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New star in the sky? 10th planet? wtf?

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posted on May, 10 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 




so it is understandable why Oz Weatherman mentioned Nibiru,


Oh I understand. He needs to fire a few warning shots, god forbid people with opposing views actually entered the thread, can't have that now, can we?




posted on May, 10 2010 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


yeah.... pretty sure that while I can see it as Stellarium says Venus is below the horizon. Then it's not Venus.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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Sidenote, you rude people. Venus is not *THE* defacto brightest 'star' in the sky. Despite what general stereotypes exist about it. Even in the space programs it is not the brightest or largest object.

Get off your horses. And help.

I found people suggesting Stellarium and what info to post, and possible objects helpful.

Every one of you that simply said "It's Venus" or "roflmayo Niburu", etc. Really should avoid posting. Because you're useless.

Like I said. From My view, it's Capella. And it >IS< brighter than Venus. And why am I sure? Because I see it after Venus dips below the horizon.

Sorry, no pics as I only have a crappy cellphone camera. But I'm not here trying to convince any of you of what it is. I'm trying to find out for myself.

Not for you, not for stars, not for flags.

So grow up, and be a productive member of the boards.

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 02:57 PM
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Three nights ago my brother noticed it for the first time and went ballistic. He and a friend were on one of our other farms here in Kentucky looking at the fireball through a 10X rifle scope. They both swore they could see flames shooting off of it.

I'm on a different farm about six miles away and as part of my daily routine I bed down livestock at dusk. I've been watching this thing (I assumed that it was a planet- probably Venus) most of the winter and watching it grow brighter as we've progressed into late spring. It is an awesome sight in the night sky and the night my brother went nuts it was especially bright.

I'm glad to finally be able to tell my brother what it is- Venus. Thanks to all you star gazers.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by CmdrZero
 


Not to be rude, even though it's going to sound rude.

But it's quite ignorant to come in, and say "Well it must be Venus" considering everyone who is touting Venus has offered no evidence aside from the typical "Venus is the brightest planet" rhetoric.

Further more, it craps on my thread, suggesting the Planet/Star in the OP's question is in fact Venus. Despite any real evidence to the contrary, other than anecdotal rhetoric.

So yeah...

Thanks for that.

. @ your Signature multipled by all users doing that in this thread.

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:29 PM
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I saw it last night, around 10:30 EST, it was about a third of the way up in the sky, in the Northwest, at first I thought it was a plane with its landing lights on but it didn't get closer, so I assumed it was Venus, but some here are saying it should have been gone by that time?



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by mryanbrown
yeah.... pretty sure that while I can see it as Stellarium says Venus is below the horizon. Then it's not Venus.

I'm not sure what time of the night you are looking, but Venus is certainly visible for a while between sunset and the time Venus itself sets.

The Sun sets around 7:30 PM or so, and soon thereafter Venus becomes visible. Then Venus sets at around 9:30 PM. That would mean Venus would be visible for about 60 to 90 minutes.

What time are you viewing this object?


Originally posted by mryanbrown
Sidenote, you rude people. Venus is not *THE* defacto brightest 'star' in the sky. Despite what general stereotypes exist about it. Even in the space programs it is not the brightest or largest object.

Get off your horses. And help.

I found people suggesting Stellarium and what info to post, and possible objects helpful.

Every one of you that simply said "It's Venus" or "roflmayo Niburu", etc. Really should avoid posting. Because you're useless.

Like I said. From My view, it's Capella. And it >IS< brighter than Venus. And why am I sure? Because I see it after Venus dips below the horizon...


Venus IS the brightest object in the sky (after the Sun and Moon). Venus right now is about at magnitude -4.0. The magnitude of Venus can vary throughout the year as it gets closer & farther from the Earth, but the Magnitude never goes any fainter than -3.5.

Capella has a magnitude of a little above 0, so it is fainter than Venus. Venus has been exceptionally bright lately.

Edit To Add:
Perhaps what you think is Venus setting is actually Betelgeuse or Aldebaran (other bright stars setting near Venus, right before Venus), and what you think is Capella is actually Venus.

