Unemployment for Those Who Earn $150,000 or More is Only 3%, While Unemployment for the Poor is 31%

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posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by GreenBicMan
 


O.K. GreenBicMan -- I've had numerous discussions with you. Congratulations you finally got a sell for your automated prediction program. Seriously considering Wall St has recovered due to a massive bailout by the future taxpayers of the U.S. (considering 2/3rds of corporations pay no income taxes).... Well the best way to make money is to kiss up to Wall St. So what you're doing makes sense!

I often thought that myself -- yeah the next job I'm going to have is at a bank -- I mean go where the money is right? haha. One of my coworkers actually did that. But I'm too pissed at the banks for holding back on their VISA transactions so they can slam people with overdraft fees!! It's a $40 billion profit a year -- milking the poor with ATM overdraft fees since the banks change the transaction processing times. I actually discovered this on my own and asked a banker about it -- not accusing anyone -- just sincerely trying to figure out why the transaction would just disappear from my record and then reappear right when my account could trigger an overdraft fee. I had thought it was processed already and didn't understand what had happened. It said it was processed! haha.

topdocumentaryfilms.com...

This documentary MAXED OUT exposes this bank scam.

motherjones.com...



The overdraft industry, which started only 16 years ago, has grown to nearly $40 billion. It's one of the banking industry's biggest honeypots. How? Well, many people don't realize that you can incur more than one overdraft fee in a single day, or that many banks deliberately reorder purchases to ensure that you pay the maximum number of fees. And while the Fed finally ruled that come July consumers must opt in to overdraft protection, it didn't address the central flaw: Overdraft fees are essentially a form of loan sharking. Consider that the average overdraft amount is $17 and is paid back in five days. With the typical overdraft fee now around $35, this works out to nearly $2 in fees for every $1 borrowed, an effective annual percentage rate of more than 10,000 percent. Not even the Mafia has a vig like that.




posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by drew hempel
reply to post by GreenBicMan
 


O.K. GreenBicMan -- I've had numerous discussions with you. Congratulations you finally got a sell for your automated prediction program. Seriously considering Wall St has recovered due to a massive bailout by the future taxpayers of the U.S. (considering 2/3rds of corporations pay no income taxes).... Well the best way to make money is to kiss up to Wall St. So what you're doing makes sense!

I often thought that myself -- yeah the next job I'm going to have is at a bank -- I mean go where the money is right? haha. One of my coworkers actually did that. But I'm too pissed at the banks for holding back on their VISA transactions so they can slam people with overdraft fees!! It's a $40 billion profit a year -- milking the poor with ATM overdraft fees since the banks change the transaction processing times. I actually discovered this on my own and asked a banker about it -- not accusing anyone -- just sincerely trying to figure out why the transaction would just disappear from my record and then reappear right when my account could trigger an overdraft fee. I had thought it was processed already and didn't understand what had happened. It said it was processed! haha.

topdocumentaryfilms.com...

This documentary MAXED OUT exposes this bank scam.

motherjones.com...



The overdraft industry, which started only 16 years ago, has grown to nearly $40 billion. It's one of the banking industry's biggest honeypots. How? Well, many people don't realize that you can incur more than one overdraft fee in a single day, or that many banks deliberately reorder purchases to ensure that you pay the maximum number of fees. And while the Fed finally ruled that come July consumers must opt in to overdraft protection, it didn't address the central flaw: Overdraft fees are essentially a form of loan sharking. Consider that the average overdraft amount is $17 and is paid back in five days. With the typical overdraft fee now around $35, this works out to nearly $2 in fees for every $1 borrowed, an effective annual percentage rate of more than 10,000 percent. Not even the Mafia has a vig like that.


Kiss up to Wall St.? You mean working my ass off to better myself? I like the terms you use.

But I will agree that banks are notorious for overdrafts where they wont deposit your funds for one day and then hit you with the fees. I've been victim to that about 100 times as well. Quite costly indeed.

Cash is king.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan


Owe 41,000 to what? What the hell are you talking about?



www.brillig.com...



The estimated population of the United States is 308,259,624 so each citizen's share of this debt is $41,797.01.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


Dude.. come on.

