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Persistent Evidence of a Jovian Mass Solar Companion in the Oort Cloud

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posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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Hey guys, quite interesting, as a novice,

Q1.
Could someone explain (in plain english) why it is that we haven't been able to spot such a large object yet from earth observatories, or for that matter prior satellites?

I remember on a previous thread something about the light reflected/emitted/absorbed being a particularly awkward non-human spectrum type being an explanation of some kind, but how come nobody's seen it in silhouette/distortions passing in front of further objects/light sources?

Q2:
Haven't any of our deep space satellites (Voyager, Galileo) either encountered, or had to have accounted for it's presence in their presumably very delicate inter-planetary sling-shot hop-scotching?




posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 03:19 PM
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For the record, the conclusions presented in the paper:


We have described how the dynamics of a dominant galactic tidal interaction, weakly aided by an
impulsive perturbation, predicts specific properties for observed distributions of the galactic orbital elements
of outer Oort cloud comets. These subtle predictions have been found to be manifest in high-quality
observational data at statistically significant levels, suggesting that the observed OOC comet population
contains an  20% impulsively produced excess. The extent of the enhanced arc is inconsistent with a weak
stellar impulse, but is consistent with a Jovian mass solar companion orbiting in the OOC. A putative
companion with these properties may also be capable of producing detached Kuiper Belt objects such as
Sedna and has been given the name Tyche. Tyche could have significantly depleted the inner Oort cloud
over the solar system lifetime requiring a corresponding increase in the inferred primordial Oort cloud
population. A substantive difficulty with the Tyche conjecture is the absence of a corresponding excess in
the presumed IOC daughter population.


lanl.arxiv.org...


There is no direct evidence any such body exists.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by Essan
 


To the scientists what you just listed would be some pretty serious evidence. Theres more too:

www.the-rabbits-hole.com...

Especially notice the first few links and all the newspaper articles, even a picutre of this "dead" star taken by pioneer 10 as it left the solar system in a astronomy text book.

Not to mention strange timeline of the leaders including Denver International Airport.
This is excellent supportive evidence for something being up so to speak.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Thanks for your link!

Really amazing!
Therefore does Pioneer 10 have detected the Dark Star already?



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


This can't be the Nibiru star. There are 2 reasons:
1. It's estimated to be 25000 AU away. Pluto is 39 away. It's not coming closer.
2. It's too low a mass to be a star - ever.

The notion that things can only be seen from the south pole is silly. Any object far away from the earth , like the distance to the moon, can be seen from at least half of the earth.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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This is actually pretty big news whether you look at it from the Nibiru hypothesis, nemesis hypothesis or any other hypothesis for that matter. I hope to hear more updates about this. I'm surprised this isn't getting more attention.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by liveandletlive
 


No one could ever see this object since it is too small to ever light up like a star.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by liveandletlive
 


No one could ever see this object since it is too small to ever light up like a star.


I guess the question that you must then ask yourself is if it does exist how did our ancestors know about it?



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by curioustype
 


To detect an object we need to be able to either see what it radiates or reflected radiation from another source. We can see Venus and other planets because they reflect sunlight. The reflected light from Vebvus is strong enough that the planet can be seen with the naked eye. This conjectured object is larger than any of the other planets, but it is far away. A light year is 62,500AU and this object is around 25,000AU away. The amount of light being reflected back towards us is small. There is another possibility. The object is 4x Jupiter. It should emit infrared radiation. Due to the great distance and small size this object will not stand out that well against the brighter background of stars. What will be noticeable is that the earth moves in an orbit. This object will appear to move against the background stars as the earth moves. This is like holding your hand out and moving your head back and forth. Your hand position changes against the background.

The positions of the known planets has been well studied. We know that there is nothing planet sized within 320AU. If there was we'd see motions in the planets that cannot be accounted for. This object is so far away that its influence on the paths of the planets is there, but we can't measure that accurately at this point in time.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Again that worthless rabbits hole nonsense.

Notice that the dates are from the 1980s before better measurements were taken to show that nothing existed close in.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by liveandletlive
 


They didn't know about it.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Again that worthless rabbits hole nonsense.

Notice that the dates are from the 1980s before better measurements were taken to show that nothing existed close in.


So ridiculous that there are references to it on the way into Top Secret labs.

