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I give you Mimas; Broken Domes and a Hook

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posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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Dear ATS members, I'd like to share with you my findings upon looking at one of Mimas's new picture.
So without delay, here are the extracted details of Mimas's Death Star Ray rim ( ! )...



I call this one Broken Domes, Squares and beams. Next.



This one I call the Hook. For a while, I thought that part of the rim of the hook was hidden by a mass of land, but I just found a 3D view of Mimas that shows EXACTLY the same object in clear details. Here's the link:

msnbcmedia.msn.com...

I could find this one through the link on Anon72's thread "Saturns Death Star in detail (great pics)" Thanks Anon72!


The two pictures were taken from this one: www.nasa.gov...

Go have fun, now! A lot has been blurred, but we can still make a lot of details out. Search for the crater with a 90 degree corner in the bottom right. The pictures have been rotated 180 degrees. On the 3D view as much as for the link for pia12569, you will have to look at the bottom right of the clear image.

I hope you appreciate,

Aresh

[edit on 29-4-2010 by Aresh Troxit]

[edit on 29-4-2010 by Aresh Troxit]




posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


These are beautiful pics.

Sorry to sound ignorant, but what is Mimas? Is it a moon or something else?



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by pablos
 


LOL Sorry, I forgot to say. Yes, Mimas is a moon of Saturn. I found out recently, being a Moon or Mars kind a guy!


Aresh



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:33 PM
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that is a big crater on he side of mimas. i wonder what it must have looked like for the planet?



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Well, looking at the image of Mimas in 3D, it looks like the moon was still "tender" when hit. Around the impact site, the land is distributed in a manner similar as when you put your shoe in mud. It raises around your foot but doesn't crack. And there does not seem to be major fractures due to the size of the impact, like we see on Uranus's Miranda.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:37 AM
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Honestly I could sit and stare at this high resolution photo for hours.

I really wish half of it wasn't blurry. I guess they did not have the ability to get really good pics of the whole thing.


I have never seen Mimas up close and this is a fascinating moon.

I also find the lack of major fractures in the surrounding landscape to be quite the anomaly.

The impact is cataclysmic sized, so I just cannot wrap my head around how it did not cause larger destruction.

The crater is also quite old as there are many small craters within it.

Two (maybe 3) of the craters I see, do not match the shadowing of the other craters. It makes me think it is a hill, or 'dome' as you said in your OP.

If you compare the shadows of all the craters, you will see that 2 or 3 of these are actually indeed dome shaped hills or something. This is fascinating as almost all of the other craters have shadowing on the opposite sides.

I will be looking at the high resolution photo much closer. If I find anything I will for sure post and point out what I discover.



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 01:50 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Yes, I noticed also the domes around the crater. And found unusual too the fact that the rim was moved as if it was mud, or wet ( maybe more in a molten state ) at the time of impact.
It would have been nice indeed to see the whole of the moon. But what we see is promising.

But the hook and broken domes with beams in it made me think one thing; have ALL bodies of the system been visited? The traces on Earth, on the Moon, Mars, etc.
And the picture is really nice too. The 3D one is also very; I use the kids goggle with the red and blue glasses...


What I like about the picture of the broken domes is the shadow the one in the bottom left casts on the floor. And it looks like a grey shadow despite the intense lighting. Something made of glass maybe?


[edit on 2-5-2010 by Aresh Troxit]

[edit on 2-5-2010 by Aresh Troxit]



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


Mimas is one of those moons that doesn't get much press. Images like that remind me how far we've come in so little time. We've gone from the Wright Brothers to landing on the moon to taking hi-res images of Saturn's moons in a little over a century.

Not sure what the big deal about that hook is other than it being an interesting shape. Nature creates many complex shapes and patterns, we humans think we're so smart but most of the shapes we use nature used way before us. Thanks for bringing this pics to our attention and here's to future space exploration



posted on May, 2 2010 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by Titen-Sxull
 


Well, for one, regarding the domes, broken or not, visible in the pics, coupled with the fact the impact site seemed muddy, these domes might just be bubbles, but on a scale that might be novel, don't you think?

I didn't know Mimas prior to seeing these pictures, and it is fascinating to look at. And the hook, if only by its size, too, is a rather impressive feat by nature, given the context in which it was born.
IF natural, of course... heh heh



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


I don't see any domes, only craters.