So since our debt is at this level we all owe 41,000 to big ben right?

Do me a favor and scan the copy of the check you sent into Big Ben for that amount.

Until then please don't twist stats to fit an agenda.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan

Originally posted by drew hempel
reply to post by GreenBicMan
 


Kiss up to Wall St.? You mean working my ass off to better myself? I like the terms you use.


motherjones.com...



...a staff of virtuoso traders and brilliant mathematicians, $10 million worth of fancy engineering workstations, and an initial capitalization somewhere north of $1 billion.... The Dow Jones average might get all the attention, but Wall Street pros know two things: The market for debt is far larger than the market for equities, and it provides far more fertile ground for mathematical manipulation and epic profits. But clever mathematics alone isn't enough to make Gatsbyesque fortunes. For that, you need to use leverage. You need to borrow other people's money. Lots of it.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


You need a lesson in what margin and leverage is.

This is all hippie bull#.

motherjones.com? More like stupid#.com

You can get 200:1 or 500:1 leverage if you wanted RIGHT NOW as well. You will blow up though because you do not know the fundamental basics. That is obvious (no offense, really).



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:22 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan
reply to post by drew hempel
 


Dude.. come on.

So since our debt is at this level we all owe 41,000 to big ben right?



www.cogwriter.com...



Maybe they should have, because 2012 also is the beginning of a three-year period in which more than $700 billion in risky, high-yield corporate debt begins to come due, an extraordinary surge that some analysts fear could overload the debt markets. With huge bills about to hit corporations and the federal government around the same time, the worry is that some companies will have trouble getting new loans, spurring defaults and a wave of bankruptcies. The United States government alone will need to borrow nearly $2 trillion in 2012, to bridge the projected budget deficit for that year and to refinance existing debt.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


what are you trying to say?

you keep posting links then changing the subject.

no one owes 41,000 to big ben

like I said just scan the copy of the check you sent in with the memo on it of FU BIG BEN just for kicks.

I'll be waiting



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan
reply to post by drew hempel
 


You need a lesson in what margin and leverage is.



www.nytimes.com...



Next in line are companies with investment-grade credit ratings. They must refinance $1.2 trillion in loans between 2012 and 2014, including $526 billion in 2012. Finally, there is the looming rollover of commercial mortgage-backed securities, which will double in the next three years, hitting $59.7 billion in 2012.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


Again, you just keep posting links with information that isn't relevant.

I'm done with this thread, just keep wasting my time.

I hope you all enjoy the endless hyperlinks with information that isn't relevant to anything pertinent to the conversation.

Have a night day



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan
[

Kiss up to Wall St.?


motherjones.com...



But in 1980, after the great financial deregulation of the Reagan era began, his charts show a sudden discontinuity—while households, corporations, and commercial banks grew another tenfold between 1980 and 2008, the securities sector grew nearly a hundredfold. This was the financialization of America, as Wall Street evolved from providing financial services to creating products—junk bonds, credit default swaps, subprime loan securitization, collateralized debt obligations—designed to allow Wall Street itself to prosper. By the height of the credit bubble between 2000 and 2007, the financial industry earned a staggering 40 percent of all corporate profits recorded in the United States, four times what they earned in 1980. Over the same period, average pay on Wall Street doubled, while bonuses at the top sextupled.


Say hi to Uncle Ben for me!



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by TheCoffinman

The CEO of Boeing succinctly summarized a recent study by Northwestern University's Center for Labor Market Studies regarding unemployment rates for different income brackets:



THE STUDY WAS BY THE NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSTITY -- Northwestern is in Evanston, north of Chicago. Northeastern is in Boston.



A recent study by The Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston highlights the consequences in a pretty dramatic way. The Center analyzed the labor conditions faced by income-grouped U.S. households during the fourth quarter of 2009. In the face of one of the worst economic environments in memory, those in the highest income groups had nearly full employment levels, with just a 3.2 percent unemployment rate for households with over $150,000 in income and a 4 percent rate in the next-highest income group of $100,000-plus. The two lowest-income groups -- under $12,500 and under $20,000 annually -- faced unemployment rates of 30.8 percent and 19.1 percent, respectively.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


First of all, did you read the disclaimer at the bottom of the page? Also, it says, "some states."