Just so i am clear, can you link me to evidence about there being nothing like that within 320 AU. I am curious to see who t is that has definitively determined this.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Constraining the Orbits of Planet X and Nemesis



So if we used our imaginations a bit, we could say that a sufficiently sized Planet X could be patrolling a snail-paced orbit somewhere beyond Pluto. But there's an additional problem for Planet X conspiracy theorists. If there was any object of sufficient size (and by "sufficient" I mean Pluto-mass, I'm being generous), according to a 2004 publication by David Jewitt, from the Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, we would have observed such an object by now if it orbited within 320 AU from the Sun.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by Antor
reply to post by Phage
 


Statistic data and new analisys update confirm the presence of a huge celestial body outer Oort Cloud. Maybe a Brown Dwarf.
It would have to aim the telescopes (WISE) in that spece region to detect THE TWIN. Easy.

You seem to be intent on ignoring the most important part of the abstract:

the probability of the companion hypothesis is comparable to or greater than the probability of the null hypothesis of a statistical fluke.


The fact is that this is no more than supposition at this point. The odds are that there is no such object in the Oort Cloud, and even higher that it would NEVER have an impact on Earth's inhabitants over the next several thousand years, at best, if it does exist.

ATS loses much credibility, if it has any remaining with posts that jump to ill-founded "conclusions" such as that this abstract consists of "proof" or "confirmation" of ANYTHING.

jw



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 



Thank you. That was a pretty good article.

I have always wondered if gravity might be tied to the EM effect of the local system. If this is so, what lies beyond the Oort cloud would be a far different story than what we presume now.

This whole thing has just enough doubt in it to give me some nice stuff to ponder, even if it is impossible (i just like to thinkn about abstract things).



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 11:47 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 

This huge objec, if exist, is a Dark star, a Brown Dwarf.


No, it isn't. We've already confirmed many extra-solar planets with mass greater than 5X Jupiter. They are nowhere near the minimal mass required in the definition of a brown dwarf or "dark" star.

This entire thread is based on a new report on old speculation, nothing more.

They cannot (and do not) even state that the probability of this object's existence IS greater than ZERO!

Might as well talk of some of the other "possibilities:" fairies, dragons and a big shoe.

You are giving ATS a bad name with pure speculation; this is the equivalent of tabloid journalism. Is that what the members want ATS to become?

jw



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 


Just so you know. Pluto can be seen with some basic methods. If there existed said world, it would be fraking bright.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:46 AM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by Antor
 


Just so you know. Pluto can be seen with some basic methods. If there existed said world, it would be fraking bright.


This hypothetical celestial body is very far away, on the edge of our planetary system, (if confirmed) and it is difficult to detect because, although its dimensions (4 times Jupiter) it is darken because the thermonuclear reactions have not been able to activate due of its dimensions.
Too big for a Planet, too small for a Star.
Brown Dwarf: en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 03:20 AM
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Another interesting article from Science Daily four years ago:



'Evidence mounts for Sun's Companion Star'

ScienceDaily (Apr. 24, 2006) — The Binary Research Institute (BRI) has found that orbital characteristics of the recently discovered planetoid, "Sedna", demonstrate the possibility that our sun might be part of a binary star system. A binary star system consists of two stars gravitationally bound orbiting a common center of mass

www.sciencedaily.com...

Most of the evidence has been statistical rather than physical.

[edit on 29-4-2010 by Antor]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Unfortunately Jewett's article was removed since he is no longer there and the file must have kicked off server alarms as it was beginning downloaded.

The distances come from table III, p347 of Jewett's article if I recall properly. It showed how far out an object has to be to not be noticed either by gravitational effects or by sky surveys.

But here is an interview with Mike Brown with more info on the issue. Brown found over 100 Kuiper belt objects.
Where Are You Hiding Planet X, Dr. Brown?



It is not impossible that the sun has a brown dwarf companion, but to be hidden from us it would have to be much, much further out than the Kuiper belt. Maybe like 100 times further. And at those distances its effects on the earth are pretty much zero. There are very good limits to what you can hide at what distances in the solar system and not detect their gravity. You could put a Mars at a few hundred AU (10 times more distant than Neptune, say) and everything would be fine. You could put a Jupiter at a few thousand AU (1000 the distance of Neptune), and, again, you're safe. There might even be things out there that someday we might find. I certainly hope so!



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