It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New reactor aims for fusion ignition

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 11 2010 @ 04:14 PM
link   

Russia and Italy have agreed to build a new fusion reactor outside Moscow that they hope could become the first to achieve ignition - the point where a fusion reaction becomes self-sustaining instead of requiring a constant input of energy.

The design is based on MIT’s Alcator fusion research program, which in its present version - Alcator C-Mod - has the highest magnetic field and highest plasma pressure of any fusion reactor in the world. Ignitor will be about twice the size of Alcator C-Mod, with a main donut-shaped chamber 1.3 meters across, and an even stronger magnetic field.


www.tgdaily.com...

Could this be the magic bullet for the real takoff of fusion power? My word we need it! If they can get the reactor to work sustainably, creating its own energy instead of requiring an input of energy, we will have a never ending supply of clean energy.

Line up big, bad Corporations and make your bids at the podium please!


More links to the story
www.earthtechling.com...
www.greenbang.com...
nextbigfuture.com...




posted on May, 11 2010 @ 04:32 PM
link   
not entirely sure but isn't that against the law of thermodynamics.
where perpetual energy is impossible.
i know nothing of fusion energy and don't pretend to so i welcome debate.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 04:40 PM
link   
reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


All it appears you need is a gas made from Deuterium and Tritium to get the reactor going. I am also no expert on fusion power. It just seems pretty exciting as a future energy source.


Deuterium can be extracted from water and tritium is produced from lithium, which is found in the earth's crust. Fuel supplies will therefore last for millions of years.



To get energy from fusion, gas from a combination of types of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – is heated to very high temperatures (100 million degrees Celsius). One way to achieve these conditions is a method called ‘magnetic confinement' – controlling the hot gas (known as a plasma) with strong magnets.


www.fusion.org.uk...

[edit on 11-5-2010 by Peruvianmonk]



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 04:48 PM
link   
reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


It's not perpetual energy.

Lets use hydrogen for an example. If you can get a chain reaction going then all you need to do is feed it hydrogen and it will do the rest and the chain reaction will continue until there is no more hydrogen.

In this case the fuel comes from Deuterium and Tritium.

Does that make sense?


[edit on 11-5-2010 by DaMod]



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 04:58 PM
link   
reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


Wouldn`t this be something else ! Wow .....

Though , i believe one of the set backs related to damage to the lining of the reactor walls, this despite the containment fields holding the plasma in place.

Perhaps someone familiar on the tech could clarify that , .... was that one of the reasons why the rarer isotope Helium 3 was favoured to fuel such reactors ?



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:04 PM
link   
reply to post by DaMod
 


Yeh i just thought it was perpetual energy. However further research bought me to the same conclusion you put down on the page.

It would seem there is little chance of any major accident like you see in nuclear fission reactors. Which is obviously a massive advantage.


There is also no risk of a runaway reaction in a fusion reactor, since the plasma is normally burnt at optimal conditions, and any significant change will render it unable to produce excess heat.

In fusion reactors the reaction process is so delicate that this level of safety is inherent; no elaborate failsafe mechanism is required. Although the plasma in a fusion power plant will have a volume of 1000 cubic meters or more, the density of the plasma is extremely low, and the total amount of fusion fuel in the vessel is very small, typically a few grams.

If the fuel supply is closed, the reaction stops within seconds. In comparison, a fission reactor is typically loaded with enough fuel for one or several years, and no additional fuel is necessary to keep the reaction going.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:12 PM
link   
ok this is now good to my ears.... well eyes.
i must find out more.
thanks



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:20 PM
link   
reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


It is happening here in the U.S. also although on a much larger scale,... and it is being kept suspiciously low key.

lasers.llnl.gov...

[edit on 11-5-2010 by slane69]



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:23 PM
link   
reply to post by slane69
 


thats probably because they're waiting for russia to make progress before they can steal it. no offence intended by the way.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:23 PM
link   
I await the people that don't understand what fusion is and claim that it's going to destroy the world and we should stop researching it.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 05:40 PM
link   
reply to post by slane69
 


Yes. This reactor being built by the Italians and Russians is based on the reactor at MIT in Boston. However i had not heard of this beast in California.

What will the fossil fuel industry take on an actual breakthrough on fusion energy be?



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 10:33 PM
link   
Chances are if fusion becomes viable fossil fuel companies will probably shift to mining lithium and converting it.



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join