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Unusual Apollo pics, video and transcripts

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posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
It was built perfectly strong enough

For the 'moon buggy' to have performed like it appears in the youtube clip previously posted .. I think it's build quality would have to have been a little better. This looks nothing more than a thin strip of aluminium with a solder joint.





NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Collection
Name of Image:
Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) Wheel Strut
Full Description:
This is a close-up view of a right rear wheel strut of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) No. 1.

edit on 13-10-2010 by ppk55 because: added source




posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 



For the 'moon buggy' to have performed like it appears in the youtube clip previously posted .. I think it's build quality would have to have been a little better. This looks nothing more than a thin strip of aluminium with a solder joint.


Well that definitely shows your credentials for assessing mechanical engineering.

"This looks like", IE your opinion, not based upon science or logic whatsoever.

Well thank god those Ph.d's at NASA use better skills to determine what to build things out of than you do.
:shk:



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


Firstly, it should be plainly obvious to anyone that the photo showing the vehicle over-all, shows it partially "collapsed" for stowage. What you need to do, now, is RESEARCH into how it was unfolded, and all the pieces arranged for normal operation, on the surface. For all we know, that "tab" you highlight was designed to "hold" it in a certain position, when folded....and would break away as the wheel suspension assemblies were positioned for use.

Here, I haven't gone all the way through it, there's probably EVERYTHING you want to know, from a technical standpoint, in this link:

virtualology.com...


BTW....know what contractor built the LRV?? (Hint: They have a LOT of experience with engineering. They build AIRPLANES. That is another machine where weight penalties are not welcomed, and engineering expertise is used to know just HOW STRONG to make something, without over-building it).



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 11:18 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55

Originally posted by weedwhacker
It was built perfectly strong enough

For the 'moon buggy' to have performed like it appears in the youtube clip previously posted .. I think it's build quality would have to have been a little better. This looks nothing more than a thin strip of aluminium with a solder joint.





NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Collection
Name of Image:
Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) Wheel Strut
Full Description:
This is a close-up view of a right rear wheel strut of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) No. 1.

edit on 13-10-2010 by ppk55 because: added source


You realize those struts are only there to hold the wheels in the stowed position, right?

Page 1-74, section 1.9.3.3 of the Lunar Roving Vehicle Operations Handbook:


The wire mesh LRV wheels are held in the stowed position by four aluminum tube struts. One end of each strut is held by a steel pin to the aft or forward chassis structure (figure 1-46). The other end of each strut is held to a wheel hub by a pin (in the hub). The pins in the chassis are pulled by a steel cable, so linked as to pull the pins as the chassis opens , approximately 170° . When the pins are pulled, the spring-loaded wheels move to deployed or operational position. As the wheels rotate forward to the deployed position, a mechanism within the wheel hub retracts the remaining pin retaining the wheel strut. The strut is thus freed at both ends, and falls free during wheel deployment movement. Each strut is retained by a 1/8 inch diameter mylar tether.



edit on 13-10-2010 by nataylor because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by Pinke

Originally posted by ppk55

Originally posted by Pinke
but you say you're cinematographer .


Show me where I wrote that I am a cinematographer please?
It goes back to your accuracy and understanding of events and the credence we can place on your posts.




Originally posted by ppk55
My profession is in cinematography, and I can tell you, to pull of this shot is bull no matter which way you try to spin it.

reply to post by Phage
 

No amount of curved mirror will reveal more of you than a normal mirror.
It will change the look of it, but it won't magically reveal new information than a flat mirror could.


Originally posted by wmd_2008
The helmet is curved go look in a spoon with the back towards you face very similar effect


[edit on 22-4-2010 by ppk55]


Source Link: www.abovetopsecret.com...

How does this fall back on my accuracy or whatever? Anyway, there's the information you requested. You're not in cinematography any more or I'm misunderstanding this post I guess.


PPK please don't attack my credibility and understanding then ignore the fact it happened.



posted on Oct, 18 2010 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by nataylor
You realize those struts are only there to hold the wheels in the stowed position, right?


Well I do now. Thank you for correcting me.
I'm the first to admit I didn't research this topic enough.

The great thing about ATS is, it can force you focus on something you might not have paid enough attention to.
Bringing this to my attention is a fantastic thing because I will have quite a few pages now to post on this topic, after educating myself sufficiently.

However, in the meantime whilst I was looking into the build quality, suspension, steering, and all aspects of the LRV, one image jumped out at me.

Before looking at the second image ... please look at the first and see if you can spot anything wrong.




and here is the enlarged image...





Why they have replaced that section will become apparent in my next posts.



posted on Oct, 18 2010 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 




What is this??


Wow another completely illogical question.


When the astronauts sit in the LRV that is the panel that the mens feet rest upon while riding in the rover. If you actually took the time read about your claims, you might not have as many issues with answers.

The below source shows the part you say is in question.

Source

It is a FOOT REST. Wow huge conspiracy there.



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 05:44 AM
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Originally posted by theability
It is a FOOT REST. Wow huge conspiracy there.


Compare these 2 photos, and now tell me it's a foot rest.

Shouldn't the foot rest be a lot more forward. In one photo the foot rest is a good way in front of the suspension, in the other it's almost resting on it.




One other question, how can the antenna pole at one point be in front of the suspension, and in the next photo be attached to it?

In this image the 'foot rest' is resting right near the suspension, however in the image above it is not.
edit on 19-10-2010 by ppk55 because: Added antenna pole question


jra

posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 06:43 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55

Originally posted by theability
It is a FOOT REST. Wow huge conspiracy there.


Compare these 2 photos, and now tell me it's a foot rest.


It's a footrest.


Shouldn't the foot rest be a lot more forward. In one photo the foot rest is a good way in front of the suspension, in the other it's almost resting on it.


