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Another Innocent Man Leaves Jail After 30 Year Wait

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posted on May, 6 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


Every little bit helps, so the reward still applies




posted on May, 6 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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What gets me is that DNA proving the wrongfully convicted has been around for years now. There should be a law requiring each state to mandate a DNA search for all convicted of serious crimes who claim innocence. This guy should've been free many years ago, not to mention being found guilty.

1981 was the year I was suppose to graduate high school. Now I've two sons, one is a junior in college and the ypunger is graduating this year.

I really feel sympathy for this man. The ridicule and scrutiny that he had to endure for all these years.

$100,000,000 won't bring back the lost years, but he'll be able to start a family and finally start living. $100,000,000 is small price to pay for such negligent work on the prosecution side.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Intelearthling
 


Yep all the police that did this to him, like what has been done to me for 18 years years should be in jail.

The police commit murder and get away with it, just make it all up.

The only way to right this wrong is the police go to jail for the same amount of time. Nearly every police person must be responsible for this sort of thing, pure scum.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


Andy let me ask you this....are you WILLING to give up a DNA sample to go into ALL federal/local databases so this kind of thing never happens to you and we can PROVE you weren't involved? Or will you be like many and scream that taking DNA from people is against this and that?

The reality is until EVERYONE is willing to submit to DNA testing the cops can ONLY go by testimonial and trace evidence....and if your DNA isn't on file, then we got nothing to match it too or NOT match it too. Its a double edge sword for some, but again, it all comes down to will you consent to giving the government your DNA?



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by rcwj1975
 


The police have desperately tried to frame me for 18 years for anything, here in london. My dna has nothing to do with this, they know i have never done anything, they did some sort of minority report tech rubbish on me. They just made it up, and they made sure i could never have a life.

Its amazing if you have the wrong nutcases investigating your life, does not matter if you never do anything, they just set out to get you forever, like my life has proved.

My dna has nothing to do with this, they have gone through my whole life, and cannot find anything.

I would say there must of been plenty like me, but they may of been framed by these scum, and they got away with it. The only concelation i had over last 18 years is that i knew they where just desperate to ruin my life.

I could of too been like this person, and there must be many more. Without ever commiting a crime, police can just do anything they want to you.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


I am not asking about your personal issues with the UK cops. I am asking, because you want those cops to pay for arresting the wrong man, if people should provide their DNA for the cops/government so we have it on file for cases like this? I am just saying that until we have access to DNA so we can compare, we only have so much to go on.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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I just wanted to mention Bo Lozoff and the Human Kindness Foundation. They visit prisons around the country to meet with prisoners and encourage them to see their time in prison as an opportunity to turn inward and examine who they are as human beings and how they became the person that did some awful things, and how to make things right however they can. They provide literature and continual support through letter writing to lifers and death row inmates. They have done a lot of good and helped many hardened criminals that society gave up on turn things around and acknowledge the things they've done, embrace their own humanity, and seek atonement when they get out, instead of returning to a life of suffering and pain. My involvement with the Human Kindness Foundation has helped me to expand my sense of humanity, and see how unjust our justice system is, and how valuable every life is, even a "worthless criminal's" life. The people we lock up are the very ones we need back in the community to serve as mentors for those who are heading down the wrong track. They alone have the experience and authority to speak to those who have been hurt and abused and have lost their humanity, lost their kindness.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 06:10 PM
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Until we STOP prosecutors from using their records of positive cases as a jumping off point to larger and greater political venues we will continue to have this problem. Egotistical Lawyers who become prosecutors only to become judges or politicians or Attorneys General have been the problem of ours as well as other countries judicial systems for centuries. You want to be a prosecutor? Fine that's what you do. If you want to run for office after fine but you should have to go back to your law practice for 5 years and then run on your merits not your record as a prosecutor!

Zindo



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 08:58 PM
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The system is very flawed.

"Policing" has become a commission-able practice, meaning, they are pushed, and brainwashed into believing that the most important part of their position is to produce.

When a crime is committed, one way or another, somebody has to go down. Once the finger is pointed, they are pressured to close he deal. Just like a sales job.

Over the years, the police have transitioned from an officer of the law, who uses his common sense and judgment to make decisions, to individuals that care about one thing, and one thing only: Closing the Deal.

Innocent people have their lives ruined every day by the law. And, I'm not saying that it is possible to have a perfect system. But, I believe that some changes would cut away a large percentage of the wrongfully convicted out there.

And, I don't know about you, but I can't even imagine the nightmare this man went through. Did he have a family, kids? Who knows. But, if even a few of these stories can be avoided, I think some changes would be worth it.

There was a time, when the police were not out there to jump on every possible crime, and turn it into as horrible a fate as possible. They were there to help. Make fair decisions. Do the "right things". And, people weren't as terrified to see those lights in their mirrors, as they are lately.

There was a time when the cops were not just filling quotas.


