It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

'I can't afford surgery in the U.S.,' says bargain shopper

page: 2
30
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:28 PM
link   
reply to post by Legion2112
 


People could afford it if it was changed to whats being discussed here, one example is the inhaler.... the rest of the market would correct itself also given COMPETITION.




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:14 PM
link   
reply to post by svpwizard
 


That would work wonders for reigning in the pharmaceutical companies, but I'm not sure just how feasible "medical" tourism would be for a lot of mainstream America - sadly we're probably going to be reamed by doctors, hospitals and insurance companies peddling medical coverage for some time to come - I think though that a sudden uptick in the amount of medications purchased overseas might put them on notice though...



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:33 PM
link   
Sorry, I'm at work and I skimmed the story. I was wrong.


***crawls off to the corner to think about what a bad person I've been****

[edit on 4/26/2010 by Blaine91555]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:43 PM
link   
reply to post by Blaine91555
 


Wow dude, did you even bother to read the story before hitting us over the head with your bitchery?

He was quoted a total of $30,000 - which was in error, turns out it was supposed to be in the neighborhood of $14-$15k. In any case, since he "shopped" around and that's the best he could get locally, I can't blame him for seeking treatment elsewhere.

Not to harp, but now in addition to reading the story I would suggest you go back and read the posts - virutally no one here has voiced support for the healthcare bill.

Glad your wife could get her surgery done safely at a significantly reduced price, but for most of us (even those of us who have health care), that's not how our money-hungry medical professionals operate - literally.

Of course, we're probably just wrong - y'know, us folks that like to stiff hospitals because we just don't like paperwork



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:53 PM
link   
reply to post by Legion2112
 


See my altered post.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 05:05 PM
link   
Thanks for this thread...Wales, huh? I'm very interested in medical tourism and have been getting this newsletter (link below) and looking for more organizations like this. I won't hesitate to shop around for medical care and consider going elsewhere for medical care with all my baby boomer money ; ) if something major happens to me. In some ways I am very cautious about these organizations though and it should be noted that there is a lot of money being moved around "investing" in medical tourism and that includes entire new sections of the banking and investment industry. Poke around and do some research on the big bank you may be doing business with and you will see that what I am saying is true.

www.medicaltourismmag.com...



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 05:24 PM
link   
reply to post by DaddyBare
 

I'm in the same boat, DaddyBare. I got a lot of very high quality dental care done in Mexico and loved visiting there, shopping the Mercado, drinking Mexican Coke made with real cane sugar, gelatos, practicing my Spanish but I'm afraid to go anymore. The bridges I got done in Mexico were actually made in Texas then shipped back to Mexico and the dentists were trained in the US and office was state of the art and very easy to business with. I'm so sad about what is happening on the border and it's even sadder for people with family in both countries.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 05:57 PM
link   
reply to post by Blaine91555
 


No worries man, happens to the best of us... especially when reading about something as divisive as health care whilst at work. Makes one cranky



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 05:58 PM
link   
Severely cut my heel severing the Achilles 8yrs ago in may. Was at the time carying three mortgages easily and making six figures doing custom electronics.
Due to preexisting I could not get insurance so paaid 45000 out of pocket to save the foot. less than a yr later it ruptured and rolled up in my leg.It then began to decompose and fester.The clinic which handled the reconstruction would not even see me without insurance despite my having paid in full previously.
I now have had two open drainage wounds for almost 7 yrs and the best I can get in this country is about double what I paid originally. I need either a simple surgery to clean up the dead tendon or to have the leg removed. at this point I will accept either but will not pay the outrageous cost they want here in the US.
I am personally looking at Costa Rica right now but am researching as my trip will likely be one way



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 06:24 PM
link   
reply to post by N.of norml
 


That's all well and good, but at what point is sticking to your principals about not paying the high cost of surgery in the U.S > your life?

You've gone from "possibly losing the foot" to now "losing the leg". Before long it could be "losing both legs" or worse.

[edit on 26-4-2010 by sos37]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 06:30 PM
link   
These arguments are all well and good but isn't the problem with inflated costs of medical care in the U.S. all because of insurance companies and frivolous malpractice suits?

Doctors know insurance companies will cough up the money, even though they have to negotiate a payment with them (FYI, the amount doctors want and the amount insurance will pay are two separate things - that does NOT mean that you, the insured, are liable for the remainder). However, doctors will still overshoot by a wide margin what they want because they know insurance companies will come down off that figure. The reality of what they actually get is still pretty high, comparatively.

