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The Julian Calendar

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posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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The Julian Calendar was created by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and later implemented in 45 AD, however it becomes apparent when researching history that the calendar was implemented in several stages, but 1 BC later becomes the year when The Holy Roman Empire was established. This does not happen until 27 BC, about 17 years after the Birth of Caesarian, Ptolemy of Egypt last of the Pharaohs.

Anno Domini the previous system much like the Mayan Calendar counts down instead of up, but why? Partially because the ancients were highly successful using astronomy to predict future events.

Also note that the ancient Mayan long count calculated years about 360 days which would be more accurate since their are 360 degrees in a full circle. It is said that this has taken away from humans living in natural time, due to this most rely on solstices to get an accurate time stamp of the earths position in the milky way. But this is not about the Mayan Calendar it is about the Julian Calendar so I will continue.

If you were to go about conquering an empire you would do so by gathering their intelligence passed down generations and use it to your full advantage. This includes creating a codex in which certain dates that mark pivotal events for those who can understand, The Holy Bible. Though its not quite the same as the previous religion of Egypt its teachings remain very much in tact and tells of events back to the age of King Solomon.

This also means that you must alter the calendar in a way that is no longer understood by many, but by few.

Jesus Christ Superstar

Jesus now becomes the central figure in which the calendar was based.

Who made the Julian Calendar?

Julius Caesar did in 46 BC. One Year after the birth of his child with Cleopatra.

Who is the central figure in our calendar?

Jesus Christ is.

Ptolemy XV last of the Pharaohs

Caesarion was the son of Caesar and heir to the crown of Egypt. After Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC Caesarion was said to either have been executed at the age of 17 or have been exiled in around 27 BC where he later travelled with his new adopted parents Mary and Joseph. With them he travelled to India and was taken in by the monastery of brahman priests where he studied from the vedas for several years.

One of the core teachings of the Vedas was that in nature their is a balance, but this was later presented as a concept of good and evil later in the teachings of Jesus Christ, which the monks were outright opposed.

This happens as this figure returns to Alexandria Egypt and joins with Selene, his half sister in marriage and reclaims his right to the crown.

The Last Supper By DaVinci

The last Supper depicts Jesus Christ and his disciples, (they are celestial bodies) and DaVinci in my opinion DaVinci displays a profound knowledge of the universe. In the painting there is a hidden hand holding a knife. Similar to this profound piece of art the ancient calendar had 13 months, but now that Jesus Christ is the central figure their are only 12 months thanks to that hidden hand.

Why did Julius Caesar go about doing all of this?

To protect his children for generations to come and to make them all Kings and Queens.

So to be even more clear, 46 BC later became known as 1 AD but not until 27 AD, which marked the rise of The Holy Roman Empire or the year Caesarion was said to be either executed or exiled. Using this information you can cross reference any event that is BC to AD or vise versa you can also find historical accounts of Biblical figures and uncover their real identities.

Augustus Caesar and Tiberious

Upon the apparent Death of Caesarion 27 BC, Augustus Caesar, Julius Caesars nephew and adopted son takes power and continues power until he is later succeeded by Tiberius in 14 BC who in 26 BC was said to have exiled himself from Rome.

46-14 is almost 33 years and this is the age we are taught Jesus lived to be when he was crucified.

But lookie here Wikipedia says that Tiberious lived for 79 years.
en.wikipedia.org...

Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16, AD 37




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


Your dates are thoroughly confused. As far as I can tell, you're just mixing up BC dates and AD dates as though they were the same thing.

Can you explain what you think happened in an ordered sequence, in order of the date when they happened?

And to clarify one point; the identification of a particular date with the birth of Christ was only made many centuries later. In Caesar's time, dates were being identified by the name of the Consuls of that year, or perhaps in terms of "Ab urbe condita" (After the Founding of the City).



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Sort of. The dates we have today didn't happen until much later. The Anno Domini counts down to the beggining of the Holy Roman Empire, before that it was just the Roman Empire. BC now counts up to the birth of Jesus a year later in 46 BC the Julian Calendar was created but it did not become fully established until 27 BC when Augustus rose to power.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


Two historical points;

The present system in which dates are named BC or AD was first used in 525AD by the monk Dionysius Exiguus. You can look him up in Wiki. Julius Caesar had nothing to do with it.

The name "Holy Roman Empire" is even later. That title didn't really come into use until the German Emperor Otto the Great, who's time began 925AD. It was being called "Holy" because the Pope was getting involved. Of course there was no Pope in Julius Caesar's time.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by 12.21.12
Augustus Caesar, Julius Caesars nephew and adopted son takes power and continues power until he is later succeeded by Tiberius in 14 BC who in 26 BC was said to have exiled himself from Rome.

46-14 is almost 33 years and this is the age we are taught Jesus lived to be when he was crucified.




This is part of what I meant by confused dates.

Tiberius followed Augustus in AD14, not 14BC.

