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15,000 protest to RAISE taxes and to "Chop from the Top"

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posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by drew hempel
reply to post by aravoth
 


Mises IS third grade economics!

www.democraticunderground.com...



By ERIC NALDER SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER Paul Nicewonger is among 660 owners of large luxury boats in Washington state who paid no state sales tax on their boats and also can claim boat-related deductions on their federal income taxes. They have boats in what is called bare-boat charter (bare meaning without a crew). "You are buying the boat tax free," said Nicewonger. "Depending on what tax bracket you are in, Uncle Sam is paying for 40 percent of the boat. Plus no sales tax, in my case a $30,000 savings, and all repairs, moorings, etc., are tax deductible."





It would be OK to deduct all these expenses and depreciation up to a break-even point with their charter income, but not beyond, said Special Trial Judge Robert Armen.


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]


did you just quote the "democratic underground" to prove a point about Keynesian economics?

Ok, there is nothing left to add in this thread. You don't know what you are talking about, because you are listening to idiots.




posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


www.globalissues.org...




In the first part of this two-part series, Lori Wallach explains how the name of free trade was usurped by multinational corporations and right-wing think-tanks in the early 1990s. In 1995 the post-war trade agreement known as GATT was incorporated into the WTO at the Uruguay Round. This endorsed a much wider neo-liberal corporate agenda that stretched far beyond trade issues. It imposed radical new obligations on trading partners and in particular the developing world.


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 


You maybe didn't notice that Democratic Underground was LINKING another article?

www.seattlepi.com...

But then if you only have a third grade level education then that makes sense doesn't it?



www.thirdworldtraveler.com...


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:21 PM
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www.ewg.org...



“American taxpayers have been writing farm subsidy checks to wealthy absentee land owners, state prison systems, universities, public corporations, and very large, well-heeled farm business operations without the government so much as asking the beneficiaries if they need our money," says Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group. "Even if you live smack in the middle of a big city, type in a ZIP code and you'll find farm subsidy recipients.” The database shows that farm program benefits are highly concentrated in the hands of a small minority of subsidized individuals and operations, with the top 1 percent of beneficiaries claiming 17 percent of the crop subsidy benefits between 2003 and 2005, EWG says. The top five recipients of farm subsidies in California, according to EWG, are: 1 Dublin Farms Corcoran $4,286,864 2 Starrh & Starrh Ctn Grower Shafter $3,908,116 3 Buttonwillow Land and Cattle Co Buttonwillow $3,116,604 4 Hansen Ranches A Pts Corcoran $2,985,323 5 Sandridge Partners Sunnyvale $2,755,634



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:24 PM
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www.conservativenannystate.org...



According to the IRS, in 2001 (the most recent year examined) the government lost more than $340 billion in uncollected taxes.2 This is money that is actually owed to the federal government — not money that taxpayers have been able to legally avoid paying through creative accounting or the clever use of loopholes. This is a substantial sum. It is approximately 20 times what the federal government spends on Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) each year, the main welfare program for poor families. It is 55 times what the federal government spends on Head Start and almost 100 times annual foreign aid spending for Sub-Saharan Africa. Alternatively, the taxes that go unpaid each year are 30 percent of what the federal government actually collects in income taxes (personal and corporate). This means that if the federal government could find a way to get tax evaders to pay their bills, then tax rates could be reduced for everyone by 25 percent, and the federal government would have the same amount of money.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by Thirty_Foot_Smurf
 


www.markzepezauer.com...



Wealthfare–the money government gives away to corporations and wealthy individuals–costs us more than $817 billion a year. That’s • 47% of what it costs to run the government (which is about $1.73 trillion a year, not counting entitlement trust funds like Social Security and Medicare)


• 47% of what it costs to run the government (which is about $1.73 trillion a year, not counting entitlement trust funds like Social Security and Medicare)



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by Thirty_Foot_Smurf
 


www.amazon.com...



The Great American Tax Dodge: How Spiraling Fraud and Avoidance Are Killing Fairness, Destroying the Income Tax, and Costing You (Paperback) ~ Donald L. Barlett Donald L. Barlett (Author) › Visit Amazon's Donald L. Barlett Page Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author Are you an author? Learn about Author Central (Author), James B. Steele





The Great American Tax Dodge, the pair's latest examination of U.S. systems gone awry, spells out exactly how massive tax fraud is currently costing the nation enough to provide health care for its 44 million uninsured citizens--and precisely why the problem will continue to grow at virtually all economic levels unless remedial measures are immediately employed. In their fully detailed but always readable style, Barlett and Steele authoritatively discuss multimillionaires who never file tax returns, Internet sites that can link anyone to shady tax havens, the use of "phantom children" and "invisible employees" to illegitimately shelter income, and evasive techniques like offshore accounts and holding companies that illegally keep money from reaching the government agencies to which it is owed.


Super Rich Made $345 Million Each in 2007 as Their Tax Rates Plummeted By SAM GUSTIN Posted 8:15 PM 02/17/10 See full article from DailyFinance: www.dailyfinance.com...



