It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What can you tell me about water?

page: 1
7
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 07:36 PM
link   
The last big winter storm knocked down trees and there was no electricity to pump water in my city. Water could not be bought anywhere, and new shipments trucked in were quickly sold out.

I always keep a few cases of water in the house but it wouldn't last long in a big emergency.

I thought about getting a water barrel that collects rainwater from the gutters, but I was told that there is stuff in roof tiles so you can't drink water from rain gutters. I have been on islands where they collect the water from rain in big containers under the houses and use it for everyday use. How do I know if my roof tiles have bad stuff in them?

On another post someone said he had big blue plastic barrels in his basement full of water and he refills them every 6 months.

Could I just buy some plastic bins or 5 gallon containers and fill them with tap water?

Or just leave a few buckets outside when it rains and drink rain water?

We have water-run-off channels and small streams. I assumed I could use that water to drink until I read an article about all the chemicals that people put on their yards filling the streams after it rains. I don't think my water filter will remove toxic chemicals.

I think I saw a boy scout manual that described using a plastic sheet to collect water from the air on humid days (or perhaps it was collecting dew).

I think digging a hole 4 or 5 feet away from a stream and letting the water seep through the dirt to the hole migh be enough to filter toxic stuff from stream water, but I am not sure. Does anybody know for sure?

What do you know about water?




posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 07:48 PM
link   
reply to post by NotThat
 




What do you know about water?



I can't breathe in it...





Assumption here, but mobility is a concern as well, correct..?


Mobile Unit...





posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:02 PM
link   
2 parts H, 1 part O.

store it however you want, seal it as well as you can to slow evaporation. if stored for a long time, boil it if you can or use iodine tabs, tastes like crap, but it works

[edit on 24-4-2010 by jacksmoke]



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by happygolucky

Assumption here, but mobility is a concern as well, correct..?


Mobile Unit...




Hey, thanks! I haven't seen that water filter. It even filters out the junk people put on their yards. Great!



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by jacksmoke


store it however you want, seal it as well as you can to slow evaporation. if stored for a long time, boil it


How long do I need to boil it?



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:18 PM
link   
Ice storm = Frozen grass and plants.

Break off all of these leaves and put it in a plastic baggy and wait for it to melt. Make sure to boil it and/or filter it.

Great questions.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phlynx
Ice storm = Frozen grass and plants.

Break off all of these leaves and put it in a plastic baggy and wait for it to melt. Make sure to boil it and/or filter it.

Great questions.


Thanks! I never thought of that. So it is OK to drink rain water? As a kid my mother told me it would make me sick.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:31 PM
link   
reply to post by NotThat
 


not always, depends on what was in the cloud it came from i suppose, e.g. drinking the rain water from area wouldn't be wise, as i live next to selifield (Big nuclear power plant)

and as for boiling it, im sure once its all boiled for at least a few minutes it should be ok, boiling it just kills of the bacteria you dont want to drink right?



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:34 PM
link   
If you store it in plastic be very careful, long term storage in certain (most?) types of plastic can leach chemicals and toxins into the water.

Also the bottled water in plastic bottles, be careful where you store them! - It has been known for certain chemicals from other containers to find their way through the plastic into the water - A big batch of bottled water once had to be recalled because it spent time in storage next to industrial chemicals, it tasted disgusting and the test's showed this chemical whatever it was... No one could figure out how the hell it got in there till they traced where the pallet may of been stored, lo and behold a where house simply placed the 2 pallets close to each other for a week or 2.

Also remember that boiling only works for things like bacteria and other living organism's - most likely boiling will do nothing for chemical or other contamination, it may even make the containments react with each other in unexpected ways.

People in some mountain ranges somewhere can draw water from the air using fine nets strung on posts along a ridge (a sea facing ridge?) - the wind skims the water vapour and in the colder mornings it collects like dew - maybe the technique could be replicated with women's tights? - But you would prob need a lot to get a big enough surface area.

You can, in very serious circumstances, drink your pee... But only once or twice!! Each time through it will only concentrate the wastes your body was trying to expel in the first place.

The best water is the water you didn't have to carry for miles! - Good water is good water, it weighs 1kg per litre, so you are very unlikely to be able to carry a weeks worth on your back!!!


Originally posted by NotThat
Thanks! I never thought of that. So it is OK to drink rain water? As a kid my mother told me it would make me sick.


I suppose that would depend on the level of pollution in the air - as the rain falls it does soak up that stuff, for instance rain from near a busy road and or industrial area will very likely make you sick, if that's all you drink for an extended period who knows? Cancer maybe?

Out miles away from anywhere the pollution would get really diluted out by the natural actions, you should be fine drinking that.

edit: Oh one more thing about catching rain water - One single bird dropping can ruin all your hard work!! - Seriously you may not even notice, but birds carry some nasty things in their droppings... Boiling should do the trick though.

[edit on 24/4/2010 by Now_Then]



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:47 PM
link   
You can drink about anything you want after treating it with Zerowater - You can measure the amount of contaminants in water. An average bottle of Zephyrhills water contains about 170PPM, and a bottle of Wal-Mart's Great Value contains about 180-190PPM. Tap water is between 210PPM and 230PPM.



[edit on 24-4-2010 by Kevinquisitor]



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 08:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by Ibex08
not always, depends on what was in the cloud it came from i suppose, e.g. drinking the rain water from area wouldn't be wise, as i live next to selifield (Big nuclear power plant)




I don't really know this area. I suppose some other companies could be putting pollutients into the air.

I will check that out. Thanks.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then
If you store it in plastic be very careful, long term storage in certain (most?) types of plastic can leach chemicals and toxins into the water.

