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Strange new star goes against the sky

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posted on May, 4 2010 @ 07:09 AM
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Originally posted by dragnet53

Originally posted by stereologist
Sounds like Orion has already set. In the southwest would be Procyon.


Well before Orion set I did see a reddish star near the belt of Orion.



I probably shouldn't comment without looking up the facts ( I will in a min and edit if I need to)....but I dont think Orion has totally set just yet. I do believe we can catch Orion in the western sky in the evening, at least another month or so mabey. Im guessing also that the red light is Mars. Again, I will have to look it up to be sure.

Edit to add for other viewers....if you ARE stepping out to look at the North West sky..make sure that there are not trees or other objects that could block a view point for you. You might think something isnt big enough to block it, but Venus sits low in the sky. If you are not keeping the low sky clear...you may mistake and only see a somewhat bright star that shines colors and sparkles.

Someone said that they werent sure if it was Venus cause Venus is only the second brightest object in the sky. Venus is second......to the MOON. So if you are seeing a extremely bright star, it looks like it could just pop out of the sky.....you gotcha a look at Venus for sure.



[edit on 4-5-2010 by LeoVirgo]




posted on May, 4 2010 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by LeoVirgo
 


The person stated that Orion was not visible. It sets early now. It might mean that the belt was obscured and that Betelgeuse was seen or it could have been Capella. I was avoiding making speculations about the sighting since there were no hints at all. I doubt the viewer saw Mars since they reported twinkling and Mars is in Cancer.



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 07:49 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


I kinda thought you were meaning that in the moment of the viewer was looking at the sky, Orion had already set for that evening. I was just coming back to say, just in case someone is looking for it, that it can still be seen.

I dont mean to seem nit picky, and I sure do make a lot of mistakes when trying to relay info of the cosmos. Be patient with me though...I do love the sky so much and I will always be glad to claim my mistakes.

After looking at some things, you are right...the red star is not likely Mars (setting much late in the night) but instead being Betelgeuse or Capella...I was always surprised when I watched Orion in the East how red and gorgeous Betelgeuse was.

I learn through my mistakes and my putting my foot in my mouth


Thanks for that



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 07:55 AM
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Sorry, I was going to correct the mistake about Orion. Somebody beat me to it.

[edit on 5-4-2010 by groingrinder]



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 08:05 AM
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reply to post by LeoVirgo
 


I hardly think you made a mistake. It's just the simple confusion of a slow conversation across the internet.

When we go camping I always point out Betelgeuse if visible to show kids that stars are different colors. Arcturus and Antares are also good red stars.

What's interesting is that you get kids looking for all of the star colors and someone will jump in with the guesses of green and purple which do not occur in the sky. It's fun to learn about the stars.



posted on May, 4 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Thanks


The slow convo via internet does make it tough. And since I am learning so many small things that really make a big difference to larger things...I find myself having to point out to a poster that surely knows much more then me....that I need them to be more clear.



posted on Oct, 8 2010 @ 07:35 PM
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I live in New Brunswick Canada, and I noticed it also, it was actually moving, I compared with the other brighter stars, and this one was really moving, shimmering and changing colors, it isn't venus!
It's something new that wasn't there months before, but highly noticeable.



posted on Oct, 10 2010 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by Blank96Stare
 


I love NB. Kouchibouguac is a great place.

Anyways, I think you are looking at Jupiter. The word planet comes from wanderer. That's why Jupiter appears to be a new object in the sky.



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 12:46 AM
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Originally posted by Blank96Stare
I live in New Brunswick Canada, and I noticed it also, it was actually moving, I compared with the other brighter stars, and this one was really moving, shimmering and changing colors, it isn't venus!
It's something new that wasn't there months before, but highly noticeable.


Ok THIS is exactly what I saw last night and it surprised me. I dragged my husband out of the shower half soaking wet to see it. I tried to take pics with my Droid X but it wouldn't show up. It was bright but definitely not as bright as Venus. It pulsated from blue to red as my husband and son confirmed they could see it transitioning in colors! It appeared to have some slight movement but not much. I used Google Sky Map and the ONLY thing relatively close was Capella. So I googled Capella to find out that it is 2 binary stars within close proximity. Maybe that is the reason it pulses, changes colors and twinkles far more than anything I've ever seen.



posted on Oct, 15 2010 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by favouriteslave
 



So I googled Capella to find out that it is 2 binary stars within close proximity. Maybe that is the reason it pulses, changes colors and twinkles far more than anything I've ever seen.


Capella may be a binary system, but the stars are so close to each other that it appears to be a single star. Even in most telescopes Capella appears to be a single object.

The pulsing, twinkling and so forth is due to atmospheric effects. The light from the star is rather uniform. It passes through 42 light years of space rather unchanged. In the last few miles of journey from the star to your eye the light is corrupted by the atmosphere. What you observed is the reason for building a space telescope. It is the reason telescopes are placed on mountain tops.



posted on Dec, 5 2010 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by demonseed
 


I live in Melbourne Australia and I have been observing this "new" star for about a year.... Reading in various forums and searching on various sites there is an ocean of opinion from Venus, to Sirius to Nibiru and so on but not one corresponded to its true position.
Perplexed by the fact I was not satisfied with any information I was reading or that none of it actually gave a definitive answer to my curiosity,
I converted a 600mm telephoto lense and hooked it up to my digital camera.
What I first saw had me thinking I had discovered a UFO.. However after close inspection of the image it looks very much like a satellite.
My next step is to check when and where if any.???? Geostationary (follow the earths rotation) satellites launched and dispatched in that location. From my limited knowledge it seems to fit as far as location is concerned being within the "clarke" belt.
It could also be a rather bizzar coincidence as Capella seems to be the only star in that vicinity and that the "reflection" off the satellite may be seen to be a magnification of Capella's brightness.

Take care...

Here is the link for the photograph..

www.youtube.com...



posted on Dec, 5 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by felonius
 


yeah thats not a star i see the same thing here in ohio sometimes! u look at it and it tries to make u think either ur lookin at an airplane or soemthing or tries to act like it needs to get in position to act like part of the night sky!



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by spyvsspy666
 


Just use a star chart and figure out what you are watching. Better yet after a year of time go find the local astronomy club and they will get you fixed up in seconds. The one thing it can't be is a geostationary satellite. Too small and way too far away. They orbit 22k miles up.

Check with the local astronomy club and you'll find out in seconds what it is.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by metalholic
 


As I recommended to the previous poster check with the local astronomy club and find out what you are observing.

You appear to claim that the object moves in the sky. That's a well known problem of people attempting to observe a dot against a dark field. In experiments indoors with a fixed light on a dark wall observers draw complex patterns of movement. The issue is with the observer, not the fixed light.



posted on Dec, 6 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by demonseed

Originally posted by Chadwickus
Sounds like it might be Venus, it will get real bright after sunset and then set not long after.

Did you see a cluster of stars above?

This is Pleiades



i thought it was venus, but its not. If you check stellarium venus is no where close to that location.

sorry for the lac of a pic, i know. I was busy and i thought i had the cables to upload the video. When i realized i didnt it was too late and the star was gone.

Ive been seeing this star for about 4 days now at roughly the same time.


Pleiades (7 sisters constellation) is in the eastern sky this time of year.
At 9 PM it is about 70 degrees up from the eastern horizon.
The OP clearly stated that what he is seeing is in the NORTHWEST
sky. Also, Jupiter is in the southeast sky at the same time.
edit on 6-12-2010 by endtimer because: additional comment



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