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:34 PM
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In fact, between 1992 to 2007, the annual incomes of this tiny club of über-rich increased seven-fold to a whopping $345 million on average, while their effective tax rate dropped by more than one-third from a 1995 peak of nearly 30%, the data shows. See full article from DailyFinance: srph.it...





Between 1992 to 2007, the last year included in the data, the income of the 400 richest Americans rose 637% to the average $345 million mark. During that same period, their effective tax rate declined by over one-third, from a peak tax rate of nearly 30% to 16.6%. See full article from DailyFinance: srph.it...





Capital gains -- profits made from investments -- represented "66.3% of 2007 income for the top 400, up from 62.8% in 2006 and 36.1% in 1992," Johnston reported. Since 1992, "the bottom 90% of Americans have seen their incomes rise by 13% in 2009 dollars, compared with an increase of 399% for the top 400." See full article from DailyFinance: srph.it...


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 06:54 PM
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Unfortunately it appears to be people hoping a praying the government will give them something. Not sure I have any faith in such an assembly.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:07 PM
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reply to post by ReelView
 



Wealthfare:

www.markzepezauer.com...



total for 1996 edition: $448 billion a year total for 2004 edition: $817 billion a year Chapter 1: Social Security Inequities 1996 edition: $53 billion a year 2004 edition: $85 billion a year Chapter 2: Tax Breaks for Homeowners 1996 edition: $26 billion a year 2004 edition: $32.1 billion a year Chapter 3: Runaway Pensions 1996 edition: $7.6 billion a year 2004 edition: $7.6 billion a year Chapter 4: Accelerated Depreciation 1996 edition: $37 billion a year 2004 edition: $85 billion a year Chapter 5: Capital Gains 1996 edition: $37 billion a year 2004 edition: $89.8 billion a year Chapter 6: Transnationals 1996 edition: $12 billion a year 2004 edition: $137.2 billion a year Chapter 7: Insurance 1996 edition: $7.2 billion a year 2004 edition: $23.5 billion a year Chapter 8: Business meals 1996 edition: $5.5 billion a year 2004 edition: $8.8 billion a year Chapter 9: Muni bonds 1996 edition: $9.1 billion a year 2004 edition: $6.4 billion a year Chapter 10: Export subsidies 1996 edition: $2 billion a year 2004 edition: $1.8 billion a year Chapter 11: Pentagon Waste 1996 edition: $172 billion a year 2004 edition: $224 billion a year Chapter 12: S&L bailout 1996 edition: $32 billion, every year for thirty years 2004 edition: $32 billion, every year for thirty years (17 more to go) Chapter 13: Agribusiness subsidies 1996 edition: $18 billion a year 2004 edition: $30.5 billion a year Chapter 14: Media handouts 1996 edition: $8 billion a year 2004 edition: $14.2 billion a year Chapter 15: Nuke subsidies 1996 edition: $7.1 billion a year 2004 edition: $10 billion a year Chapter 16: Aviation subsidies 1996 edition: $5.5 billion a year 2004 edition: $5 billion a year Chapter 17: Mining subsidies 1996 edition: $3.5 billion a year 2004 edition: $4.7 billion a year Chapter 18: Oil & gas subsidies 1996 edition: $2.4 billion a year 2004 edition: $1.7 billion a year Chapter 19: Timber subsidies 1996 edition: $427 million a year 2004 edition: $976 million a year Chapter 20: Synfuels 1996 edition: $1.2 billion a year 2004 edition: $600 million a year Chapter 21: Ozone tax exemptions 1996 edition: $320 million a year 2004 edition: $320 million a year Chapter 22: Miscellaneous 1996 edition: $1.6 billion a year 2004 edition: $16.4 billion a year Chapter 23: What’s been left out Untold billions every year



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by ReelView
 


wealthfare.org...



As the debut post on wealthfare.org, I would like to start with the low hanging fruit of corporate welfare: Halliburton / KBR. Remember back in 2000, when Dick Cheney accepted “deferred” compensation from Halliburton? Well, now he’s collecting it. So, Mr. Cheney makes a deal with Halliburton for this deferred compensation. You don’t think that any company would just give somebody money out of the blue without expecting anything in return, would you? SO, in return for this deferred compensation, Halliburton and it’s subsidiary at the time, Kellogg, Brown, and Root receive a bunch of no-bid contracts from the U.S. government for work in two illegal wars that were started by the Bush / Cheney administration.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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www.pressaction.com...




A critical ingredient in Zepezauer’s method is comparing income and Social Security (“payroll”) taxes for rich and poor, and the concomitant government services they enjoy. The rich pay a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than do the poor. Capital gains taxes have shrunk drastically in the last half-century. Dividend and investment income is not taxed, and many very wealthy corporations pay no taxes at all. Adding injury to injury corporations are disproportionately the beneficiary of what Zepezauer says are the five basic types of wealthfare: tax breaks, subsidies, firesales, cost overruns, and lax enforcement of white collar crime. Regressive taxes, those that disproportionately hit the poorest, have seen the sharpest increases over the last quarter-century, notes Zepezauer. The wealthy, who have seen sharp increases in income in that time, pay a vastly smaller percentage of their income in taxes than do those of poorer and more moderate means. In the 1950s corporations paid half of federal revenues. Today they pay just 7.4%. The lost revenue has to be made up by higher taxes for the poor and middle-class, or in cuts in services.





