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Brain's master switch verified!!!

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posted on May, 8 2010 @ 09:14 AM
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Yeon-Kyun Shin, professor of biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology at ISU, has shown that the protein called synaptotagmin1 is the sole trigger for the release of neurotransmitters in the brain using this instrument that allows a new technique called single vesicle fusion method.


www.physorg.com...

To me this is big, as we found the protein that triggers the release of neurotransmitters in the brain. I think a lot of you on here will be interested in this article. This can help future problems of the brain like autism and epilepsy. Enjoy


[edit on 8-5-2010 by Maddogkull]




posted on May, 8 2010 @ 10:21 AM
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awsome now we have a chance at undoing all the damage from the toxic antidepressants half the world is on.

hopefully they dont abuse this and try to control our emotions or behavior.



posted on May, 8 2010 @ 12:30 PM
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Does anyone else think this is as big as I think it is? This could be one of the main contributors to consciousness.



posted on May, 8 2010 @ 09:19 PM
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This is great stuff, but only the tip of the iceberg. You can release all the neurotransmitters you want, but if there are receptor problems, or problems in individual parts of the brain, you just don't have proper neurotransmitter function. There is proper balance needed among the neurotransmitters, and if the relay system is faulty, there will still be big problems regardless if you've found the master switch or not. For example, with serotonin, there is often adequate production, but the serotonin cannot cross the synapse to go to the next station. You have what is called re-uptake, and the serotonin goes into the surrounding brain tissue and not across the synapse. With dopamine, some receptors accept dopamine, while other dopamine receptors act as gates. In this case, what happens is not as important as what does not happen. These are very complicated cascades that don't depend on any master switch as far as neurotransmitter function is concerned. There needs to be balance in the system. Much of this is hormone related, so that if there are problems with the pituitary, adrenal glands, thyroid or parathyroids, etc. just knowing the master switch doesn't fix the problem. Neuroendocrinology is exceedingly complex, and the level of organic chemistry here is profound. We're just getting in the door.

[edit on 8-5-2010 by deadred]



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