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Belgium Bans Burka-Type Dress in Public

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posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 06:40 PM
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Belgium Bans Burka-Type Dress in Public


news.aol.ca

Belgium's lower house of parliament on Thursday banned burka-type Islamic dress in public, but the measure faces a challenge in the Senate which will delay early enactment of the law.

Christian Democrats and Liberals in the Senate questioned the phrasing of the law, which holds no one can appear in public "with the face fully or partly covered so as to render them no longer unrecognizable."

Approval in the lower house was almost unanimous.

Like elsewhere in Europe, Belgium struggles
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 06:40 PM
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This is good
I am not against this
Although it pushes on freedom of choice kind of
it is one extremely gray matter
on the other side of the coin it pushes on freedom period

Too many women are forced to wear this
and also in countries that follow the rule of law i'm surprised it took them that long

terroists threats or not, there's always crime
but then that begs the question....

what about a town full of people wearing ski masks somewhere in Alaska during the winter season?

A very gray matter

on another note

France has the largest Muslim population

Why France?

news.aol.ca
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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All religious symbolism should be removed from a persons physical identity, when in public.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 07:47 PM
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I bet any money that the muslims who are opposing this dont follow their own rules/guidelines for their religion spot on.
Which is fair play really because it simply isnt practical to follow a religion word for word.
So, when this ban is enforced, surely the act of wearing a burka will no longer be practical (unless of course you happen to have a fairly large amount of cash set aside for paying the fines you'll accumulate), and so therefore nothing to get emotional about.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by ghostsoldier
All religious symbolism should be removed from a persons physical identity, when in public.



Says who?
I would like for someone to try and make me remove
any religious symbols off my person!
The fact is,I don't wear jewelry.The only symbols of
my faith would be that I dress modestly.I wear skirts
and dresses down to my ankles.I wear loose fitting tops
and comfortable shoes.
When you are overweight,the loose fitting tops can really
hide a lot



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by ghostsoldier
 


It never ceases to amaze me when people who claim to love freedom are willing to take others' freedom away.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
reply to post by ghostsoldier
 


It never ceases to amaze me when people who claim to love freedom are willing to take others' freedom away.


Yes, some concepts are hard to understand. Try harder. Oh, by the way, do you have the freedom to drink and drive?



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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I wonder how they are going to enforce this, what will be the punishment? a fine? having to appear in court?.

That just reminded me of a story I read in a newspaper some time ago, a woman in a burkha complained about a busdriver who asked her to unveil her face so he could check that she was infact the person on her busspass, she was insulted and angry at this request, i thought that was stupid as the busdriver had a fair point, she was using a busspass that would grant her free travel so of course he had a right to check she was the same person pictured on the pass.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


Nice deflection. Freedom of religion is one of the basic tenets of every free country



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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Well this should allow for the many Islamic women trapped in the shackles of tradition to break free. Though they will never mention of it publicly for fear of repercussion.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by ghostsoldier
 




All religious symbolism should be removed from a persons physical identity, when in public.

Yeah. This is great idea. However why stop at religious symbolism? I think that obligatory uniform would do wonders for health of society. With technological advance we also will be able to remove all difference in individual appearance and complection. Society of identical mono-creatures will be the ultimate monument of real personal freedom.
And seriously speaking, i have real issues with this law. Clearly if people/society force women to wear it against her will - this law is big help for her. But if she really really wants to wear it - then this is her right. Just as Muslims in Belgium cannot force dress codes on rest of unwilling society, there is no excuse to force dress code on REALLY unwilling Muslim individuals.
I think that this is only expression of fear from religious intolerance of Muslim fanatics, but in reality they are minority among Muslims.
Also i doubt that this law will lower the tensions, actually it will ignite it even further. There will be burqa "martyrs" and anti-burqa crowds and even if it will help lots of women, it might also hurt (directly or indirectly) lots of women too.

[edit on 19-5-2010 by ZeroKnowledge]



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