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*Legal Question; about SHERIFFS

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posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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I was told by a undercover Sheriff \ DEA type, that the County Mounty aka SHERIFF's do not have Jurisdiction to do anything outside the County Court House or Sheriffs Facilities. it appears, from what I was told, that they were Incorporated in Washington DC which means their Jurisdiction extends for 10 square miles.
(*note this conversation was about many topics and this is what I gathered from talking with this individual. he made sure I would not use his name. or the county or state he works for. so this could be totally bogus information.,
but what if it isn't...? please assist me at getting to the bottom of this Jurisdiction thing... TKS, AE




posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:43 AM
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The Sheriff has jurisdiction over the Entire County they operate within.

Police have jurisdiction within city limits.

State police have jurisdiction within the entire State.

And Federal Marshals have jurisdiction anywhere in the US territory.

I am pretty sure this is 100% correct information.

(Granted there are regional differences depending on where you are).



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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That was my assumption, which prompted the conversation about how wrong I was. and since your comment does not have any Legal information I have to classify your post as "hear say" because that is what I assumed.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:59 AM
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No it's not though.

I see my local sheriffs drive around all over the county.

It is more than hear say, it is first hand experience.

I don't have any law books on hand that cover this subject though, as almost all of my law books are business law.

So I will aid you and help look for the actual LAW from the Lawbook.

This is what your buddy needs to be proven wrong I guess? lol.

Lets see what we can find.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Look, I see them too, but the question is, do they have Jurisdiction to enforce law outside of Washington DC, Sheriffs Facilities, Court House.
my information say's: "we assume they do, but they don't" and I can not find anything on the subject - so, this is a question for someone who knows Corporate Law, I would imagine since that is what this individual eluded towards.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:08 AM
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I know this is off topic, but found it funny and REVEALING.

Here is a link to some Legislation in Ohio.
www.legislature.state.oh.us.../h0150-ph-126.htm

Add "/h0150-ph-126.htm" to the end of the link since it's not working on ATS for some reason.

Look at this statement.

"and the chief of police of each municipal corporation"

They straight up admit this nation is just a corporation.

How disgusting.

[edit on 23-4-2010 by muzzleflash]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:10 AM
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From Wiki

In the United States, a sheriff is generally (but not always) the highest law enforcement officer of a county and commander of militia in that county. A distinct part of law enforcement in the United States, sheriffs are usually elected. The political election of a person to serve as a police leader is an almost uniquely American tradition. (The Honorary Police of Jersey, a UK Crown Dependency in the Channel Islands, have been elected since at least the 16th century.)[1]


In the U.S., the relationship between the sheriff and other police departments varies widely from state to state, and indeed in some states from county to county. The general rule is that sheriff deputies concentrate their law enforcement activities in the unincorporated areas of their county, and on county property such as courthouses, and their role in incorporated areas (cities) is more supportive than primary.

Think of it like working in a department store... your assigned to the electronics section but someone walks across the aisle and asks for help picking out a tool box... as a store employee your well within your Jurisdiction to assist even if your primary duties lay along slightly different lines

Edit to add
Source of more general info

[edit on 23-4-2010 by DaddyBare]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by Anti-Evil
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Look, I see them too, but the question is, do they have Jurisdiction to enforce law outside of Washington DC, Sheriffs Facilities, Court House.
my information say's: "we assume they do, but they don't" and I can not find anything on the subject - so, this is a question for someone who knows Corporate Law, I would imagine since that is what this individual eluded towards.


I understand what you are saying now.

Isn't "Corporate Law" also called "Admiralty law" ?

And I thought the USA was primarily a "Common Law" legal system, and that Common Law actually trumps in a court. Law set by precedent.

And since the precedent has been set, that Sheriffs can go anywhere in their counties, and this has been protected by the legal system, than we must assume that they have this power. Because they surely are exercising it.

However, I will not leave it at this.

I will help find a actual real law to prove it.

