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Young Aussie genius whipping NASA in Moon Hoax Debate!

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posted on May, 29 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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NO ..............i want a stright answer ~!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Like yes outer space is a VACUUM...........and yes, even the slightest crack of the 'hatch' would depressurize the damm cabin...................

YES OR NO~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




posted on May, 29 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


Did you do any research, at all, into the procedure for de-pressurizing the crew cabin, of the LM?

Do you, based on how you phrased it, believe they just opened the hatch, while pressurized?

Do understand the concept of a door designed to be held closed, BY pressurization? Have you ever paid attention to an airliners cabin door (Sometimes referred to as a "plug"-type door), and how it works? (that's a hint...so is the word "plug").



edit on Sun 29 May 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by Komodo
WELL.. yea.. it is a chestnut because it's hard to crack .........and there's one thing missing in 'cracking the hatch'.........

a) you've just depressurized the cabin and let all the oxygen OUT, to include any normal temperature that is needed to either stay warm OR cool to survive...

b) I guess they strapped in, locked themselves in, all their notes and EVERYTHING was locked down because if not it went BYE BYE right out the HATCH~!~!!!!!!

c) Now that they've depressurized the cabin to neutral state, meaning NO oxy, no heat (presumably which is completely far fetched IMO,) they have to spend precious Oxy back to a state where they can breath w/o suits on .. correct ?? which means they have limited their oxygen in their suits down to where they can not use them any more since they used them floating to the LM and staying their for 3 hon their

Yes ... or NO ..?

A) I've addressed the heat issue. Depressurizing the craft doesn't suddenly make the heat stored in the internal surfaces and components rush out.

B) The depressurization was done through a valve, slowly. You couldn't open the hatch with any significant pressure differential.

C) Yes, the cabin would be repressurized after each EVA. Not sure how that "limits" time in the suits. The PLSSs were recharged from the LM oxygen stores for each EVA.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 05:35 PM
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Yes of course they needed to depressurize the craft to go out on an EVA. How else would they exit the craft?



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 06:51 PM
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posted on May, 30 2011 @ 03:53 AM
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Originally posted by nataylor
Yes of course they needed to depressurize the craft to go out on an EVA. How else would they exit the craft?


Let me ask the following to see if its true.
Sublimation of the PLSS only worked in a vacuum correct?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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So, what's happened in the time-span of my absence? From the looks of it, it looks like neither side has budged and therefore nothing has changed.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by FoosM
 


Specifically, the sublimation was dependent on the outside temperature and pressure being below the triple point of water.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by Komodo
WELL.. yea.. it is a chestnut because it's hard to crack .........and there's one thing missing in 'cracking the hatch'.........

a) you've just depressurized the cabin and let all the oxygen OUT, to include any normal temperature that is needed to either stay warm OR cool to survive...

b) I guess they strapped in, locked themselves in, all their notes and EVERYTHING was locked down because if not it went BYE BYE right out the HATCH~!~!!!!!!
No it wouldn't. IIRC, the inside of the cabin was at equilibrium. There was no sort of air rushing out. They used a valve to depressurize.


c) Now that they've depressurized the cabin to neutral state, meaning NO oxy, no heat (presumably which is completely far fetched IMO,) they have to spend precious Oxy back to a state where they can breath w/o suits on .. correct ?? which means they have limited their oxygen in their suits down to where they can not use them any more since they used them floating to the LM and staying their for 3 hours..

Yes ... or NO ..?
You do know there were oxygen tanks in the Service Module, right? The big round thing attached to the bottom of the CM? You really should spend five seconds Googling before shooting your mouth off. It is entirely possible they simply made plans for the oxygen loss.


Originally posted by ruserious8D
So, what's happened in the time-span of my absence? From the looks of it, it looks like neither side has budged and therefore nothing has changed.
I proved Jarrah wrong on something, and certain parties pretended that post didn't exist. Nor have any of my subsequent links to it.

So, nothing unusual.
edit on 2011/5/30 by 000063 because: +



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by 000063
 



I proved Jarrah wrong on something, and certain parties pretended that post didn't exist. Nor have any of my subsequent links to it.


Don't forget I proved Phil Plait lies..
That's important also..



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by backinblack
 


details please



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by nataylor
reply to post by FoosM
 


Specifically, the sublimation was dependent on the outside temperature and pressure being below the triple point of water.




"Aldrin tried to curl up on the floor of the LEM, only to discover that he was too
"Elated" and also too "cold" to sleep during the astronauts schedule seven-hour rest
period before lunar take-off As he reported afterward, "The thing which really kept us
awake was the temperature. It was very chilly in there. After about three hours it became
unbearable. We had the liquid cooling system in operation in our suits, of course, and we
tried to get comfortable by turning the water circulation down to a minimum. That didn't
help much. We turned the temperature control on our oxygen system up to the
maximum. That didn't have much effect either. We could have raised the window shades
and let the light in to warm us, but that would have destroyed any remaining possibility
of sleeping.""


p. 185, FOR ALL MANKIND, "Hurt", 1988, Atlantic Monthly Press

They are in the LM, they are using the suits to keep cool...
Why? And, How are their suits working in a normal environment?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by FoosM
 


On Apollo 11, they stayed in their suits while in the LM, just taking off their helmets and gloves. Since the suits were well insulated, they would have gotten too hot inside them without cooling.

While inside the LM in their suits, they were not wearing the PLSSs, though. Those were only for use outside. Inside the LM, they could hook their suits into the LM's cooling system. Thus, their cooling would come from the LM's sublimators, not the PLSS's.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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We could have raised the window shades
and let the light in to warm us,


How was this not an option on Apollo 13?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by FoosM
 


The windows of the CM would have to be angled to allow direct sunlight from the sun to get in. Perhaps the craft was not oriented in such a manner to allow that. If direct sunlight was not coming in through the window, taking the shade off would just allow another place for heat inside the capsule to radiate out. As it states in the transcript:


03 20 50 51 CC Roger, Fred. Copy that. Is it a little chilly up there?

03 20 50 58 LMP Yes. We made the mistake of putting up the window shades, which we won't do again; and with this powered-down mode, we're not generating much internally, and it really did get chilly.

edit on 30-5-2011 by nataylor because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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What I_A says. I think I missed that.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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This is a short film clip of Buzz Aldrin, shot in eagle, during a cislunar LM checkout.


Why in so many Apollo videos do we see blue light coming from the windows?
When we expect to see the darkness of space?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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But Apollo 13 was rotating.
And if it wasnt rotating why couldnt they simply rotate it to have sunlight come through the windows?



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by FoosM
 


Right, if it's rotating, then it would be hard to keep the sun in any one window for any amount of time.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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here is some Apollo 13 footage.


Now notice that intense bright light coming through.
If they are rotating, I suppose its pretty slow.
But that light should be warm according to the crew of Apollo 11.

Here are some more shots.
I see light coming through




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