I don't know why insurance companies agree to pay even half of what doctors ask for when they know the value of the service isn't worth that much. Seems like if insurance companies put their collective feet down then maybe doctors and pharma would quit overshooting their quotes. Of course I'm not in the insurance biz, so I really lack a lot of knowledge in this area.


[edit on 26-4-2010 by sos37]



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 09:51 PM
link   
I have to agree, my mother has been getting surgery in mexico recently (as shady/awful as that sounds) and it's honest just as good/professional and it's at a fraction of a cost of places here. My mother even one of the best insurance providers/plan and she still has to do things like this.

I think international competition would start to make healthcare more commercial, and even more accessible financially.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:04 PM
link   
reply to post by sos37
 


I'd agree with you if the illusion of the U.S. having the greatest system of health care in the world weren't just that, an illusion. The medical community in this country has been force-feeding that down our throats for years now, telling us how we're taking our lives into our own hands if we dare venture outside U.S. borders for treatment. Fact is that used to be true... maybe a decade and a half ago. Many parts of the world have since caught up (those that hadn't already). Not only is it insulting to those doctors and surgeons outside our country who are just as well trained and have access to the same level of equipment, it borders on the criminal when you factor in the money they're trying to keep in their pockets.

Now I'm not suggesting you head off to Somalia for a root canal or anything, but to assume now, in 2010 that the rest of the world is years behind the U.S. in medical knowledge or skill is just ignorant.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:16 PM
link   
To give you an idea of how cheap medical help is in Mexico, please click on the link. It goes to a blogger in Mexico, Fred. He can be quite insightful and humorous. He details his experience with medicine in Mexico. It an eye-opener, especially to those that think Mexico is merely a Third-World country.

www.fredoneverything.net...



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:20 PM
link   
Medication doesn't grow on trees. It's going to cost money, and surgeons need to get paid. But the cost is indeed a bit extreme.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:31 PM
link   
reply to post by Aliensun
 

Thanks for that link. I agree with what he said about doctors and dentists in Mexico too - they don't have the God - like ego so many in the U.S. have. Imagine a life in which your every financial decision and every job decision doesn't revolve around the question "how will I afford health care/insurance?" Sigh. The U.S. will probably figure out a way to tax the hell out of us for buying health care in other countries soon enough.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:35 PM
link   
Certainly some great ideas in this thread. Too bad congress did not want to listen. Rather than address specific problem areas, they opted for the panacea approach that will only serve to create of a record number of brand new govt departments to oversee this mess and the red tape to go along with it.

Sadly, this whole thing will be "figured out" as they go. Sebelius said it herself.

Say hello to new taxes and surcharges and the closure of hospitals that no longer meet govt. guidelines. I highly doubt anyone will save any money with this.


MBF

posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:36 PM
link   
My mother needed an epidural for pain in her back and leg. They took her off her blood thinner 8 days before they tried last week. Her blood was too thin for the procedure so the doctor put her on a shot 2 times a day until the procedure. I went to pick it up and was asked if they told me how much the 16 shots were. I was told $386 and I asked how much the insurance paid, she came back and said the total cost for the 16 shots was $1390. I like to have passed out. There is no reason for drugs to cost this much.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by piddles
I have to agree, my mother has been getting surgery in mexico recently (as shady/awful as that sounds) and it's honest just as good/professional and it's at a fraction of a cost of places here. My mother even one of the best insurance providers/plan and she still has to do things like this.


Wow, that is sad to hear, but I am glad she is getting the attention she needs and at a cost she can afford.

She's a boldder person than myself.
I would have gone to Canada.

Worrying about shoddy healthcare when crossing the border into Mexico for surgery or other medical needs is just one in a list of concerns, and the others are even medical related.



- Lee



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 10:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by sos37
reply to post by N.of norml
 


That's all well and good, but at what point is sticking to your principals about not paying the high cost of surgery in the U.S > your life?

You've gone from "possibly losing the foot" to now "losing the leg". Before long it could be "losing both legs" or worse.

[edit on 26-4-2010 by sos37]


Losing the foot when it was hanging by the sole after the injury, losing the leg once the tendon had been rolled up my calf for months, now yrs. I was willing to give up the leg opposed to the radical treatment proposed,coupled with the exorbitant price of treatment and factored with the prognosis of less function at least and losing the leg any way at worst.
Now after 7 yrs of doing my own wound care it is stable and still draining neutrophiles and leukocytes in autolysed tissue with out infection but hardly without pain. I have little doubt I can survive until I make the final choice as to where my aging ass will finish the race and get my peg fixed. but it has been made very plain it will not happen here medically and economically
N.



new topics

top topics



 
30
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join