I will not be surprised if we cannot find such a law though, as our system is pretty hypocritical and full of crap. lol.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:24 AM
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The OP is right in the fact that they only have jurisdiction in the district of columbia BUT the key thing to remember here is that by having a social security number and filing and w2, w4 or 1099 your are essentially electing your self into public office and claiming your domicile in the district of columbia so thus they have jurisdiction over you. It's all a very big game of art of words. For example they ask if you live in any of the "States" (Notice the capital "S") and everyone says yes. However if you were to look up the definition of State (with a capital S) and state (lowercase s) you will find that State is defined as only the district of columbia, guam, puerto rico and samoa islands and a few other us territories but when you see "state" that is defined as all of the states of the Union. Its also the same if you claim you live in the "United States" which is defined as only U.S. territories compared to the "United States OF AMERICA" which is defined as the states of the union. The only reason they have any jurisdiction over anyone is because people directly contracted with crooks and GAVE them the jurisdiction over the people thus because of this contract if you ever go to court and try to argue your freedoms derived from the bill of rights the judge will tell you to suck a fat one because under their jurisdiction you have no rights only the "privileges" they decide to give you and no longer do your rights come from the Constitution but they come from the Uniform Commercial Code or the Code of Federal Regulations.

[edit on 23-4-2010 by xSe7eNx]

[edit on 23-4-2010 by xSe7eNx]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:03 AM
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Jurisdiction is a problem for the courts, not for the officers. Any sworn officer takes an oath to uphold the law, and they must act regardless of where they are. If they are smart and experienced, they will de-escalate a situation and call the local police to do the arresting/reporting/transporting, but jurisdiction has nothing to do with their authority to thwart a crime.

A "County" Sheriff has jurisdiction in that entire county, including Federal and State buildings, but local custom may instruct them to avoid areas that are overlapped by other police forces.

My buddy is an FBI agent, and he likes having "authority" over and above the TSA when he flies. His jurisidiction is all Federal Space, including Airspace, so although he is usually very polite and abiding, if he gets a rude TSA person, he likes to pull rank on them!



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
The Sheriff has jurisdiction over the Entire County they operate within.

Police have jurisdiction within city limits.

State police have jurisdiction within the entire State.

And Federal Marshals have jurisdiction anywhere in the US territory.

I am pretty sure this is 100% correct information.

(Granted there are regional differences depending on where you are).


In Cal all peace officers are sworn to the state, meaning they have police powers everywhere in the state.

For example a beverly hills police officer, or officer defined under 830.1PC, can stop you in san diego, or anywhere in Cal, as well as take any and all enforcement action necessary. It's not uncommon for multi agency task forces staffed with cops from numerous agencies to team up and work cases together..

The difference in dept names (police Vs sheriff) relates more to who pays the officers / deputies salary, their assigned RD (reporting district) and what their responsibilities are as defined in the state codes. Sheriffs depts are tasked in state codes with operating county jails, deputies are paid by the county. CHP (legally aka "traffic officers") highway safety / law enforcement.. paid by the state. Police depts with municipal / general law enforcement... they get paid by the city that hires them.

All law enforcement agencies employ state sworn & trained peace officers who must comply with strict POST (police officer standards and training) requirements.

A beverly hills cop can legally patrol neighboring sheriffs RD of west hollywood, or LAPDs RD hollywood division etc.. but they are paid by the city of beverly hills to patrol within beverly hills city limits... dept policy keeps them from straying outside city limits on 'routine patrol'.

In Los Angeles the 13,000 strong sheriffs dept operates all the county jails and provides police services to numerous contract cities (like compton, west hollywood / malibu), the metro (subways, buses) and unincorporated county areas (like athens)... in LASD patrol areas sheriff deputies are the local "police".. but don't call them "officer", they prefer "deputy".. the city pays the county for police services, the county pays the deputies.

LA county is a giant mess / mixture of police & sheriffs, along with 20+ police depts.. LAPD has 19 (or more) patrol divisions, LASD about 15.. plus the CHPs dozen or so stations... try tracking a LOJACK in the san gabriel valley; with a CHP station and half dozen police depts.. you'll see cops from 2 sheriff patrol stations, 4 police depts and the CHP all converging on the signal in a mad game of cops & robbers "hide and seek".

States vary though, some have state police, even constables .. cal used to have a state police, they were absorbed into the CHP like 20 years ago.



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