Where in that big image are those areas?

PS: Mimas is just one example of an interesting place that is yet to be explored as it should.


PPS: I didn't forget about this thread, better late than never.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Those are broken domes. You can still see the curvature of the structure on the one bottom right of the pic. It casts shadows on the crater floor.

The big impact seems to have happened when the moon was still limp. It might have created bubbles all around the impact site. So they are most likely natural domes, but... when you look carefully, some broken domes are filled with long straight beams.

The domes can be seen easily on the originals all around the big crater. Their highlights and shadows are opposite of the many smaller craters all around.

As for the two posted pics in the OP, you can find them true south on both pics. I rotated them 180 degrees.

Thanks for coming by!

PS: Excuse me, what did you say again about the hook?...


PPS: I didn't know about it before and am glad I do now!

PPPS:
I'll try to post bigger ones as soon as possible.



posted on May, 6 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


I think most of those impacts look like they happened during a time the surface was not completely solid, and those things you call broken domes are craters made by meteors that hit the surface at a low angle, lifting some of the surface material, like in the following image.



The hook may be a result of the ejecta from the large crater or something bigger that was cut by the hit that made that partial crater, marked below with a blue line.




posted on May, 6 2010 @ 09:19 PM
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Well, my dear ArMaP, I promised a bigger shot of the pics, so here's the hook.



As you can see, the hook, straight bar and "ripped tent" ( sorry for the poetic names!
) are not of the same material than the surrounding terrain.

The "landslide" bottom right of the tent is strangely "iso", for a landslide. There's lots of circles and bars to the left.

And more. That I will post soon enough.

[edit on 6-5-2010 by Aresh Troxit]



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 02:49 AM
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Arrow A ( The big one top right ) is direction of light. Arrow B is shadow of hook on lower terrain.
I won't mention Arrow C...


You had it wrong on the rim of the crater.
You put it where it fitted your explanation, but the shadow was a stool!...


Here is a version with the contrast amplified a bit.




posted on May, 7 2010 @ 03:20 AM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


Dome



or Crater




It depends how you look at it



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


LOL Nicely done... That'll teach me for working from memory and too late.

But I know what you mean, sometimes I know I perceive the image in reverse, and it takes me some time to adjust and see it the right way.

Weird and fascinating at the same time...



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 03:48 AM
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reply to post by Aresh Troxit
 


The problem is with this type of thread when pictures are zoomed in you get to a point that you do more harm than good pictures have a resolution limit you can also get lots of problems with pictures re saved many times because you can lose information that way.

Look at some of the other anomoly threads on here and see what I mean.



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 07:45 AM
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Originally posted by Aresh Troxit
You had it wrong on the rim of the crater.
You put it where it fitted your explanation, but the shadow was a stool!...
In your opinion I have the rim of the crater in the wrong place, in my opinion it's in the right place, not because it fits my explanation but because that's how I see it.

And I don't imagine things to fit my explanations, I imagine my explanations, ideas and theories based on what I see.

Also, I do not start by thinking "this is an artificial structure" or "this is a natural structure", I only think about it after looking at photo.

Posting bigger images only helps if they have a higher resolution, if they do not then you are just looking at the way the program you used interpolated the pixel values (unless you use pixel resizing methods).

PS: I had some problems identifying what was a crater and what was a dome, but after some time I suffer much less from that problem. Rotating the images 90º help, because then we (usually) lose the vertical reference created by our brains.



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


I was only kidding you, don't take it so hard!


But seriously, that is what I do too. I look at the pictures and then, when I see something unusual, I'll look more into it. I didn't post everything I found intriguing because sometimes, even if I wished it was artificial, I can see it is not. And sometimes, I find it does, hence this thread!

You can yank my chain once in a while if you feel like it, you deserved that right!...



posted on May, 7 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Yeah, I know, it is a real bummer.

But at the same time, I can't help to wonder why some pics hi-rez versions are 130mb in TIFF format and others are 1.2mb in JPEG... It's as if NASA didn't want us to see some things over there... Unless someone can point me to where we can get only super mega sick hi-rez pics that won't loose or reinterpret data... Sigh!



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