The reason I say this is that I looked last night, and Venus is definitely the brightest object in that part of the sky. My skies are clear again today, so I'll specifically make a point of comparing Venus to Capella tonight -- but, like I said, Venus is noticeably bright right now and stands out above the rest of the "stars" in the sky.



[edit on 5/10/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by I_am_Spartacus
 


What is your location? I think it's possible someone further north could see it later than someone closer to the south.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:55 PM
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Ok ladies and gents…

If it is Venus/Cappella or what ever I haven’t seen it this bright at this time of the year image exif is available it has been taken tonight, right now, from my balcony, with a western sky, Norway, without any enhancement..





taken with 20x optical zoom +1,7 tele converter..(no digital zoom were used)

Here is exif

[Camera]
Image description : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Camera Manufacturer : OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera Model : SP570UZ
Orientation : top-left (1)
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Software : Version 1.1
Date modified : 2010:05:10 22:10:05
YCbCr Positioning : co-sited (2)

[Image]
Exposure time [s] : 1/30
F-Number : 4.5
Exposure program : Normal (2)
ISO speed ratings : 100
EXIF version : 02.21
Date taken : 2010:05:10 22:10:05
Date digitized : 2010:05:10 22:10:05
Components configuration : YCbCr
Compressed bits per pixel : 4
Exposure bias value : 0
Max aperture : F2.8
Metering mode : Center weight (2)
Light source : Unknown (0)
Flash : No flash
Focal length [mm] : 92
FlashPix Version : 01.00
Colour space : sRGB
EXIF image width : 2560
EXIF image length : 1920
Interoperability offset : 1714
File source : DSC
Scene type : A directly photographed image
Custom rendered : Normal process (0)
Exposure mode : Auto (0)
White balance : Auto (0)
Digital zoom : 0
Scene capture type : Standard (0)
Gain control : Low gain up (1)
Contrast : Normal (0)
Saturation : High (2)
Sharpness : Normal (0)

[IOP]
IOP index : R98
IOP version : 0100

[Makernotes]
Shooting Mode : 0
Compression setting : SHQ
Macro mode : Normal
Digital zoom : 1/1
Firmware version : D4364
Picture info : [pictureInfo] Resolution=2 [Camera Info] Type=D4364
Camera ID : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

[Thumbnail]
Compression : 6
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Thumbnail offset : 9204
Thumbnail length : 1472

The other of is taken with wideangle 28mm



Image description : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Camera Manufacturer : OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera Model : SP570UZ
Orientation : top-left (1)
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Software : Version 1.1
Date modified : 2010:05:10 22:12:23
YCbCr Positioning : co-sited (2)



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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[Image]
Exposure time [s] : 1/30
F-Number : 2.8
Exposure program : Normal (2)
ISO speed ratings : 100
EXIF version : 02.21
Date taken : 2010:05:10 22:12:23
Date digitized : 2010:05:10 22:12:23
Components configuration : YCbCr
Compressed bits per pixel : 4
Exposure bias value : 0
Max aperture : F2.8
Metering mode : Center weight (2)
Light source : Unknown (0)
Flash : No flash
Focal length [mm] : 4.6
FlashPix Version : 01.00
Colour space : sRGB
EXIF image width : 2048
EXIF image length : 1536
Interoperability offset : 1714
File source : DSC
Scene type : A directly photographed image
Custom rendered : Normal process (0)
Exposure mode : Auto (0)
White balance : Auto (0)
Digital zoom : 0
Scene capture type : Standard (0)
Gain control : Low gain up (1)
Contrast : Normal (0)
Saturation : High (2)
Sharpness : Normal (0)

[IOP]
IOP index : R98
IOP version : 0100

[Makernotes]
Shooting Mode : 0
Compression setting : SHQ
Macro mode : Normal
Digital zoom : 1/1
Firmware version : D4364
Picture info : [pictureInfo] Resolution=2 [Camera Info] Type=D4364
Camera ID : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

[Thumbnail]
Compression : 6
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Thumbnail offset : 9204
Thumbnail length : 3245

This one is without converter




and exif..


