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The Sky Was Black On The Moon?

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posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by Havick007
reply to post by wmd_2008
 



Also dont forget the lunar surface isnt white, it's not totally reflective, it's grey, less light reflects of grey. If light reflection was such a big issue many of the photo's from the surface would have been way too bright for exposure wouldnt they?


[edit on 21-4-2010 by Havick007]


The bit in bold above WE can take pictures on earth lit by the sun so we can take pictures on the Moon its lit by the sun exposures are very similar




posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


So what if the stars won't twinkle? Your natural inclination is to look up at the sky for it's grand beauty. I bet you spend a lot of time laying on the ground just staring at the night time sky and it's vast grandeur.

I for one would take the time to look up if I was a moon astronaut instead of playing a little silly game of golf.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


So what if the stars won't twinkle? Your natural inclination is to look up at the sky for it's grand beauty. I bet you spend a lot of time laying on the ground just staring at the night time sky and it's vast grandeur.

I for one would take the time to look up if I was a moon astronaut instead of playing a little silly game of golf.


I am sure they looked up, but just did not see much. You have to realize that you can probably see stars much better from the Earth at night than from the Moon during lunar day. But a golf game in one sixth G, that is just pure win, I would not call it silly.

[edit on 21-4-2010 by Maslo]



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


We cant make it any clearer!!! if the astronauts were looking at a dark sky their eyes would adjust. Do you see how your comments totally conflict?



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Havick007
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


We cant make it any clearer!!! if the astronauts were looking at a dark sky their eyes would adjust. Do you see how your comments totally conflict?


They ONLY had a limited time outside the lander SO do you think it was a priority for them to gaze up NO.

All the info is given to you I said the Blackbird pilots would see stars IF they only looked at the black area DIDN'T I.

I have said the Astronauts were looking at THE BRIGHT surface and only had a quick glance at the sky.

I have shown the Moon is a lot MORE reflective than you thought thats why we can see it in a daytime sky.

I have given links to exposure times for Moon and Star pictures WHAT IS CONFUSING YOU SO MUCH!!!

PS What comment I made conflict


[edit on 21-4-2010 by wmd_2008]



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by dplum517
 


If it was faked, why didn't they fake the stars? After all, every sci-fi move fakes the stars. Why not this alleged one?


The reason is it would be impossible to do without errors. you would only need one star to .00002% out of place and it's all busted.

Korg.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by MR BOB
 


What about the Hubble Telescope and the Images obtained of the Universe ???

They look OK to me....



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by Maslo
 


Yeah I can see why they would want to play golf on the moon. Who wouldn't want to drive a ball over 400 yards?

However, the astronauts in the movie were asked about the sky. They all commented on how black the sky was. It was the blackest of the black. It's like looking in to the infinity.

Those are well educated men, military and science trained. They should know the answer, and yet they were flabbergasted. Why?

Then there's this press conference. When asked if they saw any star, they hesitated then they slowly said they could not "recall".

And they are well educated men.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 

Educated men who had just spent nearly a week looking into the absolute blackness of the Abyss. Absolute Nothingness, wrapping them in silence, awake or asleep. No day. No night. Only the promise of instant death; an eternal tomb in the cold vastness of space. Palpable darkness to the end of infinity. I can't imagine why educated men would get a bit rattled by the blackness of space.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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Honestly, what do you think google is for? The main reason is down to light reflecting from the surface of the moon dust. The light reflected from this will all but block out the brightest of objects in the sky.

I went up to an observatory at Kielder last month, and despite being at the top of the mountains up there, with not a single light visible for miles around in complete pitch darkness and next to no cloud, 80% of the visible stars were blocked out just due to a nearly full moon. And this was with telescopes nearly twice the size of me. Bear in mind the size of the moon in the sky is tiny. The light from the moon when you are actually standing on it, being basically a bright white reflective dust covered monster in every direction you can see, it is simply too bright to allow the very small amount of light from the stars to be visible without very good optics and very long exposures.

Not meaning to sound rude, but this question has been asked for decades, just type it into google and there's you're answer



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by crezo
Honestly, what do you think google is for?



Errr... making money for the shareholders??

population surveillance....

Sourcing porn???


