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15,000 protest to RAISE taxes and to "Chop from the Top"

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posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


thank you, another post that proves my point. I think you should go back and read this thread from the beginning before you continue acting like a child.




posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


thecitizens.blogspot.com...



Tax exemptions for homeownership in the United States amount to a government hand out of approximately $26 bil a year. Yet fewer than 1/4 of low-income Americans receive federal housing subsidies. Three quarters of Americans, usually the more affluent, get housing aid from the government in the form of favorable tax exemptions.




To add to the fire, banks and corporations, defense, and agribusiness, all get some form of direct or indirect subsidy. * The Savings and Loan bail out (which we are about to repeat) costs us about $37 bil a year and will for the next 30 years. * Agribusiness gets about $18 bil a year * In 1997, the FCC handed out broadcast licenses for digital TV for free. The estimated value had they been auctioned was set at $20-70 bil. * Timber industry: $427 million +tax breaks * Aviation: $5.5 bil a year, not to mention the bail out after 9/11. * Mining: $3.5 bil a year * Tax avoidance through off-shoring $12 bil a year * Defense Contractors , the top ten of whom took home $67 bil in 2002 and $108 bil in 2006). Add it up and you get something in excess of $126-$234 bil annually.





They suck up resources needed to fix social security, medical care, and education in this country. They don't provide jobs really because they help maintain inefficient industries. Secure, fair paying jobs are more numerous in efficient and competitive industries.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by drew hempel
reply to post by aravoth
 


thecitizens.blogspot.com...



Tax exemptions for homeownership in the United States amount to a government hand out of approximately $26 bil a year. Yet fewer than 1/4 of low-income Americans receive federal housing subsidies. Three quarters of Americans, usually the more affluent, get housing aid from the government in the form of favorable tax exemptions.




To add to the fire, banks and corporations, defense, and agribusiness, all get some form of direct or indirect subsidy. * The Savings and Loan bail out (which we are about to repeat) costs us about $37 bil a year and will for the next 30 years. * Agribusiness gets about $18 bil a year * In 1997, the FCC handed out broadcast licenses for digital TV for free. The estimated value had they been auctioned was set at $20-70 bil. * Timber industry: $427 million +tax breaks * Aviation: $5.5 bil a year, not to mention the bail out after 9/11. * Mining: $3.5 bil a year * Tax avoidance through off-shoring $12 bil a year * Defense Contractors , the top ten of whom took home $67 bil in 2002 and $108 bil in 2006). Add it up and you get something in excess of $126-$234 bil annually.





They suck up resources needed to fix social security, medical care, and education in this country. They don't provide jobs really because they help maintain inefficient industries. Secure, fair paying jobs are more numerous in efficient and competitive industries.


lol, that was a good piece of comedy, thanks for sharing.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


No -- this is funny!

www.mentalfloss.com...



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by drew hempel
reply to post by aravoth
 


No -- this is funny!

www.mentalfloss.com...


if you love taxes so much why don't you and you ilk volunteer to pay more to the IRS every April then?, They pay for such wonderful things. Like blowing up Afgahni's, graduating kids who can't read from high school, bailing out corporations, awarding no-bid contracts, wire tapping your phone, turning the food supply into plastic cups, paying farmers not to farm, paying fishermen not to fish, paying loggers not to log, paying for oil company's R.n.D., paying for sex offenders to live within 1000 feet of an elementary school, paying for Israel, paying for Israel's Enemies, etc...

You are right

I had it all wrong. Thank god you were here to enlighten me. The government is truly a force for good in this world. From now on I will allot half of my paycheck to the FED's, maybe they can use the money to bomb a wedding in a third world country that has no chance at fighting back.




posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


www.wisegeek.com...



This article, like most, completely overlooks the most important feature of a minimum wage: redressing the balance between high earners and low earners. For example, the Waltons each year currently earn seven hundred thousand times what their average worker makes in a year. A minimum wage might mean that the poor Waltons would have to settle for making only six hundred thousand times what their average worker makes in a year without the price of anything having to be adjusted in the slightest.


www.clevelandfed.org...



It turns out that the vast majority of the published evidence suggests that there is little reason to believe that wage inflation causes price inflation. In fact, it is more often found that price inflation causes wage inflation.


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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At her urging, the crowd turned to face the Capitol and shouted "Raise my taxes."


Idiots everyone of them! The ignorance of the people is astounding!

