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America: Your Child Does Not Need to Be Two or Three To Be Potty Trained!

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posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by trueperspective
 


Its not possible to force children and even in cloth diapers most children can not do the following sequence, they are not mature enough to: feel it, hold it, and get to the potty.

Most parents start at 2 and yet the average age is stilll 3 and has stayed 3 for a long time, even in my grandparents generation. And its still only an average. I was very young, my mother told me all my life that once I realized what that toilet was for I insisted on using it all the time from 1 year of age up. My brother was 3.

Its the child who potty trains themselves when the neurology is right. There is usually a slightly earlier range for cloth over disposable, and girls are typically younger than boys.




posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by iamnot
 


When did they change the pregnancy to 10 months? Its not, its 9. And at 10, many babies are born with the cord wrapped around its neck. I know of some horrible things that happened when they didn't induce labor on the woman, and only happened to the poor single mothers or native category at that. She may have to switch doctors!



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 09:16 AM
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No kids here...pretty young myself, but when and if I ever do, I would teach my kid to be self sufficient by the age 5


In fact...any time spent with my kid would be having and and teaching it. I guess more parents are worried about letting it suck on its toes watching Dora!



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 09:25 AM
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This is a very interesting post, and i'm sure that both my sons were using the loo before they were 2, and i'm pretty sure my youngest (11 months between them) was using the loo regularly at an earlier age than my eldest, due, I think to seeing his brother use the loo, and wanting to be the same as him. 8 months on the other hand, sounds too good to be true really.

I remember seeing a documentary years ago about the search for "hidden tribes" in the Amazon. The crew stayed in a "known" Indian camp before going on the search, and were amazed to see "toddlers", helping mum prepare food. These kids (3-5 year olds), each has a razor sharp knife and were peeling and chopping vegetables! The thought of giving a razor sharp knife to a toddler makes everyone shudder with dread! But not to the tribe because obviously the kids "know" how to use the knives. Blows my mind to think of it, still to this day!

peace



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Unity, excellent post & I agree 100%. And to another poster above, I agree about the younger ones wanting to do what the older ones do! My younger boys were pretty easy to train also( they were about 2 &1/2 when trained), as they had older siblings.. Never force a child to potty train! I agree with Unity here, it can be very traumatic to the child. Why would you want to put that much stress on a little baby. That child would end up being a nervous wreck in my opinion. Again Unity, we also did the sticker method & it worked out great for the kiddo's!! I would HIGHLY recommend the sticker method & potty book.. Good Luck OP!!



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:07 PM
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My children were "House-Trained" at a very young age, LOL!

In the majority of China and India the "potty" is a hole in the ground. At 8 months, both of my boys knew to take their diaper off and go to the restroom in the grass, but it is a different story when we are inside, or at a restaurant!



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by nunya13
 


Yes, it is wierd but it works. It is harder to retrain their little brains when they have so far spent their entire lives ignoring the signs that they need to go to the toilet. They learn by association, every time they 'go' you quickly put them over the toilet and very quickly they will look to you as soon as they realise the sensation is there and you respond immediately because they don't have the muscle controll to hold it long. Then the ability to hold it improves. One of the best reasons for doing this is to save the landfill. I did it, my daughter didn't poop her pants after five months and stopped wearing the cloth diapers soon after.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
The sphincter muscles, which control the ability to hold on to and let go of fecal
material, do not become fully mature and workable until the average child is between 1 1/2 and 2 years old. The implication of this physical development is that a child will be unable to control bowel movements before the spincters have attained maturation.


Good work. I think you have successfully debunked the claims.

Potty training before sphincter maturation is impossible, by definition.

Anyone who thinks they "trained" their kids before that, is actually doing all of the work for the kid...

Very nice work.

[edit on 29-4-2010 by muzzleflash]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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Originally posted by Myrddin Wyllt
These kids (3-5 year olds), each has a razor sharp knife and were peeling and chopping vegetables! The thought of giving a razor sharp knife to a toddler makes everyone shudder with dread! But not to the tribe because obviously the kids "know" how to use the knives. Blows my mind to think of it, still to this day!

peace


My little girl has been using knives and scissors since around 3.