Although I checked, I could not find a date anywhere on the article you are presenting. The laws change all the time, so word to the wise if you are an employer who is giving more than a termination date when called on an ex-employee.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by Blanca Rose
 


Yeah you're not the boss of me! haha. J/K.

I totally agree with you -- it's kind of like the gay discrimination laws -- in some 29 states you can still be fired for being homosexual.

Is that cool or what?



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


Well Drew, not to derail the original topic of this thread, but, no, in my opinion that isn't cool. A lot of states also have at will clauses when hiring, so it wouldn't surprise me. I'm sure they will use another excuse anyway, like the person showed up 5 minutes late for work, or something else as silly...

Still, most employers will only give start and termination dates, to be on the safe side, for reasons like you describe. It helps them not to look biased in any way.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan

Kiss up to Wall St.? You mean working my ass off to better myself? I like the terms you use.

But I will agree that banks are notorious for overdrafts where they wont deposit your funds for one day and then hit you with the fees. I've been victim to that about 100 times as well. Quite costly indeed.

Cash is king.


One thing that I have noticed is it seems that those complaining are people who have not continually improved themselves and continually worked to imporve their livehood, or they are rather young and want things to just fall into their laps.

I'm 49 now and my life didn't really start to get what I conceder "good" until I was in my late 30s and not really good until my mid 40s and my whole life I just continued to work to do better. That has meant I had to change my expertise a number of times and live all over the place, and I still haven’t stopped.

My hat off to those who have done well at an earlier age, but most need to understand work really sucks at first and it only gets better when YOU get better. When I was 20 I complained to my dad that my pay sucks and he asked me how much do I think my job is worth and I said, about what I’m being paid….

The Democrats tend to push the “evil rich” propaganda and even Obama has put a number on it, but that is just hype to gain the votes of those who are not in that category, but the reality is those who do not see themselves doing well only need to look in the mirror to see who is at fault.

BTW you are right in “cash is king”, and credit except for a house and maybe a ONE car is the down fall to most who want it all now and end up owing 10,000s on credit with really nothing to show for it.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


Obviously Afghanistan is full of complainers -- I say we O-Bomba them!

en.wikipedia.org...



Unemployment rate (%)↓ Afghanistan Afghanistan 40.00


www.guardian.co.uk...



*UN commissioner warns of Afghan starvation threat guardian.co.uk, Sunday 14 October 2001 14.04 BST United Nations human rights commissioner Mary Robinson has called for a pause in the US-led bombing of Afghanistan to allow food aid into the country and prevent a "Rwanda-style" humanitarian disaster. The former Irish president said that otherwise America and its allies could preside over the deaths from starvation of millions of people in Afghanistan.


[edit on 25-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by drew hempel

Obviously Afghanistan is full of complainers -- I say we O-Bomba them!

en.wikipedia.org...

Unemployment rate (%)↓ Afghanistan Afghanistan 40.00


I just spent four months there and most don't have electricity or running water either, and it has been that way forever, but what also they don’t have are expectations that they deserve to be better off, and so they are happy with just very few basics.

[edit on 25-4-2010 by Xtrozero]



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


sites.google.com...




This site is dedicated to informing people about the ongoing, US Alliance-imposed Afghan Holocaust and Afghan Genocide that as of December is associated with post-2001 violent and non-violent avoidable deaths totalling 4.5 million and Afghan and Pashtun refugees totalling 5-6 million – an Afghan Holocaust and an Afghan Genocide as defined by Article 2 of the UN Geneva Convention


afghangenocide.blogspot.com...

[edit on 25-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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What I don't understand about this is simply why is anyone comparing the amount a 'poor' person gets to the amount someone more stable at 150000 per year gets. There is no comparison. Hell if a 'poor' person making 300.00 per week at their regular job is going to get far less to make it on than the 150000 per year gets, so is the beef here that the 'poor' get too much or the rich don't get enough? Why are they being compared unless you want to begrudge the poor of the small amount of help they can recieve? Why not just bitch about the rich wanting more, which is the bottom line here, than 3%?






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