It would be fine if it were voluntary but its not and those people don't speak for everyone. That's what all the self proclaimed socialist don't get. If they would make all thier socialist crap voluntary then it would not be stealing from those who don't wish to participate. But they won't do that cause they know most of the producers would not participate and they would not be able to steal what they need for socialist programs.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


you know what would be awesome?

If you could spout an original thought all on your own.

But then, google is a great tool for useful idiots.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


As other people have already pointed out to you -- originally in the U.S. corporations had limited charters that had to be renewed and were revoked -- all the by state legislature.

There was no "limited liability" -- check out poclad.org... for further details.

Even farmers markets have regulations! General Smedley Butler sums up the truth the best:



At least 21,000 new millionaires and billionaires were made in the United States during the World War. That many admitted their huge blood gains in their income tax returns. How many other war millionaires falsified their tax returns no one knows.





Then our very generous international bankers were financing Japan. Now the trend is to poison us against the Japanese. What does the "open door" policy to China mean to us? Our trade with China is about $90,000,000 a year. Or the Philippine Islands? We have spent about $600,000,000 in the Philippines in thirty-five years and we (our bankers and industrialists and speculators) have private investments there of less than $200,000,000. Then, to save that China trade of about $90,000,000, or to protect these private investments of less than $200,000,000 in the Philippines, we would be all stirred up to hate Japan and go to war – a war that might well cost us tens of billions of dollars, hundreds of thousands of lives of Americans, and many more hundreds of thousands of physically maimed and mentally unbalanced men. Of course, for this loss, there would be a compensating profit – fortunes would be made. Millions and billions of dollars would be piled up. By a few. Munitions makers. Bankers. Ship builders. Manufacturers. Meat packers. Speculators. They would fare well.





Well, the average earnings of the du Ponts for the period 1910 to 1914 were $6,000,000 a year. It wasn't much, but the du Ponts managed to get along on it. Now let's look at their average yearly profit during the war years, 1914 to 1918. Fifty-eight million dollars a year profit we find! Nearly ten times that of normal times, and the profits of normal times were pretty good. An increase in profits of more than 950 per cent. Take one of our little steel companies that patriotically shunted aside the making of rails and girders and bridges to manufacture war materials. Well, their 1910-1914 yearly earnings averaged $6,000,000. Then came the war. And, like loyal citizens, Bethlehem Steel promptly turned to munitions making. Did their profits jump – or did they let Uncle Sam in for a bargain? Well, their 1914-1918 average was $49,000,000 a year! Or, let's take United States Steel. The normal earnings during the five-year period prior to the war were $105,000,000 a year. Not bad. Then along came the war and up went the profits. The average yearly profit for the period 1914-1918 was $240,000,000. Not bad.





Who provides the profits – these nice little profits of 20, 100, 300, 1,500 and 1,800 per cent? We all pay them – in taxation. We paid the bankers their profits when we bought Liberty Bonds at $100.00 and sold them back at $84 or $86 to the bankers. These bankers collected $100 plus. It was a simple manipulation. The bankers control the security marts. It was easy for them to depress the price of these bonds. Then all of us – the people – got frightened and sold the bonds at $84 or $86. The bankers bought them. Then these same bankers stimulated a boom and government bonds went to par – and above. Then the bankers collected their profits.





The only way to smash this racket is to conscript capital and industry and labor before the nations manhood can be conscripted. One month before the Government can conscript the young men of the nation – it must conscript capital and industry and labor. Let the officers and the directors and the high-powered executives of our armament factories and our munitions makers and our shipbuilders and our airplane builders and the manufacturers of all the other things that provide profit in war time as well as the bankers and the speculators, be conscripted – to get $30 a month, the same wage as the lads in the trenches get.





It has been estimated by statisticians and economists and researchers that the war cost your Uncle Sam $52,000,000,000. Of this sum, $39,000,000,000 was expended in the actual war itself. This expenditure yielded $16,000,000,000 in profits. That is how the 21,000 billionaires and millionaires got that way. This $16,000,000,000 profits is not to be sneezed at. It is quite a tidy sum. And it went to a very few.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 10:42 PM
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Originally posted by aravoth
reply to post by drew hempel
 


you know what would be awesome?

If you could spout an original thought all on your own.



Drew, I agree with the chap

We are here to expand our minds, learn how to think, reason and strategize.
This might not be apparent now...