“In 1994,” writes Zepezauer, “the murderous government of Indonesia got over $125 million in Export-Import loans to buy equipment from Hughs Aircraft. Ex-Im [also] insured a $3 million loan to General Electric to build a factory in Mexico that cost 1,500 jobs in Indiana. The Chinese government used an $18 million loan to modernize a steel plant—even though that company was accused of illegally dumping steel onto US markets below cost.” The government provides $7 billion a year in grants to foreign governments, which often come back to US arms manufacturers in the form of sales.


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:20 PM
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www.pittsburghlive.com...




For years Greg LeRoy has been America's chief whistle-blower on the subsidies, which he now estimates add up nationally to an eye-popping $50 billion a year. LeRoy's just-published book, "The Great American Jobs Scam'' (Berrett-Koehler) tells the story in full and colorful detail. There's the tale of how Raytheon, threatening to move defense operations out of Massachusetts in the 1990s, got the Legislature to give it tax breaks of about $21 million annually -- and then proceeded to reduce its Bay State payrolls by 4,100 people, or 21 percent, anyway. In New York a few years ago, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani offered $940 million to keep the New York Stock Exchange and its 1,500 jobs in town -- even though many of its member firms had already been subsidized to stay in Manhattan. The payoffs continue. North Carolina, for example, recently offered Dell, one of the nation's most successful technology companies, $225 million in tax incentives over 15 years to bring 1,500 jobs into the Piedmont Triad area.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:28 PM
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More taxes is always the solution. We all know that taxes always go down after the crisis is averted.


If you don't love taxes, you're a terrorist. Ask the SPLC and ADL.



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by ReelView
Unfortunately it appears to be people hoping a praying the government will give them something. Not sure I have any faith in such an assembly.


I guess the Teachers are hoping they will have their contacts honored, they have families and bills just like the rest of us, should they lay down and or do they have a voice too?

My favorite part of this all is that many of you are talking as if these people don't
watch peoples kids and try to teach them.

Ten hours a day for less than $20 a kid per day, so this country can go to work,
"OH YA THAT CLEM??? BY GEORGE THAT BASEBALL MUST HAVE BEEN TRAVELING FASTER THAN I THUNK"

You P'sOS show me a baby sitter who will watch a kid for $1.20 to $3.00 an hour...

ITs like a party of toddlers up in here, I suggest yall by some Sack cream and apply it
LIBERALLY. The KY you guys deal in doesn't do $#@$ all for your bb's.

Come Monday morning I am going to invest hardily in Depends and Binkies



[edit on 23-4-2010 by Janky Red]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by VendettaBeretta
 


If you don't love terrorists then you need tons of taxes to kill them:






Current Military $965 billion: • Military Personnel $129 billion • Operation & Maint. $241 billion • Procurement $143 billion • Research & Dev. $79 billion • Construction $15 billion • Family Housing $3 billion • DoD misc. $4 billion • Retired Pay $70 billion • DoE nuclear weapons $17 billion • NASA (50%) $9 billion • International Security $9 billion • Homeland Secur. (military) $35 billion • State Dept. (partial) $6 billion • other military (non-DoD) $5 billion • “Global War on Terror” $200 billion [We added $162 billion to the last item to supplement the Budget’s grossly underestimated $38 billion in “allowances” to be spent in 2009 for the “War on Terror,” which includes the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan] Past Military, $484 billion: • Veterans’ Benefits $94 billion • Interest on national debt (80%) created by military spending, $390 billion


[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]

[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by VendettaBeretta
 


Do we pay enough taxes yet to kill the "terrorists"?




posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:22 PM
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www.reuters.com...



Study says most corporations pay no U.S. income taxes





During that time corporate sales in the United States totaled $2.5 trillion, according to Democratic Sens. Carl Levin of Michigan and Byron Dorgan of North Dakota, who requested the GAO study. The report did not name any companies. The GAO said corporations escaped paying federal income taxes for a variety of reasons including operating losses, tax credits and an ability to use transactions within the company to shift income to low tax countries.


www.billshrink.com...



[edit on 23-4-2010 by drew hempel]



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by drew hempel
 


every post you make is proving my initial point. I have no Idea why you are posting it, Are you trying to make yourself look stupid?



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by aravoth
 



dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com...



Two out of every three United States corporations paid no federal income taxes from 1998 through 2005, according to a report released Tuesday by the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress. The study, which is likely to add to a growing debate among politicians and policy experts over the contribution of businesses to Treasury coffers, did not identify the corporations or analyze why they had paid no taxes. It also did not say whether they had been operating properly within the tax code or illegally evading it.



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