Korg...



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 05:36 PM
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hehe... well said sir
Sourcing porn being the main one obviously... very closely followed by sourcing new rims



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 06:06 PM
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Space Center Houston here at Houston's NASA actually has an exhibit to explain this and it simply states that you cannot see stars on the moon for the same reason you cannot see stars during the day on Earth, you just don't see the blue atmosphere.

Also their cameras were not sensitive enough to pick up the small points of lights against the sun and bright earth.

*



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by whipnet
 




Space Center Houston here at Houston's NASA actually has an exhibit to explain this and it simply states that you cannot see stars on the moon for the same reason you cannot see stars during the day on Earth, you just don't see the blue atmosphere.


I wonder if there is a link for this?

I don't believe they actually said this cause it's not the same on the moon as it is here on Earth.

"You cannot see stars on the moon for the same reason you cannot see stars during the day on Earth"???? I'll believe when I see it. I don't think those NASA scientists actually said that.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


Why is it, that we can see stars in the sky above, during daylight, when viewed from the bottom of a deep Mine Shaft ???



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by The Matrix Traveller
 


WHAT? Link please.



posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


It is a myth...

Quote;

From ngm.nationalgeographic.com...

Since childhood I've heard it's possible to look up from the bottom of a well and see stars, even in daylight. Aristotle wrote about this, and so did Charles Dickens. On many a dark night the vision of that round slip of sky with stars has comforted me. Here's the only problem: It's not true. Western civilization was in no great hurry to give up this folklore; astronomers believed it for centuries, but a few of them eventually thought to test it and had their illusions dashed by simple observation.


jra

posted on Apr, 21 2010 @ 10:26 PM
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Even though the astronauts didn't see any stars while on there EVA's. I'm sure they could have, if they spent some time trying, but they didn't exactly have a whole lot of free time to just sit around and look for stars. When they did have a few minutes of free time, they did other things like whack a few golf balls like one astronaut did.

I believe it was mentioned earlier in this thread that they could see stars from inside the LM while looking through an optical device (its name escapes me at the moment). They used this thing specifically to look at stars and compare what they saw with a star chart to help confirm there location on the Lunar surface.

And while stars are way to faint to show up in photos set to daytime exposure settings. Venus is not. Venus is the third brightest object in the Lunar sky after the Sun and Earth. Venus has shown up in a handful of photos, specifically the B&W ones, since B&W film is more sensitive than colour film.

There is a thread on ApolloHoax.net where a member named 'Data Cable' spots it in 9 consecutive photos from Apollo 14 (scroll down to the 3rd post from the bottom). The astronauts may have or may not have seen it, it's very faint in the original photos, but its position near the Earth is correct. You can load up a program like Stellarium and set the correct time, date and location and see for yourself.



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 03:44 AM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien


Space Center Houston here at Houston's NASA actually has an exhibit to explain this and it simply states that you cannot see stars on the moon for the same reason you cannot see stars during the day on Earth, you just don't see the blue atmosphere.


I wonder if there is a link for this?

I don't believe they actually said this cause it's not the same on the moon as it is here on Earth.

"You cannot see stars on the moon for the same reason you cannot see stars during the day on Earth"???? I'll believe when I see it. I don't think those NASA scientists actually said that.

Not in those words, but it is sort of right..

Firstly, I am flabbergasted by some of the 'answers' posted here. jra is dead right, and credit to Maslo for being the first to get it mostly right..

The astronauts eyes were adjusted to full daytime viewing, perhaps even *brighter* than 'normal' daytime - no atmosphere to dim the sun a little.... They did NOT have time to wait patiently for their eyes to adjust to night time levels, and of course they would then be temporarily blinded for a few moments, when they looked back down. And in 1/6 gravity wearing a space suit and with the potential for a brief moment of vertigo, that would be a *really* bad move.

During the mission, they could stare at the stars all they wanted through no atmosphere via the spacecraft's ports when the sun was nowhere in view, so why on earth (pun intended), would they *want* to waste their incredibly valuable time on the lunar surface with the sun beating brightly down, to do something that they could pretty much do at any time on earth with far better results?

