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Police Seize Jason Chen's Computers

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posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Police Seize Jason Chen's Computers


gizmodo.com

Last Friday night, California's Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team entered editor Jason Chen's home without him present, seizing four computers and two servers. They did so using a warrant by Judge of Superior Court of San Mateo. According to Gaby Darbyshire, COO of Gawker Media LLC, the search warrant to remove these computers was invalid under section 1524(g) of the California Penal Code.
(visit the link for the full news article)

Mod Edit: Breaking News Forum Submission Guidelines – Please Review This Link.



[edit on 26/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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So the police decide to randomly raid the home of one of Gizmodo.com's top writers whom HAPPENED to have leaked info on the iPhone 4G ? No real explainations or anything?

Do you think they have any right to do this? Do you think Apple had anything to do with this?

They are saying the equipment was used to commit a felony, however it is illegal for police to seize the property of a Journalist.

This is absolutely ridiculous for anyone to have to go through.

gizmodo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

Mod Edit: Breaking News Forum Submission Guidelines – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 26/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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What did he destroy the product or something?

Whats so secret about the new phone. If companies like apple want to destroy your life, they can, it does not cost too much money to get you on some government watch list to be harassed, that is if they want too.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:44 PM
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not only did he NOT destroy the phone, he gave it back to Apple willingly when they asked for it after seeing he had it. That's what makes this absolutely absurd that it even occured.

Especially with the glaring mistakes done by the local police, including a night search NOT being authorized -- however the confiscation started after 9pm.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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What could they possibly hope to accomplish with this? It is obvious (through reading the document Gizmodo posted) that it has to do with seizing the pictures of the 4g iphone and all related materials. Why? Do they think this is going to keep people from seeing it? We've already seen it. It is already out there. They won't be able to remove all traces of it now that it has entered cyberspace. Are they just acting in revenge or do they actually think this is going to protect their precious hunk of useless plastic?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:55 PM
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Your taking a massive risk when you do such things against people like this. Companies if they wish can absolutely wreck your life. Governments have departments just there for this purpose, if you pay them money or in the know and have the right contacts.

He should be hoping he does not get on to the government list of targets.

It is obviously way of the top targeting a person like this and after he gave back the phone, he should of sold it to the chinese.

There is so much the government and companies can do to people today, was it worth it, for the risk of them doing anything to you.

He should be hoping he never gets on the government watch list.

[edit on 4/26/2010 by andy1033]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:57 PM
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Yeah goes to show that being rich gets you priority access to police. No crime was ever committed and there was never any evidence or suspicion of a crime. On top of that Chen is a journalist and all his work computers etc. were taken. I'd call this facism but since it's just another job bought with money some other name might be better, corporate facism perhaps?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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Am i missing something here folks? i'm not seeing anything about any Apple phone, can someone post the link to that story,please?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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Let's try this from the other angle.

Imagine the police found proof that this indeed was all a viral planned by Apple and Gizmodo along?

They are both the benefactors of this leak, Gizmodo for the hits on their site and Apple has free advertising.

Does anyone know yet who made this happen?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:11 PM
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the whole tale of the next iPhone is here:

gizmodo.com...

Jason Chen is the editor who wrote most of the information on it.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Grey Magic
Let's try this from the other angle.

Imagine the police found proof that this indeed was all a viral planned by Apple and Gizmodo along?

They are both the benefactors of this leak, Gizmodo for the hits on their site and Apple has free advertising.

Does anyone know yet who made this happen?


That is an interesting way to look at the situation as a whole, but I'm not too sure why the police would get involved unless they are either being played by whoever is orchestrating it or they are actually in on the whole thing.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by baddmove
Am i missing something here folks? i'm not seeing anything about any Apple phone, can someone post the link to that story,please?


I think they mean he was the one who brought the story out and now the police raided his home.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:16 PM
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i can see it already,"child pornography." they'll just slap that charge on him and teh world will hate him and not give 2 cents about him after that. it appears child pornography has been used to capture and kill people as of late.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Sounds kind of fishy. My favorite part of the story was all about the..

Random DRUNK guy.




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by stevenreanimator
 


Thanks, i was kinda in the dark there for a few minutes,
I appreciate the link, helped me to understand the OP better



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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I don't know all the details of this story, but...

From what I understand, this phone was left at a bar....someone discovered what it was....Gizmodo bought it from the person who found it (someone who wasn't the owner and had no right to sell it)....the rightful owner, Apple, asked for it to be returned....request was ignored (that makes it stolen property)....law enforcement gets warrant, with probable cause, to search premises for stolen property and proprietary software...

Where did the law enforcement go wrong?

Nowhere!



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
I don't know all the details of this story, but...

From what I understand, this phone was left at a bar....someone discovered what it was....Gizmodo bought it from the person who found it (someone who wasn't the owner and had no right to sell it)....the rightful owner, Apple, asked for it to be returned....request was ignored (that makes it stolen property)....law enforcement gets warrant, with probable cause, to search premises for stolen property and proprietary software...

Where did the law enforcement go wrong?

Nowhere!


They *DID* return it, right after Apple asked

source:
gizmodo.com...

The police weren't sent there to get the iPhone back.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by stevenreanimator
They *DID* return it, right after Apple asked

source:
gizmodo.com...

The police weren't sent there to get the iPhone back.


Like I said...I don't know ALL the details. However, he should have never taken possession of it...he should have contacted Apple and notified them that someone was trying to illegally sell it.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


According to Gizmodo, the guy who found it did try to contact Apple about it but was given the run-around. When Gizmodo bought it, they weren't sure if it was actually Apple property or just another hoax.

The site has a whole timeline of what they say happened with the phone.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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Considering Gizmodo banned me for questioning the journalistic integrity of the detailed article they wrote on the guy who lost the phone (They even took snapshots of his facebook for christsake), I couldn't care less.

Gizmodo writers are not journalists, in any sense of the word. You'll note they are not allowing any comments on their article regarding the warrant. They are simply bloggers who close their platform to anyone that does not agree with them or questions them.

In this case, I couldn't care less about this. Gizmodo is not protected under the law they are trying to be, and I sincerely hope they are firmly reprimanded, if not arrested.



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