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Warning: Why your Internet might fail on May 5

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posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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Warning: Why your Internet might fail on May 5


www.itnews.com.au

Network managers are being urged to run a series of checks on their routers and firewalls to ensure their users will still be able to connect to internet sites in the wake of a major change to the internet's domain name system next week.

On May 5, the world's top domain authorities (led by ICANN, the US Government and Verisign) will complete the first phase of the roll-out of DNSSEC (Domain Name System Security Extensions) across the 13 root servers that direct user requests to the relevant websites on the internet.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:

www.slashdot.org
www.theregister.co.uk

[edit on 1-5-2010 by xmaddness]



+12 more 
posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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This thread is a preemptive strike against those who are going to try and sensationalize the stories that will be spread that "TPTB are purposely trying to stop us from communicating!!! Its the end of the world!!!".

Also, Just so if you are part of the small percentage that may be affected, you do not freak out.

My only hope is that this reaches people in time!

The root DNS servers are being upgraded with some new protocols and some older network switches and routers may not be able to handle the new system. This may cause some outages and slowing of some networks around the world, but alas as they become updated and/or replaced, stability will return to the Internet.

So if you, and what seems like a lot of others, are having issues with the internet on May 5th, it is not due to any of the following:


  • a false flag attack
  • the end of the world
  • an alien invasion
  • a separate dimension colliding with ours
  • Niburu
  • A black hole from the LHC
  • A massive coronal mass ejection from the sun
  • NWO takeover
  • HARRP
  • 2012 Mayan Calendar
  • Global Warming
  • Global Cooling
  • Chemtrails side effect
  • Chinese Hackers




My question to you ATS!

If you had not seen this thread, and you and many around you lost the internet, what would you think happened?


Let see what you can come up with ATS!


I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.





www.itnews.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 2-5-2010 by xmaddness]



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by xmaddness
 


I have a 2008 Sprint datacard, will it be affected?

If I or anyone experiences affects how long exactly can we expect it to last until we are back to normal?



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:40 PM
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www.dslreports.com...


Upgrading to DNSSEC is a slow and measured affair that's only just really getting off the ground, and despite The Register's claims that the Internet may grind to a halt next Wednesday -- all 13 root servers upgraded with DNSSEC next week will behave normally to end users whether your ISP is fully prepared or not (and most certainly aren't). However there is a small problem that could slow the Internet down slightly for a very small portion of users, as "El Reg" explores:

Normal DNS traffic uses the UDP protocol, which is faster and less resource-hungry than TCP. Normal DNS UDP packets are also quite small, under 512 bytes. Because of this, some pieces of network gear are configured out of the box to reject any UDP packet over 512 bytes on the basis that it's probably broken or malicious. Signed DNSSEC packets are quite a lot bigger that 512 bytes, and from 5 May all the DNS root servers will respond with signed DNSSEC answers.

Kind of -- except for the fact that as we understand it -- root servers will only return signed DNSSEC answers to queries that have explicitly asked for them. In other words? The vast majority of Internet users won't notice a damn thing next week.

Keith Mitchell, head of engineering at root server operator Internet Systems Consortium, takes issue with the very Register article he's quoted in. "No-one is going to completely lose Internet service as a result of the signed root -- or indeed any DNSSEC deployment efforts -- and I certainly didn't say that," he says. "The worst that is going to happen is that a tiny minority of users behind mis-configured firewall or middleware boxes may experience some performance degradation when their clients have to attempt alternative paths for resolving names," says Mitchell of the May 5 upgrade.



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by xmaddness
 


Thanks for the heads up. Now maybe I won't call my provider that day asking why I have to pay them but they don't give the service.


But you didn't rule out a time-shift!!! OMGZ it's really a time-shift isn't it?!?
OH NO!But now maybe Australia and NZ will "go back to the right place".

j/k



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 10:41 PM
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So this is just a power surge because ET will be calling home?
How long will this slow down period be--24 hrs.?
What are the "new protocols"---GPS tracking links?



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by Misoir
 




I have a 2008 Sprint datacard, will it be affected?


Let's say a plumber shuts off the water to your house for an hour while he checks a pipe. You use Pantene shampoo. The standard formula, not the ones for dry/damaged hair, or for preserving hair dye, or anything like that. Just the standard formula.

Will your shampoo be affected by the water being shut off?



I have a 2008 Sprint datacard, will it be affected?


The correct answer is "no."

A slightly more useful, but somewhat condescending answer would be "only if you use it to connect to the internet."

A still more useful, and more polite answer would be "it's possible you might lose access to the internet for a while. But probably not."



If I or anyone experiences affects how long exactly can
we expect it to last until we are back to normal?


It's very likely that you will experience no downtime. It's possible you may lose connection for five or ten minutes while an admin reboots a system. Or they might take advantage of it as an opportunity to schedule some maintenance downtime, and you might be out for a couple hours. It's also possible that something will go horribly wrong and a couple million people may lose their connection for a day or two.

But most likely, the vast majority of people won't notice any difference.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:12 AM
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Wow. You'd think they'd be plastering this all over bobble head news, but why waste a good opportunity for paranoia, especially with all the other topics in the news right now? :\

OH Heyelll! What a minute! WHAT day does ATS 2010 come out again?!?