Also the bottled water in plastic bottles, be careful where you store them! - It has been known for certain chemicals from other containers to find their way through the plastic into the water

Also remember that boiling only works for things like bacteria and other living organism's - most likely boiling will do nothing for chemical or other contamination, it may even make the containments react with each other in unexpected ways.


So the big plastic bins I use to store winter clothes probably won't be a good thing to use to store water that I will want to drink. It would probably be OK to use to bathe with though, or to wash clothes.

I wonder if mold can get into bottled water like the chemicals did. Very interesting.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then


People in some mountain ranges somewhere can draw water from the air using fine nets strung on posts along a ridge (a sea facing ridge?) - the wind skims the water vapour and in the colder mornings it collects like dew - maybe the technique could be replicated with women's tights? - But you would prob need a lot to get a big enough surface area.



I am having a hard time picturing this. Is one end of the net higher than the other? Do you need a bucket somewhere to collect the dew?



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:18 PM
link   
Some people scoff and wikipedia, but I scoff at them, hah! It can be a great resource for the discerning reader. The are is full of fun information: Properties of water

Hope that helps. Water has all kind of wonderful and unique properties.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then



You can, in very serious circumstances, drink your pee... But only once or twice!! Each time through it will only concentrate the wastes your body was trying to expel in the first place.



I remember reading that you can make good water out of pee. You put the pee in a big dishpan. Put the dishpan in a hole in the ground so it is level with the ground. In the middle of the dishpan of pee put a smaller bowl. Put a plastic sheet over the pan and put rocks all around the plastic. Put one rock in the middle of the plastic so it centers the empty bowl. The rock should make the plastic slightly lower than the rest of the plastic.

When it gets warm, the pee will cause condensation to form on the plastic and water will drip into the bowl.

Supposedly all the impurities will stay in the dishpan.

It is supposed to work with salt water, too.

I never tried this - just read about it.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then



Oh one more thing about catching rain water - One single bird dropping can ruin all your hard work!! - Seriously you may not even notice, but birds carry some nasty things in their droppings... Boiling should do the trick though.



That's so gross. Thanks, I hadn't thought about that. In the spring in Alaska much of the water is unsafe to drink due to animal droppings getting into the water. It is called "Beaver Fever" and local people know to boil the water when the snow begins to melt.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kevinquisitor
You can drink about anything you want after treating it with Zerowater - You can measure the amount of contaminants in water. An average bottle of Zephyrhills water contains about 170PPM, and a bottle of Wal-Mart's Great Value contains about 180-190PPM. Tap water is between 210PPM and 230PPM.



[


Thanks for the website. I never heard of zerowater. I will check it out.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 09:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by Threadfall
Some people scoff and wikipedia, but I scoff at them, hah! It can be a great resource for the discerning reader. The are is full of fun information: Properties of water

Hope that helps. Water has all kind of wonderful and unique properties.


Well, that was really interesting but not very helpful.

When the storm hit, I wasn't able to bug out. I was stuck and there was no water coming out of my taps.. My questions have to do with how to I get enough safe water to cook and drink if I am staying put.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 10:17 PM
link   
I think your best option would be boiled rainwater. Boiling water is generally the safest bet, it's just not used because it costs too much compared to other options. Unless something catastrophic happens to pollute the rain too much, I think it's probably safest given the options of rain water and digging only a shallow well.

Digging a well is fine if you know where to dig. You need to make sure it's upstream from whatever pollution, even far away (i.e. make sure the groundwater wasn't flowing from any urban area, farms, or golf courses, mines, etc.) and that's hard to tell unless you know how the water tables are in your area. If you're picky, you might be concerned about any natural metals and minerals in your area as well. But considering you're talking emergency circumstance, that's probably the least of your concerns. If you can get water from the top of a mountain, that's probably the safest.

Aside from boiling water, I guess you can run it through some kind of filter. Reverse osmosis is best and you can buy those. If you were to build your own filter, there are different types of sands you can use. A combo of diatomaceous earth and finer silica sand should do fairly well, but you want the flow to be slow enough to filter, and the sand not so fine that it keeps getting clogged. Granular activated carbon also works very well with adsorbing bacteria and some of the worse chemicals though I wouldn't use it as the only treatment. These materials need to be refilled fairly often, especially since I can't really explain how to calculate and create a backwash system in a thread.

Basically, the typical water treatment system is 1) a grit remover, 2) a tank to keep the water calm so the heavy stuff drops to the bottom, then don't disturb the water to keep the gritty stuff from mixing back into the water 3) a sand filter of some sort to get rid of the solids/bacteria that won't fall to the bottom, 4) carbon (can't remember what step this would be actually, but it should get rid of volatile organic chemicals), and 5) UV light. ... so, if you can do all these, you should have fairly decent water.

[edit on 24-4-2010 by ATSdelurker]



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 06:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by ATSdelurker
I think your best option would be boiled rainwater. Boiling water is generally the safest bet, it's just not used because it costs too much compared to other options. Unless something catastrophic happens to pollute the rain too much, I think it's probably safest given the options of rain water and digging only a shallow well.

Digging a well is fine if you know where to dig. You need to make sure it's upstream from whatever pollution, even far away (i.e. make sure the groundwater wasn't flowing from any urban area, farms, or golf courses, mines, etc.) and that's hard to tell unless you know how the water tables are in your area. ]


When I went to Africa we boiled all the water we used. Sometimes it tasted like pee or metal. I can't remember how long we boiled it, but it seemed like a long time. One person can drink alot of water in one day.

I live in a city and within a few blocks from a golf course. It sounds like the ground water here could be polluted if I dug a well in my back yard.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join