Key: Supervision

Also, by explaining all of the ways they can get cut, helps scare them into being careful.

Always supervise it though. Because it is dangerous.

Sorry for the offtopic there. Just figured it was relevant to the posters "surprise".



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash

Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
The sphincter muscles, which control the ability to hold on to and let go of fecal
material, do not become fully mature and workable until the average child is between 1 1/2 and 2 years old. The implication of this physical development is that a child will be unable to control bowel movements before the spincters have attained maturation.


Good work. I think you have successfully debunked the claims.

Potty training before sphincter maturation is impossible, by definition.

Anyone who thinks they "trained" their kids before that, is actually doing all of the work for the kid...

Very nice work.

[edit on 29-4-2010 by muzzleflash]


WRONG. The claim of the article is NOT that your child can hold their waste. The point of the article is that your child can learn to communicate that they are about to go....

Just because they can't hold it DOESN'T mean they don't know it's coming. They have the ability to "let you know" that they need to go.

EDIT: Besides all of that, maybe the sphincter muscle doesn't develop because the child never has to use it, or doesn't know they can. I remeber when my younger brother was potty training, he had a hard time holding it...


You know what the doctor said...He told him to start and stop when he was peeing to "WORK" the muscle so that it can hold it better.

Children have to WORK the muscle to know how to hold it. THEY WILL NEVER learn that if they are in diapers!!!

[edit on 29-4-2010 by trueperspective]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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I'm the mom of a daughter adopted from China. We got the same story -that our 16 month old was potty trained - when we went to China to bring her home. So we tried putting her on the toilet with very uneven results. It turns out that the whole potty-trained at incredibly young age means that the kids are sat on the potty and left there for hours on end. Eventually the potty catches some waste. And as for Chinese orphans and diapers - no they aren't used to them, they are used to wearing split seat pants and going whenever and wherever the need overtakes them. Sure - if a parent is home all day they might be able to put the kid on the toilet for long periods of time or even figure out about when the kid needed to go and throw it on the toilet, but that's all you're talking about - not that the kid can effectively communicate that it needs to go to the potty. Young children don't have the muscle control to properly toilet train until they are 2 years old or better.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by calstorm
 


I had the hardest time training my son to go to the bathroom, I started when he was 2, and was asking questions about the toilet. At the age of 2 1/2 I thought he was completely potty trained, then my husband and I had a huge separation, my son refused to sit on the potty, and claimed he would be sucked into the toilet. I asked his doctor about this and she asked if there was any life changes going on, I said I recently separated from my husband. She said she thought my son wasn't potty training because he was stressed.

Then I had to get a job and put my son in daycare, for a whole year he refused to go near a toilet. When he was 3 I tried again unsucessfully. I got back together with my husband my son started sitting using the potty again. I got pregnant, and again he refused to potty train. I was on bedrest for 12 weeks he wouldn't go to the bathroom. It wasn't until a week before he turned 4 that he started using the toilet, he sucessfully went and didn't have any problems after that.

My second child didn't like using the potty I tried when she was 1, because I was told by her doctor to start training, I successfully trained at the age of 3.

My youngest trained herself at the age of 3. She was secretly using the toilet because her sister sat on the same toilet and she would pee. After having numerous dry diapers I put underwear on her and she was fine, she had some accidents at night but other wise was fine. I was relieved when all of them were done potty training and I could carry on with life.

By the way my husband and I are still together we will have been married for 14 years this July.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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"WRONG. The claim of the article is NOT that your child can hold their waste. The point of the article is that your child can learn to communicate that they are about to go....

Just because they can't hold it DOESN'T mean they don't know it's coming. They have the ability to "let you know" that they need to go.

EDIT: Besides all of that, maybe the sphincter muscle doesn't develop because the child never has to use it, or doesn't know they can. I remember when my younger brother was potty training, he had a hard time holding it...


You know what the doctor said...He told him to start and stop when he was peeing to "WORK" the muscle so that it can hold it better.

Children have to WORK the muscle to know how to hold it. THEY WILL NEVER learn that if they are in diapers!!!"


This makes sense to me. All muscles have to be developed over time through use, including the brain. Sadly, too many parents these days use the boob tube as a baby sitter and their children do not exercise their brains as much as they would if the parent used parenting skills.

