Vanishing Planets

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posted on Jul, 13 2002 @ 02:12 AM
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There have been a number of objects that were once thought to exist by astronomers, but which later 'vanished'. Here are their stories.

seds.lpl.arizona.edu...




posted on Oct, 15 2002 @ 03:09 PM
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they probably exploded or fell into a black hole.



posted on Oct, 22 2002 @ 08:30 AM
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Exploded or fell into a black hole, do you have ANY idea how unlikley that is?

Ok,black holes, red supergiants that've gone nova and had sufficient mass to collapse past the neutron star level, first of all the exact physics of a black hole are still unknown, e.g it's not known wether it's a planet that has gone superdense, or "simply" a void, or possibly both simultaneously, or of course neither. Whatever the case, I assume you're using the instabilities in Mercury's orbit coupled with the disappearance of the mythical Vulcan to suggest that there's a black hole in the vicinity? Black holes put out masses of high-band radiation, Theta, Beta, and Delta forms, Beta forms have incredible tunneling properties, more so than the other known forms (aside from Tachyons) if there was a Beta generator this close to a populated planet, we'd be in shreds by now. Also, what size do you propose this black hole to be? Anything bigger than say... a soccer ball, would have been detected by now, simply due to the lack of light in the area, ok so an orbiting black hole could appear to be a dark spot on the sun, but it would still be putting out enough radiation to be easily picked up by household radios. And another thing, how exactly could a red supergiant go nova and leave a black hole without affecting the rest of this solar system? How about we propose a new type of star to cover it? A red mini-dwarf perhaps?


Ugh, Im actually sorry about typing this, Im in a really bad mood at the mo (girlfriend related anxiety), so thanks for serving as a conduit for my rage
, I'll spare you from the explosion argument.





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