I had my ass handed to me many times in the beginning (profiles ago), but I am an equal opportunity offender and have chastised many for the same.

You are up against the Major League with this challenge, go for it, you can't build biceps tapping your toes.

Find a gap, stick to the gap and don't say anything that you will have to defend later,
YOU CAN DO IT!



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


WALL STREET creates the ultimate governments!

www.reformed-theology.org...

Wall Street and the World Revolution

American Bankers and Tsarist Loans
Olof Aschberg in New York, 1916

American International Corporation
The Influence of American International on the Revolution
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York
American-Russian Industrial Syndicate Inc.
John Reed: Establishment Revolutionary

www.reformed-theology.org...



Chapter One Wall Street Paves the Way for Hitler 1924: The Dawes Plan 1928: The Young Plan B.I.S. — The Apex of Control Building the German Cartels Chapter Two The Empire of I.G. Farben The Economic Power of I.G. Farben Polishing I.G. Farben's Image The American I.G. Farben Chapter Three General Electric Funds Hitler General Electric in Weimar, Germany General Electric & the Financing of Hitler Technical Cooperation with Krupp A.E.G. Avoids the Bombs in World War II Chapter Four Standard Oil Duels World War II Ethyl Lead for the Wehrmacht Standard Oil and Synthetic Rubber The Deutsche-Amerikanische Petroleum A.G. Chapter Five I.T.T. Works Both Sides of the War Baron Kurt von Schröder and I.T.T. Westrick, Texaco, and I.T.T. I.T.T. in Wartime Germany


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 11:31 PM
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www.theatlantic.com...



Given all that, it's not surprising that John Bogle supports increased regulation of the financial industry. "We need to bring long-term investment back," he told me. "Logic has to prevail in the long run. All these corporations want to build shareholder value. But they define shareholder value by the price of the stock. That's absolutely absurd. The price of the stock is a momentary, transitory thing that can be reversed in a moment, or washed away or greatly enhanced over the course of years and decades. You'd be amazed how much more difficult it is to raise the intrinsic value of a company than to increase the price of its stock."



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by aravoth
reply to post by David9176
 


the one where the prime rate was near zero for the last 12 years


www.alternet.org...



At first, investors mostly gambled that interest or currency exchange rates would go up or down. Then, during the 1990s, when interest rates were low around the world, the demand for more exotic "structured" investments -- including various derivatives and swaps based on debt -- skyrocketed.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 11:49 PM
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www.davidkorten.org...




A global economy in which those with incomes of less than a dollar a day are competing with others with incomes of more than a million dollars a day will not allocate efficiently. Aristotle observed more than 2,000 years ago that a society without extremes of wealth and poverty is more likely to be a healthy society. It is still true. Rule 5: Favor full disclosure. Market theory assumes that individuals make economic choices based on full information regarding the quality, contents, technical specifications, production processes, and safety record of the products and services from among which they are choosing, as well as the policies and practices of the company that produce them. Public policy should consistently side with the consumer’s need to know and require full disclosure of relevant information by sellers. Laws that require factories to inform the public regarding their toxic releases into the air and water and require processed foods to carry labels with nutritional information are positive examples of rules essential to efficient market function.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 12:01 AM
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www.pcdf.org...



Once upon a time local communities looked to corporations not only as sources of jobs, but as well of tax revenues to help cover the costs of essential local infrastructure and public services. For example, in 1957, corporations in the United States provided 45 percent of local property tax revenues. By 1987 their share had dropped to about 16 percent.





While the giants are shedding people, they are not shedding control over money, markets, or technology. The world's 200 largest industrial corporations, which employ only one third of one percent of the world's population, control 25 percent of the world's economic output. The top 300 transnationals, excluding financial institutions, own some 25 percent of the world's productive assets. Of the world's 100 largest economies, 51 are now corporations--not including banking and financial institutions. The combined assets of the world's 50 largest commercial banks and diversified financial companies amount to nearly 60 percent of The Economist's estimate of a $20 trillion global stock of productive capital.





For example, the popular Nike athletic shoes that sell for US$73 to $135 around the world are produced by 75,000 workers employed by independent contractors in low income countries. A substantial portion of these workers are in Indonesia--mostly women and girls housed in company barracks, paid as little as 15 cents an hour, and required to work mandatory overtime. Unions are forbidden and strikes are broken up by the military. In 1992, Michael Jordan reportedly received $20 million from the Nike corporation to promote the sale of its shoes, more than the total compensation paid to the Indonesian women who made them.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 12:03 AM
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www.pcdf.org...