Of course some of those same parents will get flat indignant if you suggest you might know a way to help them raise their child. It annoys me to no end when I see parents who think that because they gave birth, they are automatically gifted with the wisdom needed to be a great parent, and therefore need no help from anyone. "Don't tell me how to raise my kid!"... etc. I am not sure when it changed from "taking a village to raise a child", to "no one knows better about my kid than me".

People seem to feel that accepting the advice of someone else about child raising means that they are some how a failure or something.

[edit on 29-4-2010 by idontKNOWanything]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by trueperspective
 


Hi. I meant no disrespect for your OP, and think it's really created discussion, which is what a successful thread does.

The spincter muscle is associated with the elimination of fecal matter, and has nothing to do with urination. To ask a small child to "stop and start" the flow of urine, is not going to be helpful in any way. Once he figures out he can do that, he will do it naturally. No need to practice.

I really don't want people reading this information to leave it thinking they can toilet train their eight month old infant. They cannot. You have heard of "oral fixation", anal fixation", "anal retentiveness", and the like.

There are indeed emotional and psychological issues that a person can carry lifelong from poor toilet training practices. To insinuate to a baby it should be able to do something it is both physically and emotionally unable to do can create issues. Lost of self confidence, self esteem, loss of attempts at self-industry, and self confidence and self-doubt to name a few.

I'm not meaning to be contentious with you, just trying to point out some obvious myths in this area, and trying to save future parents from thinking something is wrong with their baby, when it can't use the toilet, even at 12 or 18 months old. Some children are three or four before they are completely successful. Again, this does not mean the child is slow, or that anything is wrong. There is nothing wrong. The baby is still developing, as well it should be.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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when my son was 3...I aked why he pooped his pants...

he said he liked being cleaned by mommy.....

I was shocked and disturbed!!

we males are a strange folk.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 02:15 PM
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Great thread!

I just wanted to post and say that we've tried this from Day 1 with our newborn and she already does more pees and poohs above the potty than in her diaper. It all boils down to giving the baby the opportunity to do it in a potty several times a day, and already at 3 weeks old it seems she's holding her pee/poo for the opportunity.

Of course it's not 100% solid and there are 'misses' (not mistakes or accidents) but she definitely has awareness and control over her elimination needs.

So instead of potty training with all the embarrassing 'accidents' she'll be communicating her needs to us much sooner and will loose the diaper asap.




posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by Conspiracy Pianist
 


sorry...at 3 weeks impossible. your little super-baby has no idea or concept of potty training.

stop playing the classical music too...and just raise a normal kid.
your expectations of this child is scary..and will turn little junior into a psychological mess.

I bet your planning on teaching the little lass to read by the time she's 2...
let her crap herself..watch bugs bunny cartoons and be normal..without any pressure

edited for changing "he" into "she"

edited again for a poor up-bringing..and spelling.



[edit on 9-6-2010 by wrathchild]

[edit on 9-6-2010 by wrathchild]



posted on Jun, 10 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by wrathchild
 


Oh there shall be Naysayers.... oh well, here's a video of our 'super-baby'...



We respect our baby's hygenic needs instead of taking the easy route with disposable diapers.
She will not have embarrassing 'mistakes' when she's three years old, she'll be fully potty trained by then.

What do you mean with 'normal baby'?

You do realize that there were no disposable diapers decades ago, and that pretty much the rest of the world frowns at the idea of diapers?



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 12:03 AM
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we did infant potty training with my 1st son. I have photos of him on a potty chair at 6 months. He did ok with it, meaning he peed and sometimes pooped when i'd set him on it.. but i guess i didn't have the patience to stick with it and read his ques when he needed to go. So after a year or so i gave it up. and he started using the potty on his own when he was 3.
We didn't even try early with my 2nd. He didn't learn until he was nearly 4. But that is ok, thats when he was ready.



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 12:10 AM
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Originally posted by star in a jar
The natural way is the best way, nobody needs a big multinational company with an eye out for big profits to tell them that it's normal for a 3 year old to need to use diapers before graduating into 'big kid pants'.


With 'big kid pants' you mean the new pull-ups?



If the diaper industry gets their way we'll be in some sort of diaper from birth till death!




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