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Cat tries to "revive" her friend

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posted on May, 4 2010 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by the.lights

You've just blown your argument right out of the water with your petty jibes and infantile digs. I'm way above trading insults with your kind of personality type.
It's people like you and your kind of arrogance towards animals, and assumption that only humans have any higher form of intelligence, emotions or behaviours, that defies belief.


Wah wah wah. How dare I question what you believe on faith alone, beliefs that fly in the face of 30+ years of ethology studies and findings. Yes, I'm so arrogant, because I can't understand your "special love bond" with your furry friends. Your position has overwhelm me to simply accept your beliefs based on anecdotal evidence alone. Yes, cats are just as intelligent as humans, as are guinea pigs and guppies and frogs and worms and parasites and that common cold "thang."



For the record, I have nine years worth of memories of joy, happiness, laughter and love all thanks to my pet cat and six months of the same so far from my pet puppy - real, tangible and demonstrative evidence of highly complex emotions, love and thought processes. That's all the proof or validation I need - not the highly assumptive, opinionated ramblings of some nameless, faceless internet account.
You are the one who is deluded.


Yes, you believe you saw something, something that you are already presuming is the correct answer (and defying all facts and study) and your evidence is that what, you feel something special with your little kitty cat? If that's all the proof you need, I feel sorry for you, because I'm sure you'll age into those poor old geriatrics in some Florida retirement community who gets conned every other week by a sweet mustached man with a kind smile and a southern twang who's got a very low risk business deal for you.

I just believe when half a decades worth of animal behavior study has conclusively, time and time again, tested the relative intelligence capacity of animals that maybe we should give credence to the research that they have done. I mean, I just prefer to follow actual science and evidence over your anecdotal 'special love bond" with a small feline who's brain is the size of a baseball. Yeah, that makes me the one who's deluded.




posted on May, 4 2010 @ 06:26 PM
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So sad to see that, for any cat lover this is hard to watch...



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by sandri_90
 


A very touching video and something I've believed in from a very very young age. Animals always care for their siblings and loved ones, I've seen it from animal to human after a few tragic happenings. I'm happy you posted this although it made me shead a few tears. I'll finish with a quote, "We are one, We are all... No matter how furry our Paws.".



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 08:29 PM
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There's some really sweet videos in here.

First the poor kitty trying to revive her dead friend. I found it difficult to watch and more so skimmed over it.

The story of the gorilla and his kitten All Ball. That was sweet.

And the elephant and the dog. Reminded me almost of a Pixar movie, except obviously non-animated and real.



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by FlightOfTheNavigator

Originally posted by Beast Of Gevaudan

Originally posted by FlightOfTheNavigator
reply to post by clay2 baraka
 


LOL the car is still on the cats tail while they where filming it thats classic!


Idiot. How about we park a car on your foot and see how amusing you find it.


Pretty amused since I would still be alive! (unlike the victim in the video)

[edit on 4-5-2010 by FlightOfTheNavigator]


WTF? You'd be amused? An object weighing over a tonne is crushing your foot and you'd be amused?
Lol, ok then.



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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reply to post by WolfofWar
 


Yes, there are behavioural traits, but how do you think pets are able to learn tricks, responses etc without displaying some level of intelligence? Huh? What's that? Oh, that's simply "primitive" ingrained behavioural instincts at work, no intelligence here right?

Give it a rest buddy.

[edit on 4-5-2010 by Beast Of Gevaudan]



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by Beast Of Gevaudan
reply to post by WolfofWar
 


Yes, there are behavioural traits, but how do you think pets are able to learn tricks, responses etc without displaying some level of intelligence? Huh? What's that? Oh, that's simply "primitive" ingrained behavioural instincts at work,
[edit on 4-5-2010 by Beast Of Gevaudan]


I know it's hard to comprehend in your apparent "all or nothing" mindset, but being intelligent is different than having intelligence. A better term would be complexity. Humans, with a well developed frontal lobe, has the ability for very complex intelligence. Dogs, cats, gerbils, frogs, and guppies all have very underdeveloped areas that would be used for complex intelligence, they rely on simple intelligence. Ethological studies have determined that both cats and dogs have a relative intelligence with each other, and that their complex intelligence is about on part with a 2-3 year old child.

Understand and comprehend before you babble. Oh, and give it a rest.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by clay2 baraka
 


The first time I watched this I felt like crying. I have more emotions for animals than humans sometimes because of their purity.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by WolfofWar

Ethological studies have determined that both cats and dogs have a relative intelligence with each other, and that their complex intelligence is about on part with a 2-3 year old child.


