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Black hole 'hurled out of galaxy'

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posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.

The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra space X-ray observatory.

However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.

The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its centre.

Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.

news.bbc.co.uk...




posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:18 AM
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im probaby wrong but i thought the defenition of a black hole was that it has no mass but infinite density.
the outer part of the black hole isn't actually a part of the black hole.

still though.... a star for you for my interest in this.

[edit on 12-5-2010 by listerofsmeg]



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:23 AM
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A black hole has too much mass, in too small a space.
Density is how mass fills space.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:41 AM
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i thought that was volume.
you were right about black hole mass though ish.
the mass is too compact. mass isn't the main factor of gravity as something with enormous mass but nearly no density would have nearly no grav pull.


[edit on 12-5-2010 by listerofsmeg]



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by union_jack
A supermassive black hole may have been observed in the process of being hurled from its parent galaxy at high speed.

The finding comes from analysis of data collected by the US Chandra space X-ray observatory.

However, there are alternative explanations for the observation.

The work, by an international team of astronomers, has been published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Normally, each galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its centre.

Given that these objects can have masses equivalent to one billion Suns, it takes a special set of conditions to cause this to happen.

news.bbc.co.uk...


Okay, since when was it considered fact that supermassive black holes are at the center of all galaxies? Last I checked, this was a theory.

In fact, it still just is.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by TarzanBeta
 


it a fairly sound theory considering black holes a theory themselves.
what else could cause a galaxy to be circular and rotating around a point.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


What causes planets to form a sphere and rotate?

Supposedly the earth has a molten iron core.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by union_jack
 


That's very interesting. Now....

If this is true then we as a species don't know everything now do we!


If we could figure out what caused this then we will make some possible progress toward wormhole tech IMO



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by TarzanBeta
 


that is so very small scale in comparison to a galaxy, same principles apply.
mabye in a few billion billion billion years our galaxy will be spherical.
why is a bubble spherical, why are eggs almost spherical, why does everything in the universe seem to adopt this shape.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 11:56 AM
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Einstein's theories prevent a universe with more than one black hole.

Laplace's Alleged "Black Hole"
G. C. McVittie, The Observatory, Vol. 98, p. 272-274, 1978
www.sjcrothers.plasmaresources.com...

"I suggest that the important conclusion to be drawn is that there is no analogue of the GR black hole in Newtonian gravitational theory even when this is bolstered up with the long-discarded corpuscular theory of light. GR black holes occur in certain highly-specialized exact solutions of Einstein's field equations and so far only solutions containing a single centrally-placed black hole are known. There is, therefore, no way of asserting through some analogy with Newtonian gravitational theory that a black hole could be a component of a close binary system or that two black holes could collide. An existence theorem would first be needed to show that Einstein's field equations contained solutions which described such configurations."



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 12:23 PM
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Very interesting thread.
I wish the article gave a little more information though. A little sparse.

I wonder why the models show that the larger of the 2 black holes would be flung away.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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Someone told me that the gravity of a black hole comes from it's mass and when this mass is pulled in a smaller space gravity intensifies.




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