I don't know what photos you're looking at, but it's the footrest. It's in the same place in both photos. The same goes for the antenna. I think your sense of perspective is off.

Look at his feet
edit on 19-10-2010 by jra because: Added an image.



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 07:10 AM
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So my thought of the photo shopping is below .. it looks like the flag has a different back ground lined all down the pole. its like a lighter version of black lol. enjoy


edit on 19-10-2010 by srbouska because: oops on the picture



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 07:14 AM
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Originally posted by jra
I don't know what photos you're looking at


Um, perhaps the ones I posted above with the arrows?

If you draw a line between the wheels like I've done you'll see where the antenna pole should be compared to the photo below.



Here is where the antenna is in this pic...


edit on 19-10-2010 by ppk55 because: images update



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 07:50 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 

It looks like you are, once more, being victim of a perspective misunderstanding.

If possible, I suggest you get a model of the LRV, that way it would be easier for you to understand the photos taken from different points of view.

In this case you could see that it's the foot rest.

Edit:
Look at this photo:

You can see that the antenna is on the front-left corner of the rover's structure.

If you look at this photo

you can see that the antenna is on the right spot.
edit on 19/10/2010 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 08:00 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


Your attempts at "feigned ignorance" are no longer amusing.

Bottom photo shows the antenna mounting pole in the correct position WELL FORWARD of the front left wheel, and the associated LEFT-HAND footrest in the proper position as well. You have a photo ABOVE the second one, from a different viewing angle....with an arrow pointing to the RIGHT-HAND footrest, and asking "Is this the same footrest?" Obviously, no....because one photo is highlighting the LEFT footrest, and the other is highlighting the RIGHT footrest.

(This is such an unnecessary conversation ---- but possibly may, just MAY stem the tide of the inane postings, like the one above ---copycat??? ---about the flag and "photoshopping"
Your continued trolling with these facile and illogical questions diminishes the spirit of ATS, and especially fouls this particular Forum's intended role. It also leads to the silliness like the one I just mentioned).

I must have compassion for youm though, IF it is true that, when you look at the bottom photo example, you sincerely CANNOT understand the concept of a three-dimensional object, when represented in two dimensions, as in a photograph or drawing or painting. IF you truly do 'NOT' understand the concept of perspective, then it is entirely possible there may be a medical condition afflicting you that is responsible. I might wish to have it checked, if I were you....not sure about the Aussie medical system, but if it's like Canada or the UK, it probably won't cost much.....




edit on 19 October 2010 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
It looks like you are, once more, being victim of a perspective misunderstanding.


Is that the only word you know to try and debunk things ... 'perspective.' I should try that next time I'm in an argument .. 'no .. you're wrong .. it's all about perspective.'

Let's see how your perspective handles this one.

Here is how the double wishbone suspension should be attached to the LRV.


(from the lrv handbook)

And here it is in 'real life' on the 'moon'.



Oh, it's just perspective again... silly me.

edit on 19-10-2010 by ppk55 because: image add



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 08:48 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55

Originally posted by ArMaP
It looks like you are, once more, being victim of a perspective misunderstanding.


Is that the only word you know to try and debunk things ... 'perspective.' I should try that next time I'm in an argument .. 'no .. you're wrong .. it's all about perspective.'

Let's see how your perspective handles this one.

Here is how the double wishbone suspension should be attached to the LRV.


(from the lrv handbook)

And here it is in 'real life' on the 'moon'.



Oh, it's just perspective again... silly me.

edit on 19-10-2010 by ppk55 because: image add


I honestly think you have spatial awareness issues. First it was the so-called "stick" in the boulder photo, now this. It's clear the upper suspension attaches about the frame rail in both the diagram and photo.

Head-on view of the suspension:


Photo with red arrow resting on frame rail:



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by nataylor
I honestly think you have spatial awareness issues.


I honestly think you have ADD issues. You took 15 minutes to read, photoshop and post a reply.
Was there any time left for reflection? consideration? Seems not.

Regardless, here is what I'm suggesting reduced to the lowest common denominator so you'll have time to digest it.

In the LRV operations manual, this is how the double wishbone suspension is attached to the frame.



However, when you look at a 'real world' example, it doesn't match.



Which is wrong, the photo or the diagram?



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


I think you are being slightly disingenuous concerning your "LRV operations manual" source image. Not sure what you're using, there...but it appears to be an over-simplified representation.

Here:

www.astronautix.com...

IN the above link, look at the three-view diagram, captioned:


LRV Drawing
Credit: NASA


Now, do some real research, instead of this foolishness.



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
I think you are being slightly disingenuous concerning your "LRV operations manual" source image.


What's wrong with using a NASA source? Problem now ?
It's page 54 on adobe reader, and page 1-44 on the original document.
www.hq.nasa.gov...
edit on 19-10-2010 by ppk55 because: add page numbers



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55

Originally posted by nataylor
I honestly think you have spatial awareness issues.


I honestly think you have ADD issues. You took 15 minutes to read, photoshop and post a reply.
Was there any time left for reflection? consideration? Seems not.
I don't need to reflect because visually, it makes perfect sense to me.



Which is wrong, the photo or the diagram?
Neither is wrong. Your interpretation of them is wrong. As is clear in the head-on view of the suspension, the upper arm attaches to a bracket a couple inches above the frame rail. It's the same thing in the photo.

To help you out, here are the same parts highlighted in the same colors:








posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


Look at PAGE 14 from your link.

To see the actual, correct and detailed line drawing diagram of the front wheel suspension...with wheel turned outwards, for clarity.....

....compare it to the diagram YOU have been flooding this thread with, lately....

edit on 19 October 2010 by weedwhacker because: Sick of it all......




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