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A transient lunar phenomenon (TLP) from Lunar Orbiter 5?

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posted on Apr, 27 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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I've found an unusual anomaly into this image from Lunar Orbiter 5.
This mysterious and luminous phenomenon has an aspect filamentous, similar to an superheated plasma or electrical discharge.
But it could be other.
Transient Lunar Phenomenon en.wikipedia.org...

Is this a Transient Lunar Phenomenon picked by the space probe Lunar Orbiter 5?
Is this a swamp gas from underground cavity?
Is this an huge electrical discharge over the lunar suface?
Is this an attempt to cancel or tamper "something else" thar hover or lie above the lunar surface?

What do you think?

Here the souce.
www.lpi.usra.edu...
And the full image "H3"
www.lpi.usra.edu...




posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 


Very interesting actually, I am looking at this in photoshop now.

It has some crazy details about it. More in a few...



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by theability
reply to post by Antor
 


Very interesting actually, I am looking at this in photoshop now.

It has some crazy details about it. More in a few...



Thanks.
I'm not an expert but i find this "white object" or whatever it is, really strange.
Let me know your research.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 





Here is the Print resolution croped, great find BTW!

The cool thing about this is the Lunar Orbitors had film onboard the spacecraft. It was exposed then developed then scanned and transmittesd to earth, so this is unlikely to be artifact.

Which makes it more anomalious.

I'll find the documentation on the development process.



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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Here is the Lunar Orbitor Data Notes

I just downloaded the Tiff the 13Mb file it shows some interesting features.

The link is here



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by theability
reply to post by Antor
 





Here is the Print resolution croped, great find BTW!

The cool thing about this is the Lunar Orbitors had film onboard the spacecraft. It was exposed then developed then scanned and transmittesd to earth, so this is unlikely to be artifact.

Which makes it more anomalious.

I'll find the documentation on the development process.



Wow! Great work!
Thanks again for your job.
I wait your report!



posted on Apr, 28 2010 @ 02:10 PM
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I think It is inside the TYCHO Crater, if this will help.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 11:40 AM
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It is scratches or fuzz.

Maybe the OP found something which has been censored the lazy way?

[edit on 29-4-2010 by Exuberant1]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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Looking at it up close it looks like either scratches or a piece of thread. Maybe NASA's clean rooms were not so clean in the 60s?



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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The images are scanned from photographic prints.
Sure looks like lint on the scanner to me.

The Lunar Orbiter 16 x 20 inch prints from the LPI collection were scanned using a sheet-feeder scanner to create an archival digital file. Each print was digitized as an 8-bit grayscale image at 300 dpi, producing a file of approximately 29 MB in TIFF format.

www.lpi.usra.edu...


[edit on 4/29/2010 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Lint...

In an ultraclean and sterilized photographic Nasa laboratory...


Lints...

The same Old "dirty" Nasa...

Here the Original pdf. Photographic document from 1969.
How it works.

www.lpi.usra.edu...



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 



NASA? Ultraclean and sterilized lab?
Before you start talking, you should know what you are talking about.

The scan was not done by NASA, it was done by the USGS. Some scans were of prints, some of film. The prints were stored at LPI. The film was stored at the USGS in Arizona and at LPI in Texas. This is the scanner which was used.


Film Handling and Digitization: An inventory of the LO film collections at USGS (Flagstaff, AZ) and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (Houston, TX) was completed in FY02. This required surveying ~3000 canisters at each location, identifying multiple copies of desired frames, and recording handwritten data on film-strip numbers, frames, resolution, “quality”, and density for each canister. Film in each canister was then examined for completeness of strips, frame coverage (as compared to [2]), and validity of recorded film density for the type of terrain imaged. The best canisters were selected on the basis of contrast, cover-age, and minimal artifacts. Data from a single canister are used where possible to maintain consistent density.

www.lpi.usra.edu...


I'm quite aware of how the original images were made and transmitted to Earth. Thank you. I also know quite a bit about what we are looking at on the web.

We may be able to see a lint free version of the image before too long, as a result of this project:
www.moonviews.com...

[edit on 4/29/2010 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Pardon.

The same Old "dirty" USGS and LPI.

But the scanner wasn't on board on the Lunar Orbiter?


However, then:Which type of credibility has the images processed from these institutions (NASA, USGS and LPI)? Zero? It is this that you say?
They develop the most precious photos in the dung?
Not there is no precaution in order to develop photographies taken from missions cost billions of dollars?

Or something else? A real Transient Lunar phenomenon inside Tycho crater?

"Lint". Your respectable opinion.
For me, something else.
Thanks however.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 

Are you blind?
This is from the website where you got the image.

The Lunar Orbiter 16 x 20 inch prints from the LPI collection were scanned using a sheet-feeder scanner to create an archival digital file. Each print was digitized as an 8-bit grayscale image at 300 dpi, producing a file of approximately 29 MB in TIFF format.

www.lpi.usra.edu...

The Lunar Orbiter program did not cost "billions of dollars"

The Lunar Orbiter program was managed by NASA Langley Research Center at a total cost of roughly $200 million.

en.wikipedia.org...


[edit on 4/29/2010 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 



From astrogeology.usgs.gov...


The original photograph was scanned into a series of strips onboard the spacecraft and then transmitted to Earth as analog data. Photographic prints from these film strips were hand mosaicked into sub-frame (for HR data) and full-frame (for MR data) views and widely distributed.


And: 200 millions dollars in 1960! How many today? 50 years later?



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Antor
 


Who cares what $200 million in 1965 dollars is in 2010 dollars?
It isn't the sixties anymore and it is lint on the image.

As your quote says, the prints produced from the analog (television) transmissions were widely distributed. The one used for this scanned image had a piece of lint on it. Big deal.

[edit on 4/29/2010 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks for your "lint" opinion Phage.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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Any link whit this thread?

Vast static charge on the Moon. www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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I'll go with Phages' analysis of "lint" on the film. Seems like a better argument backed with solid facts. IMO



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by StonyJ
 


I'm really happy for you, phage and the "lint" theory!

Have a nice day.
Thans for your opinion.



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