalm:

[edit on 14-5-2010 by ahmonrarh]



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 06:57 AM
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I knew a family that lived near Lock Haven, PA in the early 1970's. You could light the gas that came out of their taps. Their water came from a well, smelled terribly of sulfur and left yellow stains on the porcelain.

They lived above the Marcellus Shale formation, a large zone that may contain 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

Companies are currently using hydrofrac technology to recover this gas.www.google.com... qlAeL4_20CA&usg=AFQjCNFh_8iXSSGXhQm6QzM1_XFtTh1wzQ

[edit on 14-5-2010 by butcherguy]



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 07:15 AM
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I wish my water did that.
It would not take me long to put a separator on the water system and pipe the gas to the heater and stove.

No more worry about the water exploding and free heating for the home.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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from ahmonrarh

Ok, not to throw this in another arena, but what does the railroad commission have to do with natural gas drilling? And why answer to them? (As simplistic thought suggests, railroad ties and rails are mostly above ground)

That's a good question. I don't know why the RRC oversees gas drilling,
but I can tell you that they are understaffed. I only know of one officer to
take care of hundreds of wells and many drilling rigs and disposals.


Another thing...A had, and have, an opportunity to work for Halliburton,
for better pay and benefits, but I just can't bring myself to stoop that low,
so I work for smaller companies, and keep respect for myself.



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