From 46BC to AD14 is actually 60 years (you have to add them))



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by DISRAELI

Originally posted by 12.21.12
Augustus Caesar, Julius Caesars nephew and adopted son takes power and continues power until he is later succeeded by Tiberius in 14 BC who in 26 BC was said to have exiled himself from Rome.

46-14 is almost 33 years and this is the age we are taught Jesus lived to be when he was crucified.




This is part of what I meant by confused dates.

Tiberius followed Augustus in AD14, not 14BC.

From 46BC to AD14 is actually 60 years (you have to add them))


AD 14 is correct. I got a bit ahead of myself and made a mistake.

Anyways 45 BC becomes the equivelant of 1 AD. Does that make more sense? So the dates do overlap quite a bit and it gets quite confusing.

The two dates to remember are 46 BC and 27 BC if you line those dates up and apply historical events comapered to biblical events side by side you will start to see the coorelations.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by 12.21.12


Anyways 45 BC becomes the equivelant of 1 AD. Does that make more sense? So the dates do overlap quite a bit and it gets quite confusing.



How does 45 BC become the equivalent of 1AD?

There are 45 years of history between them, and I could give you an account of what was happening during those years. So where does this "equivalence" come from?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


It is all surrounding one central figure to the Julian Calendar, Jesus Christ.

The Calendar was created in 46 BC by Julius Caesar when Caesarion was one year old, but was not fully implemented until 27 AD that would put the year 14 AD around the same time as the alleged crucifiction.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


So the timeline is;
47BC Caesarion born
46BC (one year later) Julius Caesar's calendar
1BC (forty-six years after the birth of Caesarion) Conventional date for the birth of Christ- in theory, on the boundary between 1BC and 1AD.
AD 14 (sixty years after birth of Caesarion) Succession of Tiberius; Your suggested date for the crucifixion
AD27 (73 years after birth of Caesarion) Your date for implementation of the calendar. But, as I've pointed out, this did not include the date-numbering system.

Is that what we mean?




[edit on 26-4-2010 by DISRAELI]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Well if you used my number system 33 years from the birth of Caesarion.

But yes I think you are grasping what I am saying.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


But you haven't given any reason for counting anything "33 years after the birth of Caesarion". That would be 14BC, which is 28 years before AD14. What reason have you got for making those 28 years disappear?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


If you look at Egypt at the time they were in bed with the Romans. There was a bit of a regime change and everything that dates after the rise of the Roman Empire then became Anno Domini and everything else pertaining to BC was applied to the age of the Pharoahs. After the last pharoah, Ptolemy XV came the rise of Rome.

[edit on 26-4-2010 by 12.21.12]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


That still doesn't explain what happened to the missing 28 years. There are recorded historical events covering all of those years.

As far as I can tell, that "33 years" part of the theory only works if 14BC and AD14 are the same year, the previous year was 15BC, the following year was AD15, and the 28 years between 14BC and AD14 did not happen.

If that's what you think, can you give a reason for thinking it?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Actually there are several years that are unaccounted for. Between around 12 BC-4BC and also 4 AD- around 12 AD. Give or take. Take a look though and you will find that the rise of the roman empire is always AD and the fall of the previous Empire is always BC.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 



AD27 (73 years after birth of Caesarion) Your date for implementation of the calendar. But, as I've pointed out, this did not include the date-numbering system.


Also that should say 27 BC not 27 AD. It is indeed a very confusing subject.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


I'm still puzzled. In what way is the rise of the Roman Empire "always AD"?

In my history books, the dates are still being recorded as "BC" until half-way through the principate of Augustus. The boundary-line between BC and AD doesn't seem to be marked by any particular event in Rome. Let me see, I'm just hunting through "From the Gracchi to Nero", by H.H Scullard. 8BC, Augustus received a renewal of his "proconsular imperium". In 2BC he received the title of Pater Patriae (Father of the Nation). Tiberius was adopted as his son in AD4. Let me remind, you, anyway, that nobody wascalling these years BC or AD. All the years had names like "In the consulship of Tiberius and Drusus".

Also, care to be specific about which years are unaccounted for? Remember, you need 28 of them.

I've just seen your correction of the 27AD point below this editing box. Fine; I'm not sure how much it changes the debate.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


I could put together a better timeline for you but that will take time. I do have one somewhere but I am having trouble finding it.

Anyways 27 BC is important becuse it marks the rise of the Roman Empire. 46 BC-27 BC was a transformation of government and religion. Thats why 27 BC is important because at this time they were using a Julian Calendar. Also note that in 14 AD there was a roman census which ended in mass casualties.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by 12.21.12
 


OK, agreed 27BC vitally important year in Roman Empire.

The rest had better wait until you find the detailed timeline.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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I'm astounded at the good faith of the respondents to this most absurd and pointless of threads.

Thsi maybe be a one-liner, but at least it's a true one.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:57 PM
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Gday,


Originally posted by 12.21.12
Also that should say 27 BC not 27 AD. It is indeed a very confusing subject.


It's a simple subject,
but, YOU confused AD with BC.

Now you can't admit it....


K.



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