MBF

posted on May, 6 2010 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by onequestion
reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


From personal experience, I would say it took so long because the city/state did not want to admit wrong, and allowed ego to play a major role. It is typically hard to impossible to be able to achieve anything from prison. You are subject to the system once you are involved.


AMEN!!!!!! How many wrongs are covered up just because somebody doesn't want to admit they were wrong. I'm having to deal with a problem that the government doesn't want to admit they were wrong.



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by UberL33t


You know, I can't help but think about the scumbag that committed the actual crime and possibly got away scot-free. They say what comes around goes around. If so, then I'm sure he'll get his in the end.

For the poor fella that lost 30 years of his life for nothing. Well, you can rest assured the State of Ohio will be paying him a significant amount for their error. Although nice, no amount of money can buy you back 30 years of your life.

feeds.bignewsnetwork.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

Who do you blame?

How do you see the solution to such problems? I suspect there are others who are in prison based on actions of others..

More than a million prisoners in the US..

How can the system make sure this doesn't happen again?

Sorry if asking too many questions.

I'm just curious.

oz



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by andy1033
reply to post by rcwj1975
 


The police have desperately tried to frame me for 18 years for anything, here in london. My dna has nothing to do with this, they know i have never done anything, they did some sort of minority report tech rubbish on me. They just made it up, and they made sure i could never have a life.

Its amazing if you have the wrong nutcases investigating your life, does not matter if you never do anything, they just set out to get you forever, like my life has proved.

My dna has nothing to do with this, they have gone through my whole life, and cannot find anything.

I would say there must of been plenty like me, but they may of been framed by these scum, and they got away with it. The only concelation i had over last 18 years is that i knew they where just desperate to ruin my life.

I could of too been like this person, and there must be many more. Without ever commiting a crime, police can just do anything they want to
you.


The topic of this thread is about DNA and it setting an innocent man free -because there was not the technology and staff for this 30 years ago.

Please read the thread and understand - this happened 30 years ago before there was the ability to test DNA against a database and against evidence collected at a crime scene.



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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That's such a travesty of justice. Modern science is good for something. Unless it's a limited window of opportunity on DNA testing, we will be okay. What happens if all the DNA-altering substances change that, and over, say, ten years an individual has DNA altered so much that two samples no longer match?

Food for thought.

What food do they feed people in prison comes to mind ... GMo's? I'm not trying to say this man is actually guilty, but what about the future? If they threw innocents in jail, messed with their DNA over time, then they could also allow parole prosecutors to argue that their DNA is now inadmissable evidence. That's a scary thought.

[edit on 7-5-2010 by Northwarden]



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by oozyism
 


As was said earlier - the chance of this happening NOW and in the future is much much much less than 30 years ago. Forensics today is nothing what it was 20-30 years ago. Procedures for collecting and processing evidence today is nothing like it was 20-30 years ago. There are very strict procedures on collecting evidence, handing over evidence, processing in a lab, keeping notes, etc. And if it is not done properly - it wont stand up in court - OJSimpson case prime example.

The knowledge about matching DNA, ways of testing and so on has grown so much over the years.

And as RCWJ said above - a suspect has to be willing to give a DNA sample to match against the CODIS database and any evidence collected at a crime scene.


[edit on May 7th 2010 by greeneyedleo]



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 12:40 AM
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Spending 30 years in perpetual punishment for a crime you didn't commit sounds like one of the worst things somebody can experience. Even if he ends up getting millions of dollars...the permanent psychological damage he has sustained as a result of this ordeal cannot be measured.

A question for those in the know: out of curiosity, if this guy decides to apply for a job which on the application asks if he has committed a crime/or served time in jail, will he need to say that he has? How does the process work in this regard?



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 02:24 AM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


No, not really.

The man was railroaded by police and prosecutors who helped frame him for their own personal or political reasons that we can only speculate at this point. Likely self promotion, greed & perhaps bigotry and the fact that they knew they could get away with it. Just because there's DNA today doesn't mean that those who run the system can't get away with putting innocent people away - it just takes more skill.

The counties usually fight tooth & nail to keep already convicted (convicts) from getting their DNA tested and many never get the chance.

This guy was lucky because the bigots who framed him didn't know that someday their evidence would be used to free him.

RCW makes the claim that all everyone has to do is provide them with DNA, but they fact is if it doesn't help the police or prosecutors they often overlook that fact. Besides if they suspect somebody - it's not that hard to obtain a sample. The idea that everybody should be considered a suspect until proven innocent by taking a test is an un-American, perhaps treasonous idea.

Today all they have to do is discretely plant DNA or cross contaminate a crime scene like we saw the Italians do to Amanda Knox which is much easier than planting fingerprints or other evidence.

I'm happy for the man that he is finally free. Curious how many years prosecutors fought to keep his DNA from being tested.

[edit on 7-5-2010 by verylowfrequency]



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