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:17 AM
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Well I think this is balogna cause what is a name, let alone a domain name. Besides Y2K was supposedly 20x worse then this could ever be.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:17 AM
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I wouldn't freak out if this would happen to my internet connection. I would assume that the internet is just down and it will be up whenever. I'll probably end up doing something else a little more useful than using the internet.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:23 AM
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No way man this is just government disinformation to distract us while they download spying software to every computer world wide...


Having said that things are notorious for happening while there was some supposed routine maintenance, change, or training exercise going on simultaneously...



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:25 AM
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Originally posted by xmaddness

My question to you ATS! If you had not seen this thread, and you and many around you lost the internet, what would you think happened?



I would have assumed the machines had gained consciousness and were seizing control of all our essential services and the internet in preparation for enslaving us and/or making batteries out of us a la the Matrix.

But oh no............you had to go and ruin it for us all with a logical explanation.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:45 AM
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well, did u even read the freaking page you just posted ?

Some Internet users, especially those inside corporations and behind smaller ISPs, may experience intermittent problems. The reason is that some older networking equipment is preconfigured to block any reply to a DNS request that exceeds 512 bytes in size. DNSSEC replies are typically four times as large.

corporations that have their OWN equipment may have problems to access some websites

and few ISPs that are so small that they use some freaky outdated structure

thats just our great journalism trying to get everyone scared ...

you can check here if you are fine or not

labs.ripe.net...

its safe its from the article ... just run this application

Home users using residential hubs should not panic if these tests return scary results. According to Mitchell, it currently only matters that the ISP supports DNSSEC. A dodgy Netgear box is not enough to kill your internet

[edit on 2-5-2010 by Faiol]



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:47 AM
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Got charter and my internet goes out once a week. I think nothing of it. I only worry if I can't get it up and running again.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 08:05 AM
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reply to post by Faiol
 


Yes I did and I am very well aware of what happens and how the Internets routing system works. However, I am also aware of the fact that we are all human, and mistake can and do happen. Any time you are updating any critical systems, such as the main root DNS servers, there is always the possibility of unintended consequences. In software engineering we call them emergent properties, and they can only be seen once the system has been assembled.

Case in point.


www.wired.com
January 15, 1990 -- AT&T Network Outage. A bug in a new release of the software that controls AT&T's #4ESS long distance switches causes these mammoth computers to crash when they receive a specific message from one of their neighboring machines -- a message that the neighbors send out when they recover from a crash.

One day a switch in New York crashes and reboots, causing its neighboring switches to crash, then their neighbors' neighbors, and so on. Soon, 114 switches are crashing and rebooting every six seconds, leaving an estimated 60 thousand people without long distance service for nine hours. The fix: engineers load the previous software release.


As you can see, even the best engineers at the time, which had all the best intentions, did not see the emergent properties until the system was fully in place.

The same could happen here and I felt it necessary for those in the community to at least know about it.

You would also be surprised by how many services on the internet rely on old legacy corporate switches that may fail. Services that may in fact effect a good number of internet sites, information portals, iPhone Apps, etc.

It simply one of those situations where you plan for the worst and hope for the best.


Besides: It very clearly states in the topic "Warning: Why your Internet might fail on May 5".

Might, being the key word.

[edit on 2-5-2010 by xmaddness]



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by xmaddness
This thread is a preemptive strike against those who are going to try and sensationalize the stories that will be spread that "TPTB are purposely trying to stop us from communicating!!! Its the end of the world!!!".

So if you, and what seems like a lot of others, are having issues with the internet on May 5th, it is not due to any of the following:


  • a false flag attack
  • the end of the world
  • an alien invasion
  • a separate dimension colliding with ours
  • Niburu
  • A black hole from the LHC
  • A massive coronal mass ejection from the sun
  • NWO takeover
  • HARRP
  • 2012 Mayan Calendar
  • Global Warming
  • Global Cooling
  • Chemtrails side effect
  • Chinese Hackers



edit on 2-5-2010 by xmaddness]


Thank you, Sunstein, for your preemptive attempts at keeping my opinions "reasonable" . I always appreciate that from my fellow conspiracists, I don't get that enough in the real world.

The same people who control the May 5th changeover date, also would control the date of a false flag, sooo, that could potentially have everything to do with someone's computer problems.

It's a damn shame everyone tries to make everything separate and unrelated. Kind of disempowering, don't you think?




posted on May, 2 2010 @ 10:24 AM
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Niburu!!!! NOOOOOOOO!!!!! I'ms too young to die! I had lots of things left to do on tha internets! Like that 2 girls 1 cup vid and posting that nutshot clip on Break. Whatever shall I's do now?
I know. I can learn how to use spellcheck before we go.


[edit on 2-5-2010 by djvexd]

[edit on 2-5-2010 by djvexd]



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by xmaddness
 


Thanks, ATS is stupifying people just as news papers do with their misleading article headlines.

Stop this rubbish



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by misteRee
 


And exactly what rubbish are you referring to?

The fact is that there are many more legacy switches on the internet that may effect this transition. I do not see how the title is misleading either.

It clearly says "MIGHT" fail. It certainly does not say it "WILL" fail.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by xmaddness
 


How do we know you are not a paid Disinfo Agent trying to desensitise us to the Internet outage that is "expected" this May the 5th?

[edit on 2/5/2010 by Dark Ghost]



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