Based on the things I have read about animals, particularly dogs and cats is that this statement is accurate. Like a child, dogs and cats are eager to learn, but they have limits and are by no means dumb. I'm a cat person myself and teaching a kitten how to open doors for example is kind of like teaching a child. You can even train a cat to use the toilet instead of a litter box, so, certainly not dumb animals by any means and are eager to learn with some patience.

Having said that, does a child not mourn if one of his parents die? Sure, the child may not understand what death is, but that doesn't change that the child mourns the absence of his or her parent. You don't need to understand death to experience loss and to mourn that loss. I have read numerous articles and studies showing that animals such as elephants, wolves, chimps, dogs and cats all mourn the dead. When observed, they act depressed. A pack of wolves who lost a member act differently for weeks. For example, they howl separately instead of as a pack and will return to the place their friend died with their tail between their legs and ears down which usually means submission. Chimps, dogs and cats all show signs of depression such as not eating or drinking, returning to the place their friend died or a place the friend frequented often looking for him. A chimp even starved himself to death waiting at the place it's friend died for her to come back and died there waiting. Dolphins was even observed mourning after it failed to save a human child from drowning. A mother seal mourning the loss of her babies as they are killed by predators right in front of her. There are numerous examples of animals mourning the loss of other animals and I'll never be convinced that animals feel nothing when an animal they are attached to dies.

As far as the cat in the video, I got the impression that it was trying to get a response from the dead cat. I've never seen a cat curl up next to another cat and lay it's head down on the other cat as a ritual of mating. Something else was going on there and I don't believe for a second that the cat couldn't tell the other one was dead especially considering it is a predator and is programmed to know the difference. Cats wouldn't mourn the death of prey because what does it care? It has no attachment to it other than it looks good to eat, but these cats obviously did not share a predator/prey relationship.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by Informativeme
 


Yup, those animals sure are pure, with their necrophilia (as apparent with OPs video) and their adorable infanticide and of course all that pure blood-soaked hunting of other animals. We could learn something from animals.


[edit on 5-5-2010 by WolfofWar]



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:39 PM
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It is certainly true that most animals, cats included, lack what could be called "strong" intelligence, and that all animals appear, based on available research, to have "weaker" intelligence than humans posses by orders of magnitude. It is also certainly true that animals, including cats, are governed more by instinct, impulse, and sensation than are humans (although we are certainly also governed by these factors to a large extent.)

With all of that having been said however, it is also clear that many animals - including cats - do experience neurological states we can liken to the equivalent emotion, but without the conscious awareness and contemplation thereof that we as humans experience. They certainly do not understand, think about, or even always acknowledge necessarily, those states, but they do experience them. We know that some of those emotional states appear to demonstrate equivalents of both grief and empathy in certain animals.

So while it is not factually correct to anthropomorphize those states, we can still hypothesize that the cat in the video in question might be experiencing grief. The cat's behavior is unusual, in that cats will typically react with fear or avoidance to death, even the death of an animal they have become well socialized with over long periods of time. It is of course possible that the cat is old or that its senses are otherwise dulled to the presence of a corpse next to it. It's also possible that the cat was not definitively dead yet I suppose.

Either way, it is at least conceivable that the cat was experiencing the feline equivalent of grief. Whether that correlates to being the cause of its actions, we can't know. As human beings, we are capable of cross-species empathy and the contemplation of emotional states experienced by animals which lack sapience of the sort we posses. It isn't at all surprising or upsetting to me that this video provokes strong emotions.

It certainly did for me.


[edit on 5/5/2010 by AceWombat04]



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by Kratos1220
 


Just quickly, no, a 2 year old or 3 year old does not mourn for a lost family member. It may emulate somebody elses emotions using our natural empathy (it's how we learn) but if a 3 year old were to watch it's grandmother die in her sleep on a couch, without any external interference, they would have no concept that anything occurred at all.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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I've been a cat person my whole life. Always had at least one cat. They are phenomenal companions and very sensitive to their surroundings. This doesn't surprise me at all. Quite charming in a sad way.

I've said in the past that once we've destroyed the planet to the point that we can no longer live here, the cats will be the next ones to take the planet over. They have all that they need to do it. They're smart, intuitive, caring, nasty when they have to be and don't forget their defenses.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 09:51 PM
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For people who want to read a little about cat intelligence and how a cat's brain works, check this out. I read this like a year ago and kept it in bookmarks because it's interesting. Give it a read.





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