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AUSTRALIAN evidence of Nibiru taken TODAY!

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posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:01 AM
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Jello ive Been KOoking sa sum for to long ans now cant see well, my eys hurt but i am going to look for nibirud today all day, ill come later.




posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:24 AM
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reply to post by rajaten
 


If you can get hold of a welding mask you will see if there is something there or not .i will do the same tomorrow .Cameras are not to be trusted as there are to many possibilities of reflections or dirt on lens etc.Hope you find what you are looking for.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:25 AM
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just get a damn telescope and find out properly for yourselves



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by Gloster
Jello ive Been KOoking sa sum for to long ans now cant see well, my eys hurt but i am going to look for nibirud today all day, ill come later.




ahahahha dude thats classic ... nice work



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 04:28 AM
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Originally posted by rajaten
reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


A solar flare?! but it looks like an isolated beacon of light dude check the new photos i just put up


Im just saying that Im in Australia too

If it is visible where the Op is, then it would be visible here also. There has been nothing like that all day here, so i have to assume its an optical effect



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 06:52 AM
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Try taking several pics of the sun with the sun in different positions in the photo. A lens flare will move positions (relative to the sun) or disappear.



[edit on 14/5/10 by NuclearPaul]



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by Gloster
Jello ive Been KOoking sa sum for to long ans now cant see well, my eys hurt but i am going to look for nibirud today all day, ill come later.









O k no w i can notr see 7becou5se sun to ...brightt ,.doctor not3 jappy my eye s red he said Pleass n ot5 more4 nibiruu not good ..



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 09:04 PM
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Looks like a lens flare. Very typical 'Nibiru' photo.



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 09:09 PM
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It's called a lens flare. Try taking 10 pics of the same palce, your supposed nibiru will move around the real sun..
Trust me, I've tried and I even saw the supposed Nibiru on the tip of my roof (I took the picture on my balcony).

:\

Sorry



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 06:33 AM
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Thanks for your comments guys, I guess it was just a lens flare
I shouldnt get excited so easily haha appreciate all your feedback.

Namaste



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 07:13 AM
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Remember to NOT look through the viewfinder when taking photos of the sun -- look at the digital screen. Also, without proper training and sun filters it's a bad idea to point binoculars or really anything that magnifies toward the sun. If it's difficult to look at the sun without the instrument, it will be compounded by looking through binoculars/telescope, etc.

Protect your eyes. Even looking at the moon at night through a telescope or binoculars can damage your eyes -- that is reflected sunlight. Many telescopes come with moon filters for viewing a full or nearly full moon.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 07:18 AM
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reply to post by rajaten
 


Nothing wrong with getting excited over an interesting photo, but if you capture something like that, particularly of bright sun, trying changing the zoom and taking other shots from different elevations/angles. If your "object" moves/disappears/changes, it is not a fixed object.

Another quick note: Even welding goggles may not give a person adequate protection for extended viewing. Here's a link from Mr. Eclipse that talks more about this. I have not verified this information; be careful with your eyes.

From the link:

Permanent eye damage can result from looking at the disk of the Sun directly, or through a camera viewfinder, or with binoculars or a telescope even when only a thin crescent of the Sun or Baily's Beads remain. The 1 percent of the Sun's surface still visible is about 10,000 times brighter than the full moon. Staring at the Sun under such circumstances is like using a magnifying glass to focus sunlight onto tinder. The retina is delicate and irreplaceable. There is little or nothing a retinal surgeon will be able to do to help you. Never look at the Sun outside of the total phase of an eclipse unless you have adequate eye protection.



[edit on 15/5/10 by argentus]

[edit on 15/5/10 by argentus]



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