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The sun, like you've never seen it before

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posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 04:41 AM
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reply to post by TortoiseKweek
 


Without sounding rude here but this thread isn't the place to vent whatever problems you have with NASA and their images.

I don't want this thread derailed and turned into a flaming war.

Thanks.




posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by TortoiseKweek
Let's not fool ourselves, YES the photos are NICE... but are they as HIGH RES as what I posted? Is this the best NASA can do?? Forget it! It's time NASA shows us the real images. They have been caught out many times.... Time to come clean...

Putting a higher-than-16Mpixel cameral in orbit around the Sun is easy.

Getting the data down to Earth by radio link is not. Higher resolution means more bits, therefore more bandwidth and/or transmission time.

By the way, I think your attitude, in the face of these brilliant images, is spoiled, petty and pathetic.

(Sorry for starting the flame war, Chad.)



[edit on 22/4/10 by Astyanax]



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:03 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
Putting a higher-than-16Mpixel cameral in orbit around the Sun is easy.


Geez, do ya reckon??


Apart from anything else, these sensors are absolutely blasted by cosmic rays, HEP's, heat and cold... So I think anything over a few Mp is quite some achievement, especially if you want it to last more than a few hours in that environment...

I am still in awe of the SOHO team, and the way that remarkable craft has survived this long.


(Having said all that, I must sheepishly admit I was just a tad disappointed at the resolution of the Stereo images..)



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 06:37 AM
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Originally posted by Ecidemon
Whatever happened to that huge ribbon that people were worried about collapsing back onto itself? Had some really nifty pictures, but hadn't heard anything about it in quite some time. Did it finally collapse and turn into nothing as expected?


That magnetic ribbon collapsed and caused a rather substantial flare - a c3 I do believe...

anyway, this is great news - thanks for the info and the links Chad!



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by TortoiseKweek
 


Without sounding rude here but this thread isn't the place to vent whatever problems you have with NASA and their images.

I don't want this thread derailed and turned into a flaming war.

Thanks.


No Sweat,

You are not rude at all. I apologise if it seemed as if I was trying to derail the thread or cause a flame war. Not my M.O. or objective at all.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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I am so in love with the sun right now. Thank you science.

I just hope this relationship won't be spoiled by claims the sun is a big space station because there are cities and aliens in the new SDO images.


Awesome x 2 Mr. Chadwickus.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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Those are some nice looking pics and the videos are good quality, nice and clear...however, I suspect either we can do much better OR we have had the technology to capture stuff like this for years.

Someone very obscurely posted a link to this video a few weeks back in a thread about the sun, the following footage is taken from 1998 and 1999.


When you consider that this footage from 98 has surely lost some quality being compressed and uploaded to youtube. I'd say the original source video was probably pretty high definition, and almost on par with the SDO as far as visual quality to the naked eye. If someone can find more video like this than please send me the links.

Something about the sun that close is mesmerizing, I'm struck immediately with the thought that the Sun is actually alive and I have seen others say the same, it just looks so otherwordly and powerful.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by JKersteJr
 


Go watch the video in the OP, it explains exactly the difference between the old technology and the new technology.

Simply put, you could zoom in on a small area of the sun with pretty good quality with the older technology, as seen in the above video.

SDO can capture the whole sun in HD, so they can zoom in and out of different areas.

Again, the video explains this.




posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Fair enough, I just thought it odd that visually the technology from 12 years ago appears nearly identical to this "amazing" new stuff.

I still think that 98' footage is insane, maybe I just have been under a rock but I don't recall seeing video like that on the news, or anywhere ever and it seemed like the activity going on looked more fluid and natural than anything else I've seen.

I guess maybe I shouldn't be so quick to suspect NASA of holding anything back, but honestly when I look at how the rest of government agencies do business I can't help but think NASA wouldn't be totally honest all the time.

Nevertheless, I'm still interested in what they have to offer with this new SDO and thread flagged.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:05 AM
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Awesome thread Chad,

I really enjoyed the Youtube Clip. Man, are we in for a treat over the coming months/years!

Something tells me there are going to be lots of very interesting Sun thread cropping up this year..

Love the part where the guy says about how the sun changes every single second. This equipment is going to give us lots of answers and possibly lots of new questions too!!

g


[edit on 29-4-2010 by grantbeed]



posted on May, 9 2010 @ 05:12 AM
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After a series of engine burns SDO has reached geosynchronous orbit. Data will be available after a series of activities that include powering up the Ka-band transmitter, opening the instrument doors, and configuring the instruments to start science observations. This will happen approximately in mid-May, and the SDO team is looking forward to the new data.


sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

Less than two weeks and we should start seeing some action!

In HD!






[edit on 9/5/10 by Chadwickus]



posted on May, 9 2010 @ 05:17 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


ooohh...looks like I got my new 23" widescreen just in time!!

Should be good.

g



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