[Camera]
Image description : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Camera Manufacturer : OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera Model : SP570UZ
Orientation : top-left (1)
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Software : Version 1.1
Date modified : 2010:05:10 22:10:22
YCbCr Positioning : co-sited (2)

[Image]
Exposure time [s] : 1/30
F-Number : 4.4
Exposure program : Normal (2)
ISO speed ratings : 100
EXIF version : 02.21
Date taken : 2010:05:10 22:10:22
Date digitized : 2010:05:10 22:10:22
Components configuration : YCbCr
Compressed bits per pixel : 4
Exposure bias value : 0
Max aperture : F2.8
Metering mode : Center weight (2)
Light source : Unknown (0)
Flash : No flash
Focal length [mm] : 33.3
FlashPix Version : 01.00
Colour space : sRGB
EXIF image width : 2560
EXIF image length : 1920
Interoperability offset : 1714
File source : DSC
Scene type : A directly photographed image
Custom rendered : Normal process (0)
Exposure mode : Auto (0)
White balance : Auto (0)
Digital zoom : 0
Scene capture type : Standard (0)
Gain control : Low gain up (1)
Contrast : Normal (0)
Saturation : High (2)
Sharpness : Normal (0)

[IOP]
IOP index : R98
IOP version : 0100

[Makernotes]
Shooting Mode : 0
Compression setting : SHQ
Macro mode : Normal
Digital zoom : 1/1
Firmware version : D4364
Picture info : [pictureInfo] Resolution=2 [Camera Info] Type=D4364
Camera ID : OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

[Thumbnail]
Compression : 6
X Resolution : 72
Y Resolution : 72
Resolution unit : Inch
Thumbnail offset : 9204
Thumbnail length : 1386



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by amkia
 


If it's the brightest object in your western sky right now in Norway, then it's most likely Venus.

Like I said before, Venus has been VERY bright lately (at magnitude -4.0). That magnitude is over TWICE as bright as Sirius -- and Sirius is the brightest true "Star" in the sky. (Sirius is the star you see by following the line of Orion's belt).



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People


Yay a helpful post. I argue about Venus being brighte due to the fact it's subjective. One of those super-bright amazing led flashlights is technically brighter than a 1million lumens lantern. But guess which displays far larger, and is more noticeable? (Despite not being as bright)

Saying Venus is the brightest object in the sky, allows for a system of math to be constructed around that premise to skew facts. While they fit, they are not necessarily true.

So beyond that.

I'm correlating it with constellations as best I can. Trying to track it. I'm completely ignorant to this stuff. So I think it will take me more than a day to be sure of what >I'm< looking at.

I'm going to apply actual knowledge, not assumptions to verify.

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by mryanbrown
reply to post by I_am_Spartacus
 


What is your location? I think it's possible someone further north could see it later than someone closer to the south.


Southeast Michigan. It was at least 1/3, (actually maybe closer to halfway as I look out the window right now and reassess the tree line) up from the horizon, , I don't remember ever seeing Venus so big and bright, like I said I thought it was a 747 with landing lights on (we are right in DTW approach route) but it wasn't as it never got closer after about 5 minutes of watching. I just figured it was Venus and while I did think about it it a few times today, I didn't think I had seen "Planet X". I just chanced upon this forum today and if the times correlating location in sky being given are correct, it has me a little intrigued.


[edit on 10-5-2010 by I_am_Spartacus]



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by mryanbrown
Sidenote, you rude people. Venus is not *THE* defacto brightest 'star' in the sky. Despite what general stereotypes exist about it. Even in the space programs it is not the brightest or largest object.

Get off your horses. And help.

I found people suggesting Stellarium and what info to post, and possible objects helpful.

Every one of you that simply said "It's Venus" or "roflmayo Niburu", etc. Really should avoid posting. Because you're useless.

Like I said. From My view, it's Capella. And it >IS< brighter than Venus. And why am I sure? Because I see it after Venus dips below the horizon.

Sorry, no pics as I only have a crappy cellphone camera. But I'm not here trying to convince any of you of what it is. I'm trying to find out for myself.

Not for you, not for stars, not for flags.

So grow up, and be a productive member of the boards.

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]


Top 10 brightest stars in order, so Capella is 5th overall of all stars and third right now at my local time of 11:00 PM in the West behind the planets Saturn and Mars.

Sirius
Canopus
Rigil
Vega
Capella
Betelgeuse
Arcturus
Rigel
Procyon
Achernar
Hadar

They are close, but eariler Venus was up and WOW now that is bright...

