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Japanese craft to deliver space rock to outback

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posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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asteroid found 300 million kilometres from Earth.

The unmanned Hayabusa spacecraft, launched in May 2003, will become the first spacecraft to bring asteroid material to Earth when it lands in Woomera, South Australia, later this year.

''This is the first sample of a solid solar system body brought back since the moon missions some 40 years ago,'' said Jonathan Nally, editor of spaceinfo.com.au. ''It's a tremendous achievement by the Japanese.''

The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency said the 510-kilogram spacecraft made contact with the Itokawa asteroid in 2005 and has been making its return to Earth since then.

The innovation minister, Kim Carr, said the spacecraft will land within the 130,000 square kilometre Woomera Prohibited Area, the largest land-based test range in the world. ''Australia is proud to support Japan in this world-first expedition,'' Senator Carr said yesterday. ''Australia's contribution to this exciting space project will be significant.''

The spacecraft, which is carrying scientific instruments including wide-angle cameras and a telescopic camera, has also measured the gravity and surface condition of the Itokawa asteroid.

Scientists' understanding of asteroids has been limited to the study of meteorite samples. It is hoped the asteroid samples gathered by the spacecraft will give scientists an insight into the origin and evolution of the solar system as asteroids are, in Mr Nally's words, the builder's rubble of the solar system.


www.theage.com.au...

If there is any chance of finding the chemicals of life on an asteroid, it is with this asteroid.

I am excited to see what this asteroid's chemical make up is. Samples from an asteroid that haven't melted in Earth's atmosphere is an amazing thing to bring back to earth.




posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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Wow, very interesting!


I wonder what elements they will find, I can't wait to hear the results and maybe see some of the footage!

Good find



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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How will it bring the sample back without it burning up? Where is the sample located on the craft?



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by Quickfix
Wow, very interesting!


I wonder what elements they will find, I can't wait to hear the results and maybe see some of the footage!

Good find


Ya, I'm really excited for this... It would be horrible if it crashed on the way to Earth...



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 



S & F

I read through it. I know what. and How. But not

WHEN.


Or did I miss that.


ETA
June what?


[edit on 22-4-2010 by SLAYER69]



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
How will it bring the sample back without it burning up? Where is the sample located on the craft?
It's an unmanned space craft, it's just like a normal craft coming back to Earth.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


Yeah, it would be a tragedy if something went wrong.

Blame it on, THE ALIENS!


Hopefully everything goes to plan though and we get to see some new elements or something.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by Phlynx
 



S & F

I read through it. I know what. and How. But not

WHEN.


Or did I miss that.


ETA
June what?


[edit on 22-4-2010 by SLAYER69]


Later this year. No specifics or anything.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


I phrased my question badly: did the craft land on the asteroid and dig up a sample? Is the sample inside the craft?



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by InvisibleAlbatross
reply to post by Phlynx
 


I phrased my question badly: did the craft land on the asteroid and dig up a sample? Is the sample inside the craft?
That's what I am assuming. I think the picture may be miss leading...



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


Ok thanks. I figured I was asking a dumb question, but this is the first I have heard of this.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 



en.wikipedia.org...
After arriving at Itokawa, Hayabusa studied the asteroid's shape, spin, topography, colour, composition, density, and history. In November 2005, it landed on the asteroid and attempted to collect samples but failed to do so. Nevertheless, there is a high probability that some dust swirled into the sampling chamber, so it was sealed, and the spacecraft is scheduled to return to Earth by June 2010.





posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by Jbird
reply to post by Phlynx
 



en.wikipedia.org...
After arriving at Itokawa, Hayabusa studied the asteroid's shape, spin, topography, colour, composition, density, and history. In November 2005, it landed on the asteroid and attempted to collect samples but failed to do so. Nevertheless, there is a high probability that some dust swirled into the sampling chamber, so it was sealed, and the spacecraft is scheduled to return to Earth by June 2010.




So it will be June. Thanks. I'm really excited for this
.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by Phlynx
 


My main reason for posting that snippet was to point out the, shall we say generous, description of "space rock" offered in the article title.

Hope they get some results.

It's rather amazing to me that they've even managed to land safely, lift off and (hopefully) return.




[edit on Thu Apr 22 2010 by Jbird]



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