It is ironic that corporate libertarians regularly pay homage to Adam Smith as their intellectual patron saint, since it is obvious to even the most casual reader of his epic work The Wealth of Nations that Smith would have vigorously opposed most of their claims and policy positions. For example, corporate libertarians fervently oppose any restraint on corporate size or power. Smith, on the other hand, opposed any form of economic concentration on the ground that it distorts the market's natural ability to establish a price that provides a fair return on land, labor, and capital; to produce a satisfactory outcome for both buyers and sellers; and to optimally allocate society's resources. Through trade agreements, corporate libertarians press governments to provide absolute protection for the intellectual property rights of corporations. Smith was strongly opposed to trade secrets as contrary to market principles and would have vigorously opposed governments enforcing a person or corporation's claim to the right to monopolize a lifesaving drug or device and to charge whatever the market would bear.





The theory of market economics, in contrast to free-market ideology, specifies a number of basic conditions needed for a market to set prices efficiently in the public interest. The greater the deviation from these conditions, the less socially efficient the market system becomes. Most basic is the condition that markets must be competitive. I recall the professor in my elementary economics course using the example of small wheat farmers selling to small grain millers to illustrate the idea of perfect market competition. Today, four companies--Conagra, ADM Milling, Cargill, and Pillsbury--mill nearly 60 percent of all flour produced in the United States, and two of them--Conagra and Cargill--control 50 percent of grain exports. In the real world of unregulated markets, successful players get larger and, in many instances, use the resulting economic power to drive or buy out weaker players to gain control of even larger shares of the market. In other instances, "competitors" collude through cartels or strategic alliances to increase profits by setting market prices above the level of optimal efficiency. The larger and more collusive individual market players become, the more difficult it is for newcomers and small independent firms to survive, the more monopolisitic and less competitive the market becomes, and the more political power the biggest firms can wield to demand concessions from governments that allow them to externalize even more of their costs to the community.



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 12:10 AM
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www.davidkorten.org...



Independent consulting economist Walter J. "John" Williams makes the case that many once useful official U.S. statistical indices have been so distorted to serve particular political interests that they are now seriously misleading and basically worthless for practical application. Such claims are not new. Williams spells out the specifics and reconstructs current statistical series to eliminate the distortions. He demonstrates that reported inflation rates are understated by as much as 4 to 5 percent, which overtime has reduced current Social Security payments to half what they would otherwise be. Unemployment is understated by as much as 7 percent. And GDP is overstated by as much as 1 to 2 percent, which significantly overstates economic vitality. For a summary, see his Alternative Data Series.


www.monies.cc...



For example, as Bernard Lietaer also points out, 97.5 percent of foreign exchange transactions in the world are now that of the money system rather than the real economy. The creation of money has detached from the real economy. There is a name for this economic disease. It's called "finance capitalism."





· Tax Speculative and Other Unearned Gains - If there is any place where a tax increase is justified, it is in taxing away speculative profits. Appropriate measures would encourage long-term investments in real assets. A first step would be a small tax on all purely financial transactions such as the exchange of one currency for another or the exchange of money for a financial instrument like a stock or bond. A second step would be a time graduated capital gains tax. Profits from the sale of any asset held less than a week might be taxed at a confiscatory rate of 90 percent or more on the ground that the gains are almost certainly speculative. Profits from the sale of a productive asset held more than 20 years might be taxed at a concessionary rate of 10 percent or less. A third step might be to tax land at its fair rental value. The tax would apply only to the rental value of the land itself, not to physical improvements, thus encouraging investment in physical improvements while eliminating the incentives for land speculation. Such changes will not be easily accomplished, and will depend on a massive political mobilization of those who believe that the benefits of the wealth-creation process should go to the productive and the needy.


[edit on 24-4-2010 by drew hempel]

[edit on 24-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


Drew!

You need an intervention

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU?

Please

Why is Av misguided in his assertions?



posted on Apr, 24 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Do you have a quote or reference for your claim about the $3 million grassroots union tour buses?

I can't find any source or quote to back that up.

THANK YOU FOR PROVIDING A SOURCE OR QUOTE TO BACK UP YOUR OTHERWISE ORIGINAL COMMENT.



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