Venus 18°41.1' 286° -4.9



City
ortland,OR
Date: 5/11/2010
Time: 05:58:36 GMT
Latitude: 45°31.0'N
Longitude: 122°40.0'W


Object Hc Az Mag
Saturn 45°05.3' 204° +0.5
Mars 36°02.6' 258° +0.3
Capella 17°12.4' 319° +0.2




[edit on 11-5-2010 by Xtrozero]



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


I just don't understand why it's soo hard to believe it's Venus. Some see Niburu/10th planet behind everything even when people give them solid evidence to the contrary.

I do believe we have a binary star. It makes sense since binary star systems are the most prevelent in the known Universe.

However, this is not the case. The end of spring beginning of summer has always been the best time to view Venus out here.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 07:17 AM
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reply to post by mryanbrown
 


There has been repeated links and pictures offered by other posters for the OP and others to at least try to rule out if this is Venus or Capella. To say everyone is saying it must be 'venus' just cause its so bright is BS. There is tons of info to work with in this thread for people to judge for themselves. The problem is....it means a little work on everyone elses part to look up the sites offered, judge the pictures offered, and observe the sky and judge for themselves.

And about Venus being the brightest object...besides the moon. THIS DOES MATTER.

If someone wants to be a real judge about this....the would set themselves up a chair pointing west, they would make sure to go out AS the sun sets, then stay and watch well after the sun sets, and they would become familiar with the brightest object in the western sky. After they can be familiar with where Venus IS....they can then start to rule out that IT CANT BE VENUS.

Until then...it is important to familiarize ourselves with the brightest object and its path....then go from there.

The first step to any problem.....FAMILIARIZE yourself. So learning about Venus and its path is a first step for anyone that is seeing a really bright object.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 07:18 AM
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reply to post by mryanbrown
 


Make sure your settings on Stellarium match your location. Venus is staying in the sky longer and longer now.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by mryanbrown
Sidenote, you rude people. Venus is not *THE* defacto brightest 'star' in the sky. Despite what general stereotypes exist about it. Even in the space programs it is not the brightest or largest object.

Get off your horses. And help.

I found people suggesting Stellarium and what info to post, and possible objects helpful.

Every one of you that simply said "It's Venus" or "roflmayo Niburu", etc. Really should avoid posting. Because you're useless.

Like I said. From My view, it's Capella. And it >IS< brighter than Venus. And why am I sure? Because I see it after Venus dips below the horizon.

Sorry, no pics as I only have a crappy cellphone camera. But I'm not here trying to convince any of you of what it is. I'm trying to find out for myself.

Not for you, not for stars, not for flags.

So grow up, and be a productive member of the boards.

[edit on 10-5-2010 by mryanbrown]


You need help or you are really seeing something that is not a star or planet....because there is no freaking way what so ever that Capella is showing brighter then Venus.

Im having doubts that you have observed the real Venus yet. I wonder if there is a object in the way blocking your view from it which is very possible cause its so low in the sky. I have to walk far out into my front yard to observe Venus due to a tree that blocks its view.

Venus is so freaing bright....other stars and planets do not compare. These are facts....simple proveable facts. Its up to you to work with them or not.

If you could take a pic with Venus and Capella together in the same frame so we can see what you are seeing....?



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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And for everyone saying 'I have never seen it this bright before'.

Just google threads about Venus....this is the same thing people say about it every year. Venus goes through stages like the moon....at times being very bright, at times being less bright....just last year there were a bunch of these threads that said the exact same things this one say, such as 'I have never seen it so bright before'.

I hope people keep watching it, so they can see how later in the year Venus will become a morning star, and show itself in the East....then keep watching and observing....it will become a night star again like we see now, and show back in the west. Venus's path is awesome to watch and very easy to observe.

I should know, I am one of those people that started one of these threads about 2 years ago when Venus was in the East (course I didnt know it was Venus at first). I dedicated myself to following it and am still a fan who watches Venus regularly now.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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I have been noticing it as well. I kind of remeber hearing about what it was on PBS a few months ago. Any way, The link I have added shows that on May 15 2010 "Venus" will be next to the moon. We will know then if this is our star.


earthsky.org...



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