But it's even LESS worthwhile, if you think it through. Yes, the stars are a *tiny* bit clearer and brighter from the lunar surface, but during the lunar day for non-night adapted eyes, that tiny difference would be completely overwhelmed - their visibility would in fact be *much* less than on a decent moonless night here on earth.

To see anything useful at all, they would not only have to shield their eyes from all reflecting objects (very difficult, because even the internals of the helmet would catch light - you tell me - how would you do it?), but also wait the fifteen minutes or so for night adaptation to occur. And I'm betting that looking up (let alone with your eyes shielded) was not all that easy in those spacesuits/helmets.


Seriously, I just don't get this. They went to the MOON to examine the lunar environment, gravity/vacuum effects, collect samples. And you wonder why they don't shield their eyes for fifteen minutes just to see a scene they could see on any clear night from earth, risking their safety and wasting their incredibly valuable time in the process???


By the way, here's a related question for you.

Do the stars actually vanish during the day? Think about it.
- They are obviously still up there...
- The amount of atmosphere between your eyes and them hasn't changed...

So why can't we see them in daylight? At least partially, it's the same reason that the astronauts can't see them - daylight adapted eyes. So go on, shield your eyes, *then* see if you can see any stars...? no?


I did say partially - as there is an additional factor operating. Namely the atmospheric scattering of light (the blue sky) that overwhelms most of them. But truth is, a couple of them are in fact bright enough to just be seen by naked eye *despite* the blue scattering. So I challenge you to go out in sunlight and spot a star or planet. I've done it successfully, but it ain't easy, and you have to pick your object carefully (Venus, Jupiter or Sirius..) and know where to look...

By the way, jra's comment about how Venus was detected on Apollo film frames is one of the myriad ways to PROVE that the Apollo missions were real.

[edit on 22-4-2010 by CHRLZ]



posted on Apr, 22 2010 @ 05:15 AM
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To the people below, I'm sorry you're wrong.

The moon is one of the least reflective objects in our solar system.
The term is Albedo. The moons is 0.07-0.13, earth is about 0.37.
Snow is 0.9. This means the moon is about 9 times darker than snow.

www.universetoday.com...

Also, where they landed, the Sea of Tranquility is one of darker spots of the moon. Therefore the value could be even lower than 0.07.

In a nutshell, its darker up there than it appears. All they had to do was look up away from the (darker than first thought surface) and after a minute or so, the stars would have been clearly visible. Having no atmosphere would also help greatly.

from universe today: The object with the highest albedo in the Solar System is Saturn's moon Enceladus, with an albedo of 99%. On the other hand, asteroids can have albedos as low as 4%. The Earth's moon has an albedo of about 7%. Can you imagine if we had Enceladus for a moon? Now that would be bright.


Originally posted by Maslo
the landscape is always lit brightly, more than on a brightest summer day on earth.



Originally posted by the_denv
Maybe the reflection of the Sun shinning on our bright white Moon blinds the astronauts on the surface, a natural form of light pollution.



Originally posted by Apex Predator
The rays of the Sun are not filtered and reflect back from the lunar surface without losing much intensity.



Originally posted by Bedlam
The reflected light from the surface would constrict your pupils to the point you could not possibly see the stars.



Originally posted by wmd_2008
the suface of the Moon its bathed in bright sunlight the surface is very reflective so your eyes adjust to that light level, think about being on a beach on a bright summers day.



Originally posted by Connector
First the moon is a huge reflection board. That's why we can see it here on earth. The intensity is immense and constant[edit on 20-4-2010 by Connector]



Originally posted by Tie No Bows!
Its the brightness of the moon thats the bogeyman.



Originally posted by wmd_2008
So you think not a lot of light reflects of the MOON well look at these examples. The light source on the Moon is the sun pictures on moon are similar to daylight shots on earth HOW do you think we can see the Moon in daylight if it did not reflect light well.



Originally posted by wmd_2008
I have shown the Moon is a lot MORE reflective than you thought thats why we can see it in a daytime sky.



Originally posted by crezo
The main reason is down to light reflecting from the surface of the moon dust.
The light from the moon when you are actually standing on it, being basically a bright white reflective dust covered monster in every direction you can see,


[edit on 22-4-2010 by ppk55]



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