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Cosmic Finger Taps Our Galaxy's Shoulder

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posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 09:25 AM
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So I dont have to worry about finding a (last minute Im going to die) sex partner.
Good News

A little more on Topic- thats some crazzzzzy A$$ S#*^!

its beautiful.

Edit-




[edit on 25-4-2010 by Common Good]




posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by Common Good
So I dont have to worry about finding a (last minute Im going to die) sex partner.
Good News

A little more on Topic- thats some crazzzzzy A$$ S#*^!

its beautiful.

Edit-




I wonder what it would look like from up close and personal... I wonder if there are any intelligent civilizations over there that are now quietly kacking their pants??

Peace Out,

Korg.



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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Ok, time for me to jump in with a noob question!
I saw a few people arguing about the time aspect of this. Now they're saying it IS currently happening but it is happening 70,000 lightyears ago, now hwo do i word this...

We see a star blow up in the sky, but we don't. What we see is the light,t he effects of the star blow up thousands of years AFTER it actually happened.

has that been taken into account here? so, is it happening 70,000 light years away, but has it took so long for us to see/pick it up that it really happened 20,000 years ago.

As i say, noob question and I'm not an expert in this field,as you can guess! but if some one could figure tat out please...



posted on Apr, 25 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by ProTo Fire Fox
Ok, time for me to jump in with a noob question!
I saw a few people arguing about the time aspect of this. Now they're saying it IS currently happening but it is happening 70,000 lightyears ago, now hwo do i word this...

We see a star blow up in the sky, but we don't. What we see is the light,t he effects of the star blow up thousands of years AFTER it actually happened.

has that been taken into account here? so, is it happening 70,000 light years away, but has it took so long for us to see/pick it up that it really happened 20,000 years ago.



Well, that's quite an interesting thought, the light of this event would have had to have traveled for 70,000 years before we saw it.. Although we could extrapolate what may happen the margin for error is huge as there are too many variables and unknown unknowns.

It basically means this started happening 70,000 years ago and where the actual event is taking place right NOW will be totally different and much farther advanced..

All the best,

Korg.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:46 AM
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Yeah Bro, thats what I was thinking.
So can anyone clear up the time issue now?Is that what is happening,or has happening? In other words, or we going to be screwed, or are we screwed right now...



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 02:32 PM
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This is star wars war... Get ready to rumble


It looks beautiful



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas
Very nice info !


I'm always wondering where they have found the nerve to present it with a picture and all to see.

I mean, We have not even left our own solarsystem yet.


LOL was thinking the same thing, mabey some potential sent a pic from there uniphone
.

And whos to say if the CONDUIT WONT LINE UP WITH EVERYTHING ELSE um just sayen!!70,000 lyrs but how fast is the GALAXY SPINNING? And where are we in that pic presented on the far left far right or closer then being said.

[edit on 4/26/10 by Ophiuchus 13]



posted on Apr, 30 2010 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by shagreen heart
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


uhhhh... i know i'm out of my element, but someone explain to me how this isn't cataclysmic?


someone should answer my question--without an obnoxious monty python reference.



posted on Apr, 30 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by shagreen heart
 

It is cataclysmic.
But it is a very, very slow cataclysm...from our point of view.

But it's not the only thing that's going on. We will "soon" consume another galaxy...slowly.

www.adsabs.harvard.edu...


[edit on 4/30/2010 by Phage]



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by shagreen heart

Originally posted by shagreen heart
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


uhhhh... i know i'm out of my element, but someone explain to me how this isn't cataclysmic?


someone should answer my question--without an obnoxious monty python reference.


Not a Monty Python fan I take it??


Phage is right. This event is nothing short of titanic, though there are varying degrees of cataclysm, this titanic event is small when say compared with the m31 galaxy collision estimated to occur in roughly 4 1/2 billion years. posted a simulation earlier.

Peace out,

Korg.



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 04:30 AM
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Originally posted by Korg Trinity

Originally posted by shagreen heart

Originally posted by shagreen heart
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


uhhhh... i know i'm out of my element, but someone explain to me how this isn't cataclysmic?


someone should answer my question--without an obnoxious monty python reference.


Not a Monty Python fan I take it??


Phage is right. This event is nothing short of titanic, though there are varying degrees of cataclysm, this titanic event is small when say compared with the m31 galaxy collision estimated to occur in roughly 4 1/2 billion years. posted a simulation earlier.

Peace out,

Korg.



no, not really a fan of monty python. basically, they're funny once. after that, you can't laugh anymore. although probably the hardest i've ever laughed was when i was 8 years old and i saw the rabbit scene from holy grail--some channel aired it after saturday morning cartoons. then again i was 8.

anyway, my next question is:
how does this affect the part of the galaxy it is visibly mingling with?



posted on May, 1 2010 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


Wow, thank you for finding and posting this very interesting article, great find! Like you I don't know why it isn't all over the news! I thought when two galaxies come together there is a reaction, as they 'collide', so this is kind of confusing, but you gave me the material to spend the rest of the morning checking it out, thanks, star and flag!




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